Aug 1, 2014
Tim Lester

Street Food Cartel fan? Go east

Street Food Cartel line up in Edinburgh’s Assembly George Square Gardens throughout August, as the largest arts and cultural festival on the planet takes place! Joining us this year: scoop, with their retro-American trailer kitchen, “The Bullet”, the behemoth that is pad BKK’s Thai and Southeastern Asian pavement kitchen and the wood-burning ovens of the newest Street Food Cartel member, So la ti dough; serving-up piping hot fresh dough pizzas, baked at 400°C.

Read the full article on STREETFOODCARTEL

via STREETFOODCARTEL

Recommended Reading

Aug 1, 2014
Terri Judson

Willcox Chamber, vineyards team to promote the area

Willcox vineyards

Willcox vineyards

Carrie Larson, left, of Scottsdale, and Victoria Johnson, of Tucson, enjoy a sample of the wine produced by Grand Canyon Winery and poured by Carole Kennelly during the Willcox Wine Festival, May 17. Looking on is Jeff May.



Posted: Thursday, July 31, 2014 12:00 am

Willcox Chamber, vineyards team to promote the area

By Ainslee S. Wittig
Arizona Range News

Eastern Arizona Courier

|
0 comments

WILLCOX — Willcox Wine Country and the Willcox Chamber of Commerce and Agriculture have joined forces.

The chamber’s governing board unanimously approved a joint marketing resolution July 16. The plan calls for the Willcox Chamber to provide a “cooperative marketing group for the Arizona Wine Industry within the Willcox trade area.”

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on

Thursday, July 31, 2014 12:00 am.

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Aug 1, 2014
Tim Lester

Fortitude Valley comes alive with James Street Food and Wine Trail

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The organisers, The James Street Initiative, say they attracted more than 5000 people to the event last year.

The full program is online at jamesst.com.au.

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          Recommended Reading

          Aug 1, 2014
          Terri Judson

          Mexico, Caribbean food festivals

          Imagine lavish multicourse dinners served on the beach, cocktail parties with celebrity chefs you’ve seen on TV or wine tastings led by award-winning sommeliers. These are just a few reasons why tourists are flocking to wine and food festivals being held at resort destinations across Mexico and the Caribbean.

          These festivals celebrate regional foods, wines and spirits, simultaneously offering guests a taste of local culture and opportunities to mix with locals as well as other visitors who share their passions for gastronomy.

          “The number of festivals is definitely increasing, a reflection in great part of the growing interest in where food comes from,” said C. Michael Hall, a scholar in tourism and hospitality and author of “Food and Wine Festivals and Events Around the World.”

          Often held during low-occupancy or shoulder seasons, festivals help promote destinations as well as individual resorts, restaurants and food producers. In addition to their economic benefits and support of aspiring chefs, many provide assistance to charitable and community organizations.

          Ready to check one out? Plan ahead, because tickets sell out quickly. You can often purchase festival packages that sometimes include hotel stays, or opt to buy tickets for one or more events. Here is a sampling of what to expect at some popular ones; additional information can be found on the websites shown:

          Valle de Guadalupe Fiestas de la Vendimia

          Location: Baja California

          Dates: Through Aug. 17

          This two-week festival of the “big crush” began Aug. 1, celebrating the wine harvest. Participants can partake in more than 40 events across the region, including vineyard tours, exclusive dinners and galas, and live entertainment ranging from jazz to opera. This is one to consider for next year because the kickoff was a sellout. It is held at the Riviera del Pacifico in Ensenada, once an iconic hotel for the Hollywood elite in the 1930s.

          Though Mexico is famous for tequila and beer, this region produces 90 percent of the country’s wines, which are garnering increased attention from wine enthusiasts. More than 50 wineries participate. tinyurl.com/bajawine

          Sabor a Cabo

          Location: Los Cabos, Mexico

          Dates: Nov. 30 – Dec. 6

          This weeklong festival highlights regional cuisine and wines of Baja California. Taking advantage of the temperate climate, most events are held outdoors. For example, the main event (typically drawing as many as 2,000 people) is held in a sculpture garden at Puerto Los Cabos, with more than 50 restaurants and 16 wineries participating.

          Sponsored by CANIRAC, a Mexican restaurant trade group, and the Los Cabos Tourism Board, proceeds from the main event are donated to the fire department, Red Cross and Children’s Foundation of Los Cabos. Among the chefs confirmed to attend: Federico Zanellato (formerly at the legendary NOMA restaurant in Denmark) and chef/restaurateur Richard Sandoval. saboracabo.mx

          Cancun-Riviera Maya Wine Food Festival

          Location: Cancun, Mexico

          Dates: March 12-15

          Now in its fourth year, this festival celebrates cuisine from Europe and the Americas, featuring top chefs and sommeliers. Festivalgoers participate in wine and spirit (including mezcal) tastings; a gourmet tasting village featuring local products and signature dishes; a Taste the New World opening dinner; interactive cooking challenges with chefs; and a lecture-style culinary education series. Next year’s honorees are not yet named, but this year’s tribute dinner held at Secrets The Vine honored French chef Daniel Boulud and Mexican chef Guillermo Gonzalez Beristain.

          Founded by David Amar, who hoped to raise the gastronomic profile of the region, the festival has attracted broad sponsorship from Food Wine Magazine, Travel + Leisure magazine, the Cancun Convention Visitors Bureau, the Riviera Maya Tourist Promotion Trust and the Mexico Tourism Board. A portion of funds is used to provide computers for a nonprofit housing program, for educational and social services for needy children and families, and to award scholarships to gastronomy students. crmfest.com

          Taste of Capella Food Wine Festival

          Location: Cabo San Lucas, Mexico

          Dates: July 8-12

          This festival is intimate (limited to 120 participants) and immersive. Held at a spectacular five-star beach resort located a Land’s End (where the Pacific Ocean meets the Sea of Cortez), this four-day epicurean adventure features gourmet Baja and international cuisine and offers opportunities to interact with chefs, winemakers and mixologists. The resort’s food and wine director and executive chef both once worked under legendary chef Thomas Keller. Festivities include a welcome reception showcasing artisanal Mexican cheeses, wines and specialty dishes; a tequila seminar and wine tastings; a beach barbecue; and a five-course dinner with each course prepared by a different chef. capellahotels.com/cabosanlucas/foodandwine

          Caribbean Food Wine Festival

          Location: Providenciales, Turks and Caicos

          Dates: Nov. 6-8

          Celebrating Caribbean culture and cuisine, this event is sponsored by local hotels and restaurants in partnership with the Turks and Caicos Tourist Board. All-star chefs from around the world (such as “Top Chef” contestant Leah Cohen of New York’s Pig Khao) and renowned vintners take part. Now in its fourth year, it raises funds for the Department of Youth Affairs and the islands’ Little Chefs mentor program that supports and encourages local chefs to pursue careers in hospitality, an industry vital to the local economy.

          The welcome dinner, limited to 100 guests, takes place at Blue Haven Resort. Also on the menu: a Women of Wine luncheon at Beach House Fire and Ice restaurant; four food and wine pairings (limited to 20 people each) at West Bay Club; an Island Street Food Fair demonstrating expert grilling and barbecue techniques; Dinner with the Stars at Grace Bay Club, which is a lavish five-course food and wine pairing held on the beach; and The Gourmet Safari, a progressive dinner party that allows visitors to dine at different resorts and discover talented local chefs. caribbeanfoodandwinefestivaltci.com

          St. Croix Food Wine Experience

          Location: St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands

          Dates: April 12-18

          Recommended Reading

          Aug 1, 2014
          Jim Benson

          Food Cart Fest starts Saturday in Surrey

          SURREY — The much anticipated Food Cart Fest in Surrey is finally taking off next Saturday (Aug. 9) after being pushed back a month from its expected launch date.

          The event, which was originally slated to take place at Surrey’s new city hall plaza every Saturday over the summer, has been moved to Holland Park and will run for four weeks beginning Aug. 9 with food trucks on a rotating basis.

          “We were just trying to figure out what the best spot is to do it in,” said Daniel Fazio of Arrival Agency, the company responsible for hosting Vancouver’s popular Food Cart Fest as well as Vancouver’s annual arts and music festival Khatsalano.

          “With the Food Cart Fest, it’s not just about eating, it’s about community and it’s about coming together in a space where you can hang out and enjoy company. We really, really loved Holland Park so we kept pushing the city to do something there.”

          Fazio said that the Food Cart Fest could better utilize Holland Park than Surrey’s new city hall plaza as the building is closed on Saturdays with lesser foot traffic than the park.

          Along with street food from food trucks like Didi’s Greek, DougieDog and Vij’s Railway Express, the event will have an artisan market, DJs, kids’ activities and more.

          Laurie Cavan, Surrey’s general manager of parks, recreation and culture, said the food carts did not have their permits in place for a July launch, which led to the delay.

          Cavan admitted that there was no public notification of the festival’s delay, so people who may have showed up at the new city hall plaza on July 5 for the inaugural bash were met with crickets.

          “It was no one’s intention to delay it,” she said.

          “They just needed to meet a few requirements with Fraser Health which has all been taken care of now.”

          Surrey’s Food Cart Fest kicks off at 12 p.m. next Saturday (Aug. 9) and runs until 5 p.m. Admission to the event is free for the remainder of the summer.

          kalexandra@thenownewspaper.com

          © Surrey Now

          Recommended Reading

          Aug 1, 2014
          Jim Benson

          Surrey gets its Food Cart Fest this Saturday

          SURREY — The much anticipated Food Cart Fest in Surrey is finally taking off next Saturday (Aug. 9) after being pushed back a month from its expected launch date.

          The event, which was originally slated to take place at Surrey’s new city hall plaza every Saturday over the summer, has been moved to Holland Park and will run for four weeks beginning Aug. 9 with food trucks on a rotating basis.

          “We were just trying to figure out what the best spot is to do it in,” said Daniel Fazio of Arrival Agency, the company responsible for hosting Vancouver’s popular Food Cart Fest as well as Vancouver’s annual arts and music festival Khatsalano.

          “With the Food Cart Fest, it’s not just about eating, it’s about community and it’s about coming together in a space where you can hang out and enjoy company. We really, really loved Holland Park so we kept pushing the city to do something there.”

          Fazio said that the Food Cart Fest could better utilize Holland Park than Surrey’s new city hall plaza as the building is closed on Saturdays with lesser foot traffic than the park.

          Along with street food from food trucks like Didi’s Greek, DougieDog and Vij’s Railway Express, the event will have an artisan market, DJs, kids’ activities and more.

          Laurie Cavan, Surrey’s general manager of parks, recreation and culture, said the food carts did not have their permits in place for a July launch, which led to the delay.

          Cavan admitted that there was no public notification of the festival’s delay, so people who may have showed up at the new city hall plaza on July 5 for the inaugural bash were met with crickets.

          “It was no one’s intention to delay it,” she said.

          “They just needed to meet a few requirements with Fraser Health which has all been taken care of now.”

          Surrey’s Food Cart Fest kicks off at 12 p.m. next Saturday (Aug. 9) and runs until 5 p.m. Admission to the event is free for the remainder of the summer.

          kalexandra@thenownewspaper.com

          © Surrey Now

          Recommended Reading

          Aug 1, 2014
          Jim Benson

          Surrey gets its Food Cart Fest next Saturday

          SURREY — The much anticipated Food Cart Fest in Surrey is finally taking off next Saturday (Aug. 9) after being pushed back a month from its expected launch date.

          The event, which was originally slated to take place at Surrey’s new city hall plaza every Saturday over the summer, has been moved to Holland Park and will run for four weeks beginning Aug. 9 with food trucks on a rotating basis.

          “We were just trying to figure out what the best spot is to do it in,” said Daniel Fazio of Arrival Agency, the company responsible for hosting Vancouver’s popular Food Cart Fest as well as Vancouver’s annual arts and music festival Khatsalano.

          “With the Food Cart Fest, it’s not just about eating, it’s about community and it’s about coming together in a space where you can hang out and enjoy company. We really, really loved Holland Park so we kept pushing the city to do something there.”

          Fazio said that the Food Cart Fest could better utilize Holland Park than Surrey’s new city hall plaza as the building is closed on Saturdays with lesser foot traffic than the park.

          Along with street food from food trucks like Didi’s Greek, DougieDog and Vij’s Railway Express, the event will have an artisan market, DJs, kids’ activities and more.

          Laurie Cavan, Surrey’s general manager of parks, recreation and culture, said the food carts did not have their permits in place for a July launch, which led to the delay.

          Cavan admitted that there was no public notification of the festival’s delay, so people who may have showed up at the new city hall plaza on July 5 for the inaugural bash were met with crickets.

          “It was no one’s intention to delay it,” she said.

          “They just needed to meet a few requirements with Fraser Health which has all been taken care of now.”

          Surrey’s Food Cart Fest kicks off at 12 p.m. next Saturday (Aug. 9) and runs until 5 p.m. Admission to the event is free for the remainder of the summer.

          kalexandra@thenownewspaper.com

          © Surrey Now

          Recommended Reading

          Jul 31, 2014
          Freddie Kitson

          BeerFest at the ballpark

          Beer lovers, mark your calendars for Charlotte BeerFest, which will be held September 20 at BBT Ballpark.

          Featured breweries will include OMB, Foothills, SweetWater, Oskar Blues, Natty Greene’s, Leinenkugel’s, D9 Brewery, Stella Artois, Magic Hat, Blue Moon, RJ Rockers, Goose Island and many others.

           “We are excited to host the inaugural Charlotte BeerFest and look forward to showcasing some of the world’s finest brews for the area’s beer enthusiasts,” said Charlotte BeerFest Executive Director Chris Boukedes. “We’re proud to celebrate this culture of craftsmanship and artisan brewing.”

          A portion of the proceeds from the event will benefit Ace TJ’s Grin Kids and the USO of North Carolina.

           “It’s certainly a privilege and an honor to host this event,” said Dan Rajkowski, executive vice president and COO for the Charlotte Knights. “We’ve had a lot of functions going on throughout BBT Ballpark, but the Charlotte BeerFest will probably be the premier largest one that we will have in our first year, so we are looking forward to it.”

          With more than 110 breweries (and counting), North Carolina is one of the top 5 fastest-growing states in the nation for craft brewing. As the industry grows, Charlotte is quickly becoming a hotspot for beer enthusiasts.

          “Charlotte has a tremendously fast-growing craft beer community,” said John Marrino, founder of OMB, Charlotte’s oldest brewery. “Five years ago there were no breweries in Charlotte. Now we have eight with several more on the way… The beautiful thing about craft beer is that it’s best when it’s fresh. So when it’s made locally, it’s fantastic.”

          Marrino said beer festivals are a great way to introduce locals to the world of craft beer, which he said makes up only one percent of the Charlotte beer market.

          “Beer is a wonderful food,” said Marrino. “It’s good for you, and it makes people smile. A festival like this just enhances that.”

          Ray Goodrich, director of marketing and communications for Foothills Brewing, said given the opportunity to try hundreds of different craft beers in one setting, attendees are guaranteed to find at least one beer that they like.

          “It’s really exciting to try something new,” he said. “Everybody’s always worried about calories, but the taste is really a great trade off.”

          The festival will feature a variety of food, adult fun (must be 21 and older to enter) and live music with performances by the Grammy Award-winning band Blues Traveler along with local acts Simplified and Charity Case.

          General admission tickets are $50 and include unlimited beer samples, a sampling cup and access to all performances, special beer-themed activities and contests. VIP tickets are $100 and include additional benefits such as expedited entry at the gates, VIP area, private beer tasting with exclusive craft beers, a gift bag and entry to an exclusive VIP hospitality suite.

          Visit www.charlottebeerfest.com for more information or to purchase tickets.

          Comments

          Leave a Comment

          Recommended Reading

          Jul 31, 2014
          Freddie Kitson

          Pintful: Across the pond, thirst is growing for American craft beer

          Under a bright summer sun, craft beer fans moved from tent to tent sampling American ales, California commons and West Coast India pale ales.

          A food truck rodeo anchored one end, a stage the other. A guy in a shirt from a popular Colorado brewery mingled in the crowd. The speakers blared Dolly Parton’s “Jolene.”

          For a moment, it felt like Hickory Hops, or any of the other great outdoor craft beer festivals in North Carolina. But I stumbled upon this one 4,000 miles from home while on vacation in Barcelona, Spain.

          The surreal experience across the Atlantic Ocean at the La Fira del Poblenou spoke to the growing thirst abroad for American-style craft brews – not to mention the small-world craft beer community.

          The Brewers Association, an industry trade group, recently reported American craft beer exports increased 49 percent in 2013 to 282,500 barrels and an estimated $73 million.

          The growth in Europe is particularly intriguing given that American brewers drew their inspiration from their predecessors in beer-soaked regions of Germany, Belgium and the Czech Republic.

          Spain is not known for its craft beer. But the country’s tastes are beginning to change.

          “The beer scene is super strong and growing here,” Alan Sheppard, the head brewer at Edge Brewing in Barcelona, told me at the festival. “It’s like the states in ’96-’97.”

          The Florida native said he opened a 15-barrel operation in January that brews American-style beers, such as his Flor de la Vida (Flower of Life) American Pale Ale, to “bring the craft beer revolution to Spain.”

          “Everybody just wants American-style West Coast IPAs over here,” Sheppard said.

          (In Spanish, he told me, an IPA is pronounced “eee-pa.” Craft beer is known as cervesa artesana and a brewery is a cerveseria.)

          It turned out Sheppard previously worked for a brewing equipment company and helped install Starpoint Brewery’s system in Carrboro. (“He’s a great guy,” said Starpoint’s Tim Harper when I later recounted the connection.) He later sent me to a great craft beer bar, La Cerveteca, where a beer cooler featured a Carolina Brewery sticker. (“This is our hometown brewery,” my excited wife tried to tell the non-English-speaking bartender in a broken Spanish that left him confused but smiling.)

          A few tents down from Sheppard at the festival, Peter Brown, a co-owner at BeerCat, another new local brewery, said the craft beer scene in Spain was nonexistent five years ago. And it remains a small portion of sales, despite the growth.

          Most bars in Spain feature only one or two taps and universally pour flavorless light lagers such as Estrella (“es-stray-ya”) and Mahou (rhymes with “cow”).

          “Spain drinks the third-largest volume of beer in the world but … beer is seen as just something to cleanse your palate. It’s clear, fizzy and cold,” said Brown, a British lawyer who now lives in Barcelona. “So we need to retrain palates. It’s getting traction.”

          What I’m tasting

          Back in North Carolina, a few Spanish craft beers are now appearing in select bottle shops.

          At Beer Study in Chapel Hill, I found Bernabé 11 from Mateo and Bernabé, a craft brewer from the La Rioja region in Northern Spain.

          The golden ale tasted sweet and lightly fruity. It’s a good illustration of Spanish craft beer – good but not yet great.

          Contact John at 919-829-4698 or jfrank@newsobserver.com.

          Recommended Reading

          Jul 31, 2014
          Freddie Kitson

          Doctor Fermento: August brings the start of beer festival season

          Being an avid local craft beer lover, I chase beer festivals with abandon. No, I haven’t been to every annual beer festival in the state, but those that I haven’t visited are high on my must-attend list.

          The primary deterrents for the festivals I’ve yet to attend are time and cost since most of them are beyond driving distance and involve air travel and overnight accommodations, at a minimum.

          I attend beer festivals for reasons that go beyond sheer enjoyment. Most festivals support a good cause, and the brewers that attend them almost always donate their beer. I’m not a cause junkie by any means, but my attendance is a vote of confidence for the local breweries that I love, and I like to support the causes that are important to them.

          The Sept. 13 Capital Brewfest is a good example. This one’s on my “yet to attend” list, but maybe this is the year. This is the gig’s third year, and it’s hosted by the Rotary of Juneau. In years past, it has benefitted SAGA. I don’t have a whole bunch of intel on this year’s event but suspect it will be the same. Regardless, it’s one of the few beer festivals that are “in the ‘hood” so to speak, and it’s definitely worthy of your attendance.

          The fest takes place 1-5 p.m. at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center. Tickets will set you back $32.50 but get you admission, a commemorative glass and unlimited 2-ounce samples. Unlimited samples are pretty great for a beer festival; I don’t see too many festivals organized this way, but who’s complaining? Alaskan Brewing Company will obviously factor in huge at this gig, but the state’s other breweries will be equally represented. Check out the information at capbrewfest.com and on Facebook.

          Closer to me here in Los Anchorage are a number of other cool fests you might consider if you happen to be up this. The most imminent, and undeniably my favorite, is the 3rd Annual 49th State Brewing Company’s Augtoberfest that takes place Friday, Aug. 1 and Saturday, Aug. 2 at the brewery’s expansive grounds in Healy.

          Though I wouldn’t call driving to Healy from Anchorage casual (it’s a haul at right around 250 miles), it can be spectacular if the weather cooperates. When the skies are clear, the crowning fireweed backlit by the sun and sweeping vistas of Denali reward the festgoer on the way up. This can come at a cost – driving south into the sun with a hangover on a bleary-eyed Sunday morning.

          This year, as part of the gig, you can get a discount ticket and experience the incredible scenery from the big windows of an Alaska Railroad passenger car as it threads its way north through some of Alaska’s most rugged backcountry if you don’t feel like driving.

          When I attend, I stay at the Park’s Edge Log Cabins, just off the highway and over a little hill in Healy. No, this isn’t a shameless plug. I’ll be the first to admit the view from there isn’t spectacular and it’s off the beaten path on a dusty road (there are bed and breakfasts and accommodations closer to the brewery grounds), but that’s the allure.

          Returning to the cabin at night at 2 a.m. rewarded me with the most uncanny silence I’ve ever experienced on Earth. I was really struck by the complete absence of sound, and it was nice after spending the night in a rowdy crowd twisting to music by some of my favorite local bands.

          Better yet, a simple phone call fetched a brewery transport van that drove me down the dusty road and up the short distance to the brewery, freeing me of the hassle of worrying about driving intoxicated. This is a double-edged sword for me because having transportation is a license to rage and I always tend to overconsume as a result.

          The brewery is encompassed by and accessed through a huge Bavarian-mimicking beer garden with a grand stage, outdoor dining areas, a horseshoe pit, fire pit and plenty of room to roam. An indoor pub is warm and inviting when the weather’s cool and dark and cool when it’s hot outside.

          A central, circular hooded fire pit provides a nice touch to the very homey enclave. The menu’s robust and varied and serves some of the finest food in the area during the short months that the establishment is open along the otherwise barren stretch of highway connecting Anchorage to Fairbanks. An authentic Bavarian menu is featured during Augtoberfest along with O’fest-themed specialty beers.

          Tickets for this no-miss event are $25 for the first day ($30 at the gate), $15 for the second day ($20 at the gate) or you can get a weekend pass for $35 ($40 at the gate). Surf out to 49statebrewing.com to get your tickets in advance and poke around for lodging at the same time.

          Another excellent fest that’s coming up is the 4th Annual Kenai Peninsula Beer Festival at the Soldotna Sports Center from 5-10 p.m. Oct. 9. Tickets are $30, which scores you eight four-ounce samples and a commemorative tasting glass. Yeah, I know, eight samples might seem a little paltry for a five-hour fest, but you can buy additional sampling tickets at two for $3 or $15 for 12.

          What really sets this fest apart is it may be the most casual and most disciplined beer event in the state. There never seems to be any bad karma at this laid-back gig that’s outside and appointed with all manner of food and craft booths and live music to keep things going. It feels like going to a Saturday market with a beer.

          Most of the Kenai Peninsula breweries will be on hand, including Kassik’s Brewery, Kenai River Brewing Company, St. Elias Brewing and maybe Homer Brewing Company as well. Of course, other breweries from across the state will be represented, as will national and especially Pacific Northwest beers provided by our local distributors.

          You can snag your tickets online at https://events.admitoneproducts.com/tkt_sales.php?test=trueevent_id=823214sales=. You’ll want to plan ahead as the fish are running and you might have to get creative for accommodations.

          Feeling really adventurous? Check out the Oct. 17-19 Yukon Beer Festival in Whitehorse. I’ve never been to a Canadian beer festival before, and this might be my first one. It’s distant, but probably no worse than driving to the Haines Beer Festival in May every year. Check out Yukon Beer Festival on Facebook for more information.

          At the same time, and much closer to home for me is the Eagle River Beer Festival at the Boys and Girls Club on Oct. 17-18. This is one of the rowdiest beer festivals in the Anchorage area, and I love the feel of it when I attend. The time and cost has not been announced, so keep your mug to the wall. Other events to keep an eye out for include Bodegafest in Anchorage and the Mighty Matanuska Beer Fest at the Alaska State Fairgrounds.

          The bottom line is that there’s no need to let your meat loaf and leave your mug idle. Make plans to get out there and support good local craft beer.

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