Browsing articles in "beer festivals"
Aug 12, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Beer Me!: Dover Downs’ Brew Festival on Saturday

When Dover Downs Hotel Casino first launched its craft beer-themed Brew Festival four years ago, there were about 1,800 craft breweries in the country. These days, there are more than 2,700 and the number keeps ticking up.

That same explosive growth is happening right here in Delaware with new breweries and beer festivals popping up every year.

The expansion of Delaware’s craft beer culture has been so rapid that Lindsey Timberman, the Pike Creek publisher of the Delaware Hop Scene website, can hardly keep up.

“It’s been insane. It’s neat to see, but it’s kind of mind-boggling,” says Timberman, who started the website with her boyfriend Eric Roberts in 2012. “We used to go to Philadelphia once a month, but we have no need to now because there is so much happening right here in Delaware. There is always something going on.”

POLL: Have you ever been to a beer festival?

For the Brew Festival in Dover, which runs Saturday Aug. 16 from 4-8 p.m., a record number of 1,000 people are expected. Each year, the number of attendees has grown right along with the beer scene in the First State, says George Fiorile, vice president and general manager of hotel operations at Dover Downs Hotel Casino.

Twenty-one breweries from across the country, including Delaware’s own 3rd Wave Brewing Company (Delmar), Fordham Old Dominion Breweries (Dover), 16 Mile Brewery (Georgetown), Twin Lakes Brewing Co. (Greenville), Mispillion River Brewing (Milford) and Dogfish Head Craft Brewery (Milton), will be represented. Nearly 100 different beers will be available for tasting.

For $25, beer lovers get 10 drink tickets and a souvenir glass for guzzling at the hotel’s Rollins Center, the 18,000-square-foot ballroom that hosts everything from concerts to boxing matches. (Designated drivers get in for $15 and get unlimited soda.)

The hotel’s chefs have also whipped up some off-centered finger foods to pair with the brews. There will be items like peanut butter and jelly waffles and “mac and cheese bombs” in three flavors, including feta and spinach, bacon burger and hot dog.

The hotel will also unveil a new concoction – a stout-battered waffle dog and it’s exactly what you think it is: waffle batter infused with a stout cooked around a hot dog.

In addition to the food and drink, Bear-based island folk/rock act The Splashing Pearlswill perform, giving the festivities a cool groove backdrop.

Fiorile says the decision to host a craft beer festival was a no-brainer due to its popularity in the state. Plus, it draws a crowd largely in the 25 to 35 age group, some of whom are checking out the hotel and casino for the first time.

With the fourth annual Brew Festival now joined by more than a dozen annual beer festivals across Delaware, it’s nearly a full-time job for Timberman to keep an up-to-date calendar of Delaware craft beer events on her website.

“Very rarely is there a day in the month when there is not something going on and that speaks volumes about the craft beer scene in Delaware. When we started, we had a Facebook page and hoped to get a couple of hundred people. We’re now up to 2,200 likes,” she says. “It’s a lot to keep up with, but it’s the coolest thing to keep up with because it’s fun.

“It’s beer. Who doesn’t like to talk about beer?”

IF YOU GO

What: Fourth annual Brew Festival

When: Aug. 16, 4-8 p.m.

Where: Dover Downs Hotel Casino, 1131 U.S. 13, Dover

Cost: $25 ($15 for designated drivers)

A TASTE OF DELAWARE’S BEER FESTIVALS

Sept. 6: Brews By the Bay in Lewes (www.delawarebrewers guild.org)

Sept. 6: Historic Odessa Brewfest (www.odessabrewfest .com)

Sept. 26: Brew at the Zoo Wine Too! at Brandywine Zoo (www.brandywinezoo.org)

Sept. 27: Harvest Hop Fest at World Cafe Live sat the Queen (www.queen.worldcafelive.com)

Oct. 4: River Towns Ride Festival in New Castle and Delaware City (www.rivertownsfestival.com)

Oct. 11: Delaware Beer and Wine Festival at the Delaware Agricultural Museum Village (www.delawarewineandbeer festival.com)

Nov. 1-8: Wilmington Beer Week (www.wilmingtonbeer week.com)

April 10-11, 2015: Delaware State Fair’s Triple Threat BBQ, Beer Music Festival (www.triplethreatbbq.net)

April 2015: Wilmington Craft Beer Festival at Santa Fe Wilmington

April 2015: Dewey Beach Brewfest at Gary’s Dewey Beach Grill (www.garysdeweybeachgrill.com)

April 2015: R2Hop2 Beer and Music Festival at Fordham Dominion Brewing (www.fordhamanddominion.com)

July 2015: Downtown Newark Food Brew Festival (www.newarkfoodandbrewfest.com)

July 2015: Smyrna Craft Beer, Wine Food Festival (www.smyrnafestival.com)

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Aug 11, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Letter: Well done for a great day

Could I congratulate the organisers of the Bobtown Beer Bash which was held last Saturday.

This is the first time we have attended this event and I can say we were pleasantly amazed as to how much thought and effort had gone into it – good beer selection, quick service, good food, spotlessly clean toilets and fantastic entertainment.

I understand that the funds raised go to worthy causes and perhaps to save the village community centre from decay and degradation.

I am in no doubt that all the pubs and clubs do very well in the shadow of your hard efforts, so not only is it causes you support, you do well for all mankind that flocks to the village each year. Without your efforts, it would have been another quiet, hot Saturday in an unknown backwater.

You’ve put Bobtown on the map.

Oh and I must say, in 30 years of visiting beer festivals up and down the continent, this is the only festival that I have sampled cold beer and cider, and not warm and tepid concoctions, which is nothing short of a miracle with temperatures in the 80s.

Nice one Beer Bash organisers!

Andrew Johnson

Mirfield

Send your letters to dewsbury.editorial@jpress.co.uk or Reporter Series, Floor 5, 26 Whitehall Road, Leeds, LS12 1BE

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Aug 10, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Take Your Pick of Beer Fests

Here’s a stupid question—can Portlanders get enough beer? Of course not, as demonstrated by the sheer number of beer festivals this town holds. There’s one happening now—the Portland International Beerfest, taking place at Holladay Park by the Lloyd Center, while next weekend is the Imperial IPA Fest at Saraveza and their Bad Habit event space.

The International Beerfest, running today and tomorrow, actually has a lot of American beers, covering everything from barley wine to porters, though the real point is to get into the foreign beers. Not surprisingly Germany is well represented (lots of lagers but some interesting looking ales too) and there’s a lot of Belgium ale as well. The rest is an adventurous miscellany of Austrian, Canadian, Polish, Dutch, New Zealand, Czech, French and English beers with the odd cider. Watch out for Scottish brewery BrewDog who are known for their robust ales—their Tokio stout weighs in at a festival winning 18.2% ABV. Portland International Beerfest, Saturday Sunday, $25 (inc. 10 beer tickets). Full information is available here

Smaller in scale but with a more neighborhood feel, the Imperial IPA Fest is now in its fifth year and features 40-plus rotating taps of IPA, much of it rare or brewed especially for the fest (the likes of Block 15, Base Camp Brewing Co, Coalition, Gigantic and Solera will all be debuting exclusives). There is also a short list of regional Berliner Weisse on draft and the infamous double bacon BLT makes a return. 5th Annual IIPA Festival, August 16 17, Saraveza and Saraveza’s Bad Habit Room at 1004 N. Killingsworth, $20 (inc. glass and 10 drink tickets)

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Aug 10, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Beer Me!: Dover Downs’ Brew Festival next weekend

When Dover Downs Hotel Casino first launched its craft beer-themed Brew Festival four years ago, there were about 1,800 craft breweries in the country. These days, there are more than 2,700 and the number keeps ticking up.

That same explosive growth is happening right here in Delaware with new breweries and beer festivals popping up every year.

The expansion of Delaware’s craft beer culture has been so rapid that Lindsey Timberman, the Pike Creek publisher of the Delaware Hop Scene website, can hardly keep up.

“It’s been insane. It’s neat to see, but it’s kind of mind-boggling,” says Tim

berman, who started the website with her boyfriend Eric Roberts in 2012. “We used to go to Philadelphia once a month, but we have no need to now because there is so much happening right here in Delaware. There is always something going on.”

POLL: Have you ever been to a beer festival?

For next weekend’s Brew Festival in Dover, which runs Aug. 16 from 4-8 p.m., a record number of 1,000 people are expected. Each year, the number of attendees has grown right along with the beer scene in the First State, says George Fiorile, vice president and general manager of hotel operations at Dover Downs Hotel Casino.

Twenty-one breweries from across the country, including Delaware’s own 3rd Wave Brewing Company (Delmar), Fordham Old Dominion Breweries (Dover), 16 Mile Brewery (Georgetown), Twin Lakes Brewing Co. (Greenville), Mispillion River Brewing (Milford) and Dogfish Head Craft Brewery (Milton), will be represented. Nearly 100 different beers will be available for tasting.

For $25, beer lovers get 10 drink tickets and a souvenir glass for guzzling at the hotel’s Rollins Center, the 18,000-square-foot ballroom that hosts everything from concerts to boxing matches. (Designated drivers get in for $15 and get unlimited soda.)

The hotel’s chefs have also whipped up some off-centered finger foods to pair with the brews. There will be items like peanut butter and jelly waffles and “mac and cheese bombs” in three flavors, including feta and spinach, bacon burger and hot dog.

The hotel will also unveil a new concoction – a stout-battered waffle dog and it’s exactly what you think it is: waffle batter infused with a stout cooked around a hot dog.

In addition to the food and drink, Bear-based island folk/rock act The Splashing Pearlswill perform, giving the festivities a cool groove backdrop.

Fiorile says the decision to host a craft beer festival was a no-brainer due to its popularity in the state. Plus, it draws a crowd largely in the 25 to 35 age group, some of whom are checking out the hotel and casino for the first time.

With the fourth annual Brew Festival now joined by more than a dozen annual beer festivals across Delaware, it’s nearly a full-time job for Timberman to keep an up-to-date calendar of Delaware craft beer events on her website.

“Very rarely is there a day in the month when there is not something going on and that speaks volumes about the craft beer scene in Delaware. When we started, we had a Facebook page and hoped to get a couple of hundred people. We’re now up to 2,200 likes,” she says. “It’s a lot to keep up with, but it’s the coolest thing to keep up with because it’s fun.

“It’s beer. Who doesn’t like to talk about beer?”

IF YOU GO

What: Fourth annual Brew Festival

When: Aug. 16, 4-8 p.m.

Where: Dover Downs Hotel Casino, 1131 U.S. 13, Dover

Cost: $25 ($15 for designated drivers)

A TASTE OF DELAWARE’S BEER FESTIVALS

Sept. 6: Brews By the Bay in Lewes (www.delawarebrewers guild.org)

Sept. 6: Historic Odessa Brewfest (www.odessabrewfest .com)

Sept. 26: Brew at the Zoo Wine Too! at Brandywine Zoo (www.brandywinezoo.org)

Sept. 27: Harvest Hop Fest at World Cafe Live sat the Queen (www.queen.worldcafelive.com)

Oct. 4: River Towns Ride Festival in New Castle and Delaware City (www.rivertownsfestival.com)

Oct. 11: Delaware Beer and Wine Festival at the Delaware Agricultural Museum Village (www.delawarewineandbeer festival.com)

Nov. 1-8: Wilmington Beer Week (www.wilmingtonbeer week.com)

April 10-11, 2015: Delaware State Fair’s Triple Threat BBQ, Beer Music Festival (www.triplethreatbbq.net)

April 2015: Wilmington Craft Beer Festival at Santa Fe Wilmington

April 2015: Dewey Beach Brewfest at Gary’s Dewey Beach Grill (www.garysdeweybeachgrill.com)

April 2015: R2Hop2 Beer and Music Festival at Fordham Dominion Brewing (www.fordhamanddominion.com)

July 2015: Downtown Newark Food Brew Festival (www.newarkfoodandbrewfest.com)

July 2015: Smyrna Craft Beer, Wine Food Festival (www.smyrnafestival.com)

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Aug 10, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Dover Downs preparing for Beer Festival

DOVER, Del. — When Dover Downs Hotel Casino first launched its craft beer-themed Brew Festival four years ago, there were about 1,800 craft breweries in the country. These days, there are more than 2,700 and the number keeps ticking up.

That same explosive growth is happening right here in Delaware with new breweries and beer festivals popping up every year.

The expansion of Delaware’s craft beer culture has been so rapid that Lindsey Timberman, the Pike Creek publisher of the Delaware Hop Scene website, can hardly keep up.

“It’s been insane. It’s neat to see, but it’s kind of mind-boggling,” says Timberman, who started the website with her boyfriend Eric Roberts in 2012. “We used to go to Philadelphia once a month, but we have no need to now because there is so much happening right here in Delaware. There is always something going on.”

For next weekend’s Brew Festival in Dover, which runs Aug. 16 from 4-8 p.m., a record number of 1,000 people are expected. Each year, the number of attendees has grown right along with the beer scene in the First State, says George Fiorile, vice president and general manager of hotel operations at Dover Downs Hotel Casino.

Twenty-one breweries from across the country, including Delaware’s own 3rd Wave Brewing Company (Delmar), Fordham Old Dominion Breweries (Dover), 16 Mile Brewery (Georgetown), Twin Lakes Brewing Co. (Greenville), Mispillion River Brewing (Milford) and Dogfish Head Craft Brewery (Milton), will be represented. Nearly 100 different beers will be available for tasting.

For $25, beer lovers get 10 drink tickets and a souvenir glass for guzzling at the hotel’s Rollins Center, the 18,000-square-foot ballroom that hosts everything from concerts to boxing matches. (Designated drivers get in for $15 and get unlimited soda.)

The hotel’s chefs have also whipped up some off-centered finger foods to pair with the brews. There will be items like peanut butter and jelly waffles and “mac and cheese bombs” in three flavors, including feta and spinach, bacon burger and hot dog.

The hotel will also unveil a new concoction – a stout-battered waffle dog and it’s exactly what you think it is: waffle batter infused with a stout cooked around a hot dog.

In addition to the food and drink, Bear-based island folk/rock act The Splashing Pearls will perform, giving the festivities a cool groove backdrop.

Fiorile says the decision to host a craft beer festival was a no-brainer due to its popularity in the state. Plus, it draws a crowd largely in the 25 to 35 age group, some of whom are checking out the hotel and casino for the first time.

With the fourth annual Brew Festival now joined by more than a dozen annual beer festivals across Delaware, it’s nearly a full-time job for Timberman to keep an up-to-date calendar of Delaware craft beer events on her website.

“Very rarely is there a day in the month when there is not something going on and that speaks volumes about the craft beer scene in Delaware. When we started, we had a Facebook page and hoped to get a couple of hundred people. We’re now up to 2,200 likes,” she says. “It’s a lot to keep up with, but it’s the coolest thing to keep up with because it’s fun.

“It’s beer. Who doesn’t like to talk about beer?”

___

Information from: The News Journal of Wilmington, Del., http://www.delawareonline.com

Copyright 2014 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

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Aug 10, 2014
Freddie Kitson

The best beer festivals in London this summer

14:43 06 August 2014


Feeling thirsty? We tell you where to find the perfect pint in London this summer (Photo by Johannes Simon/Getty Images)

2011 Getty Images

The sun is shining, the birds are singing, and brewers from across the world are descending on London with top-quality beers. We tell you where to grab a pint – or several – in London this summer.


CAMRA’s Great British Beer Festival will be transforming Kensington Olympia into the grandest beer hall in the country! (Photo by Bruno Vincent/Getty Images)

British Craft Beer Challenge – UK Vs the Commonwealth – Saturday 9 August

This Saturday, London Fields Brewery’s Hackney Brewhouse is taking inspiration from the Glasgow games. They’ve got four UK breweries – London Fields, Five Points, Magic Rock, and Brewdog – going head to head “with over 40 mouth-watering colonial beers from countries such as India, Australia, Canada New Zealand”.

They say, “never fear if you are no fan of beer,” for there will be a commonwealth-inspired cocktail corner, and international food from Caribbean jerk chicken to classic Aussie barbecue. To enjoy under the Brewhouse’s iconic railway arches.

London Beer City hopes to cheekily incorporate the GBBF and London Craft Beer Festival to throw a beer-based party that will take over the whole city!

London Beer City – 9 – 16 August

If it seems like all of the beer festivals are coming to town on the same week, you’re right. London Beer City are fully aware that they’re sharing the bill with the GBBF and London Craft Beer Festival, and see it as a collaboration, not a competition.

They aim to celebrate London’s beer renaissance, apparently by concentrating as much of the amber nectar in the city as possible. This weeklong event takes place at venues scattered from Carshalton in the South to Barnet in the north, and from Windsor in the West to Stratford in the East, aiming to put something within the reach of all Londoners.

As well as copious amounts of drinking to be done, there are also some more unusual events on offer. DJs from iconic record label Rough Trade will be staging a takeover, and Islington’s the Earl of Essex will be hosting a ‘live brew’ using ingredients foraged by you, members of the public, on Monday 11 August.

London Oktoberfest prmoises traditional Bavarian food and service in a tent big enough for 3,300 people! [Photo courtesy of Oktoberfest]

Great British Beer Festival by CAMRA - Tuesday 12 – Saturday 16 August

These guys know what they’re doing. The Campaign For Real Ale do not mess about. They’re taking over the magnificent Olympia exhibition centre with over 900 different types of beer, cider, and perry. Sounds overwhelming? Don’t worry, they’ve developed the GBBF Beer Selector, a magical machine that will choose your beers for you based on your mood, tastes, and how drunk you want to get.

There will be a range of bands performing, and every kind of food you can think of, including, of course, beer festival favourites like hog roast, pork scratchings, hot dogs, pies and cheese.

London Craft Beer Festival – Thursday 14 – Sunday 17 August

The new kids on the block, these east London guys have clearly taken some marketing classes and have hit upon their Unique Selling Point: the beer is unlimited. Now, don’t get carried away: there’ll be no lying open-mouthed under casks. Your £35 ticket gets you four ‘thirds’ of a pint, allowing you to have a proper taste of four different beers, then you’re eligible for unlimited 90ml ‘pours’ – meaning you could taste all the beers on offer from 24 of the world’s best brewers! Well, if you’ve got a strong enough stomach, that is… When you need something to soak up all that booze, the Oval Space and Bethnal Green will be full of delicious food, from Ginger Pig butchers, the Ham Cheese Co, Jerk Chicken and some intriguing international chaps calling themselves the Flemish Kitchen Rebels… If it wasn’t sounding cool enough already, Gentlemans Dub Club, Ghostpoet, and Man Like Me will all be performing. We can’t wait!

Beer By The River – Saturday 30 August

If you fancy getting out of the city, head down to Morden Hall Park for Beer By The River. This gorgeous National Trust property is opening up for a day of hop-based frolics on August 30. This one is family-friendly, with a funfair, bouncy castle, and a petting zoo for kids. Think less east London hipster, and more traditional, with haybale seating and an unpretentious atmosphere.

If you’re a budding brewer yourself, you can even enter their homebrew competition, and pick up some tips on how to make your own booze!

Oktoberfest – 18 – 21 September, 25 – 28 September, 2 – 5 October, 9 – 12 October

I know what you’re thinking. Obviously, Oktoberfest is in October. How can it be included in a list of London’s best summer beer festivals? Well, those crazy Germans have decided to bring their delicious beer to the UK early, so we can get a taste from September 18. We class that as ‘late summer’, and hopefully the weather will agree with us.

As well as great beer and classic German food (no beer fest is complete without sausages in some form), the band behind cheesy nineties hit Cotton Eye Joe will be performing on Thursday 18 September.

The Bavarian-style beerfest hits Kennington Park from September 18 -21 and September 25 – 28, before moving to Millwall Park for October 2 – 5 and October 9 – 12.

If you really want to get involved with the German vibe, the website is even offering lederhosen! Wunderbar!

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Aug 5, 2014
Freddie Kitson

This Box-Office Data Reveals Americans’ Sweet, Weird Tastes

What makes Americans tick? In the 19th century, the best insights came from globe-trotting know-it-all Alexis de Toqueville. In the 20th century, the baton passed to legendary pollsters such as George Gallup. Now there’s a new way to decode Americans’ tastes:  analyzing what types of festivals, lectures and public mischief are becoming box-office hits.

A nifty listening post is San Francisco-based Eventbrite, which makes money by selling tickets to practically anything. As new trends take off — whether they involve boy bands or mud races — organizers are increasingly likely to use Eventbrite to handle their online ticket sales.

“You can’t make up some of the stuff we’re seeing,” says Eventbrite’s chief executive officer, Kevin Hartz. His company handles more than $1 billion in ticket sales a year, spread across dozens of major categories. “We’re interacting with millions of participants, all driven by this desire to be connected with other people,” Hartz explains.

ADMIT ONE  -- happy pride!!! : san francisco (...

At FORBES’s urging, Eventbrite officials culled their ticket sales since 2012, spotlighting six major trends and an assortment of oddities. The results are every bit as sweet and weird as one might expect. Americans are eager to support charitable causes, especially if they can do so by running around in strange clothes and getting splattered with paint. We’re increasingly becoming a nation of feminists … or, perhaps, beer drinkers. Americans will pay money to learn about new technology — and even more money to escape it.

Details are as follows:

  1. Women’s Conferences. Eventbrite says it has seen a 140% increase in conferences geared toward women since 2010. This surge includes empowerment conferences for female entrepreneurs, philanthropists, advertisers, bloggers, innovators, foodies, women in tech  and  lesbians in tech. Shaherose Charania, who oversees dozens of networking events for Women 2.0, says her group’s meet-ups have taken off because they provide an “authentic place” for aspiring female entrepreneurs to share tips and tactics, without feeling pressured by some outside organizer’s agenda.
  2. Beer Festivals. Thanks to the craft beer movement, there now are more than 900 beer festivals in the U.S. annually. Eventbrite sells tickets for many of them, as well as for lesser beer events, too. In the past two years, Eventbrite says it has experienced a 250% boost in U.S. beer events, to more than 6,000. Among them is SF Beer Week, held in San Francisco aboard a World War II-era ship: S.S. Jeremiah O’Brian, that sits on the bay near Fisherman’s Wharf. Conference organizer Brian Stechschulte says “the event sells out each year and 1,500 people attend.”
  3. Color Runs. Themed runs on Eventbrite have increased 100% since 2012. The hottest of them all, says Eventbrite spokesperson Michelle Masek, are “color runs. It seems people just love to dress in head-to-toe white and get splashed with colored paint or powder as they run. Others themed runs include everything from Turkey Trots to Zombie runs to Santa jogs.”
  4. Music Festivals. Eventbrite in 2013 ticketed 60,000 concerts and festivals, a 50% increase from 2012. These included Governor’s Ball in New York City, the Hangout music festival in Alabama, and Wanderlust, a combination yoga and music festival held in multiple cities.
  5. Events for Causes. Masek says events with a fundraising twist “continue to be popular — from bar nights to themed runs to concerts. We’ve seen a 40% increase in the number of charity and fundraiser events on Eventbrite since 2012.”
  6. Summer Camps/ Adult Getaways. Camp isn’t just for children and teens anymore. Adults are flocking to summer getaways packed with pool parties, hiking and arts crafts, particularly as a way of disconnecting completely from smartphones, voice mail and the rest of the daily grind. Notable examples include Digital Detoxes and Yes and Yes Yes,  a highly unstructured get-together in Palm Springs, Calif.

What would Toqueville make of this? He probably would buy tickets to lots of these events — just to verify his early hunches about the American character. As the French traveler wrote in his 1835 classic, Democracy in America: “Americans of all ages, all conditions, all minds constantly unite. Not only do they have commercial and industrial associations in which all take part, but they also have a thousand other kinds . . . Americans use associations to give fêtes, to found seminaries, to build inns, to raise churches, to distribute books, to send missionaries to the antipodes.”

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Aug 5, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Understanding Beer: Glassware, Smell, and OC Beer

snifter.jpgPhoto by Cleo TobbiSnifty!

Most people order a beer by asking for a “pint,” a “glass” or even just “one.” But while it may look pretentious to ask for a goblet or tulip glass for your favorite Belgian, these glassware options aren’t just for show. Most American-style beer, like American pale ales or ambers, don’t need fancy stemware, but everything from steins to snifters have a place in the beer world, and every savvy beer drinker should understand why these different glasses will enhance your beer drinking experience.

First thing to keep in mind is that the entire point of these different styles of glasses is that they all affect the aroma of the beer. According to The Smell and Taste Treatment and Research Foundation, “approximately 90 percent of taste is smell,” so do your taste buds a favor and sniff before you chug. Also, try not to fill your beer to the brim. We all love a full glass, but that’s how those beautiful notes and esters drift off before you get a good whiff.

Now for the glassware.

shaker_glass.jpgPhoto by Cleo Tobbi:(

The shaker glass: A surprise, the shaker glass should hardly be used for beer. This mold of glassware got its name from the cocktail shaker, which bartenders would jam together with the shaker glass and mix your Mai Thai. At some point, bartenders started serving craft beer in them and others have followed suite. Due to the narrower base and straight rim, the aroma becomes sweltered, ultimately affecting the overall taste of the beer. Ninety percent, remember?

Recommended OC beer: If you don’t have a choice, shoot for the Palomino Pale Ale from Bootleggers Brewery.

snifter_glass.jpgPhoto by Tim PierceNot just for the hard stuff!

The stemmed tulip: Named the “best of all the worlds” by Randy Mosher, author of Tasting Beer: An Insider’s Guide to the World’s Greatest Drink, for the glass’ inward tapered lip and wide base. Like a wine glass, the stemmed tulip glass lends to the aroma of the beer, concentrating it for the ultimate drinking experience. Could you use a wine glass, you ask? Sure. These days, with pricey bourbon barrel-aged imperial stouts and sours aged in wine barrels, craft beer has shifted away from its blue-collar connotation, so don’t be afraid to get a little fancy with your glass too. In fact, the Teku glass, seen at Native Son Alehouse, is nothing more than an angular wine glass.

Recommended OC beer: Fifth Symphony Saison from Pizza Port Brewing Co.

goblet_bottle_logic.jpgPhoto by Cleo TobbiBring me my goblet!

Goblet: Similar to the tulip, sans curved lip, the goblet is another option to aid in tasting your brew. Because of the wider top and narrow base, the best aspect of the goblet is the stem. A stem is there to prevent the heat from your hand to alter the temperature of the drink you’re holding.

Recommended OC beer: Holy Cow, a milk stout with green curry, from Bottle Logic Brewing

Tapered Pilsner glass: Born in the Czech Republic, this shape of glass is made for Pilsners. The tall, tapered glass, is meant to observe the clear color Pilsners are known for. This style of glass also helps keep a thick, frothy head.

Recommended OC beer: Pistol Whip’d from Noble Ale Works

Snifter glass: We know this glass from our scotch-drinking, but these tiny glasses also act as perfect tasting vessels for flights, bottle shares and beer festivals. Acting like a miniature tulip glass, the snifter carries the liquid in its wider base while pushing those beautiful aromas and esters up through the narrower top.

Recommended OC beer: Sucre 6th Anniversary Ale from The Bruery

Follow Stick a Fork In It on Twitter @ocweeklyfood or on Facebook! And don’t forget to download our free Best Of App here!

You can also follow Cleo Tobbi on Twitter @CleoTobbi.

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