Browsing articles in "food cart"
Feb 25, 2015
Jim Benson

Food cart owners puzzled by bizarre SE Portland burglary

PORTLAND, OR (KPTV) -

Several food carts on SE 52nd and Foster were burglarized before they opened Tuesday morning, and the thieves made off with some bizarre items.

“My padlocks were laying on the ground, and some food was taken, [my wife's] orange juice was taken and left down at the barbeque cart, so they must have been thirsty,” said Kenney Goss, the owner of Happy Espresso.

Goss said his ham and pastrami were also taken, along with a smart phone used for running credit and debit cards.

Happy Espresso, Yakisoba Noodle, Roadrunner Bar-B-Q and J Mo’s Sandwich Shack were all targeted; in most cases, locks were cut and the carts were ransacked.

The owner of Roadrunner Bar-B-Q told Fox 12 the thieves just took quarters from her till, but nothing else.

The “Carts on Foster” were dealt a tough blow back in the fall, when someone cut the commercial power cords running to most of the carts in the pod, causing hundreds of dollars in damage and lost revenue.

Police responded to take a report and get fingerprints early Tuesday, and some cart owners told Fox 12 they’d be adding their own surveillance cameras as a little extra insurance going forward.

Winter is already a tough time to make your living running a food cart, and many of these owners have been targeted before. So now their message is clear:

“We’re watching out for you, we’ve got cameras out,” Goss added. “Don’t be surprised if somebody’s going to be watching this – we’d love to catch you.”

Copyright 2015 KPTV-KPDX Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved.

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Feb 24, 2015
Jim Benson

Glen Ellyn approves new food cart regulations, reduces proposed fee

Glen Ellyn has approved new regulations for downtown food carts, but trustees clashed with police officials about background checks on employees working those carts.

Trustees voted 5-1 on Feb. 23 to green light rules that require food cart owners to pay a $150 permit fee plus a $50 criminal background check on each employee over 18 years old. The ordinance limits the number of downtown food carts to three a year, prohibits music, balloons and similar advertising, and allows for one additional attachment, such as a cooler. Carts only can sell food and drink, and not any type of merchandise.

The proposed ordinance called for a $250 permit fee, which included the cost of up to two background checks on all workers, regardless of age. But the majority of the board was reticent to heap that kind of scrutiny on underage employees.

Such a policy particularly affects Erik Anderson, owner of the Sunset Slush food cart that debuted in 2014. Anderson said he wanted to use his cart to provide summer job opportunities for local teens, noting that he employed six high-school students last year and several more were interested in working this year.

“I would just hate for the cost for me to become prohibitive,” Anderson said, arguing that a food cart like his poses less risk. “While we are on wheels, it weighs 700 pounds. We’re not easily mobile, we’re right out on Main Street, half a block from the police station.”

Trustees largely sided with Anderson.

“It feels a little heavy-handed,” Trustee Tim Elliott said. “I don’t have a problem with checking the adults. I get it, we’d be safer if everyone was fingerprinted, but that argument never ends.”

“I’m not sure I can rationalize the idea of fingerprinting juveniles for that kind of position,” Trustee Dean Clark said. “I’m just not seeing the necessity.”

But Police Chief Phil Norton countered that the village can and should know the criminal backgrounds of anyone staffing food carts, particularly since they tend to attract children.

“There is an element of bad people out there that like to go where the kids are,” Norton said. “We have (to) make sure that never happens. We have to be very careful.”

Trustee Diane McGinley added that she felt these businesses would be thorough enough to do their own checks on anyone they employ.

“I don’t think anyone would willingly hire somebody that could not be trusted,” McGinley said. “It’s a major investment for any cart.”

Norton said that not all business owners are always so vigilant and that the public needs protection even from juveniles, who he said comprise a significant number of offenders in crimes against children.

“Why not make it as safe as possible?” Norton said. “There’s a cost to doing business anywhere you go. I don’t think it’s our responsibility to reduce that to the point where maybe it’s not good for the people of the community.”

Trustee Jim Burket was the lone objector to the reduced fee, agreeing that people working with and around children should be closely monitored.

“It’s just the way things are these days,” Burket said, adding he submitted to a background check as a youth lacrosse coach.

Heavenly Hot Dogs cart owner Joe Snellgrove told trustees that his two employees are college students and previously said he felt the tighter regulations were fair.

The application deadline for a permit for this summer season is March 1, Planning Director Staci Hulseberg said.

cdrhodes@tribpub.com

@rhodes_dawn

Copyright © 2015, Chicago Tribune

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Feb 23, 2015
Jim Benson

Talking Business: Longview’s first food cart, Eaterations, opens across …

Judging by the line of customers that formed immediately upon opening Thursday evening, you may already know about Eaterations.

But did you know its chef trained at Portland’s Le Cordon Bleu culinary school?

Or that it’s Longview’s first food cart?

Those inside the gourmet food cart — which will be stationary in the parking lot at 11th Avenue and Hudson Street — aim to be more than a novel way of getting grub.

“We’re here to serve the best food in the county, if not the best food in the state at some point,” chef Joel Loveall said last week.

Eaterations had its soft opening Feb. 12 with a limited menu featuring a robust top sirloin burger with the works, Thai-infused nachos and bacon-enhanced mac’n’cheese — plus changing daily specials.

It’s all fresh and it’s all handmade, Loveall said — there isn’t even a freezer in the food truck’s kitchen.


Buy Now

Loveall readies one of Eaterations’ first offerings, mac’n'cheese featuring bowtie noodles, bacon, Tillamook cheese and arugula, for Thursday’s first customer.

“It’s literally culinary perfection every day,” said Loveall, 32, taking from the food cart’s motto and the definition of its name: “Food created from the constant pursuit of culinary perfection.”

Eaterations formed out of a kind of synergy with Ashtown Brewing, across Hudson Street from the food truck. The taproom there allows people to bring in their own food since the brewery doesn’t serve sustenance with the suds. Ashtown co-founder Jarrett Skreen’s parents saw the potential and got to work on the food truck last year.

There weren’t any brick-and-mortar locations nearby that could cater to the hungry hop-heads, so Jon and Melanie Skreen made the smaller investment of a food cart to dish out big flavors.

Then again, it’s not just for the brewery crowd — it’s to-go food for everyone looking for something new, and eventually familiar.

Melanie Skreen said the food cart is figuring out its hours in relation to where demand is, though they’ll likely be around Wednesdays through Fridays in the evening and Saturday afternoons.

There are dreams to eventually put in outdoor seating, be able to put in food orders at Ashtown and even set up a second, mobile food cart. But for now, it’s one day at a time.

“It’s going to be a learning experience for all of us,” Skreen said.

And with luck, the community will learn to love it.

Eaterations can be found at 11th Avenue and Hudson Street in Longview Wednesday through Friday evenings and in the afternoon on Saturdays. Find them on Facebook or at www.eaterations.com.

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Feb 23, 2015
Jim Benson

Talking Business: Longview’s first food cart open for business

Judging by the line of customers that formed immediately upon opening Thursday evening, you may already know about Eaterations.

But did you know its chef trained at Portland’s Le Cordon Bleu culinary school?

Or that it’s Longview’s first food cart?

Those inside the gourmet food cart — which will be stationary in the parking lot at 11th Avenue and Hudson Street — aim to be more than a novel way of getting grub.

“We’re here to serve the best food in the county, if not the best food in the state at some point,” chef Joel Loveall said last week.

Eaterations had its soft opening Feb. 12 with a limited menu featuring a robust top sirloin burger with the works, Thai-infused nachos and bacon-enhanced mac’n’cheese — plus changing daily specials.

It’s all fresh and it’s all handmade, Loveall said — there isn’t even a freezer in the food truck’s kitchen.


Buy Now

Loveall readies one of Eaterations’ first offerings, mac’n'cheese featuring bowtie noodles, bacon, Tillamook cheese and arugula, for Thursday’s first customer.

“It’s literally culinary perfection every day,” said Loveall, 32, taking from the food cart’s motto and the definition of its name: “Food created from the constant pursuit of culinary perfection.”

Eaterations formed out of a kind of synergy with Ashtown Brewing, across Hudson Street from the food truck. The taproom there allows people to bring in their own food since the brewery doesn’t serve sustenance with the suds. Ashtown co-founder Jarrett Skreen’s parents saw the potential and got to work on the food truck last year.

There weren’t any brick-and-mortar locations nearby that could cater to the hungry hop-heads, so Jon and Melanie Skreen made the smaller investment of a food cart to dish out big flavors.

Then again, it’s not just for the brewery crowd — it’s to-go food for everyone looking for something new, and eventually familiar.

Melanie Skreen said the food cart is figuring out its hours in relation to where demand is, though they’ll likely be around Wednesdays through Fridays in the evening and Saturday afternoons.

There are dreams to eventually put in outdoor seating, be able to put in food orders at Ashtown and even set up a second, mobile food cart. But for now, it’s one day at a time.

“It’s going to be a learning experience for all of us,” Skreen said.

And with luck, the community will learn to love it.

Eaterations can be found at 11th Avenue and Hudson Street in Longview Wednesday through Friday evenings and in the afternoon on Saturdays. Find them on Facebook or at www.eaterations.com.

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Feb 22, 2015
Jim Benson

NYC Turf – Not Middle East – at Issue in Kosher vs. Halal Food Carts War

NYC Turf – Not Middle East – at Issue in Kosher vs. Halal Food Carts War

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Holy Rollers, a glatt kosher food cart in Midtown West, Manhattan

Holy Rollers, a glatt kosher food cart in Midtown West, Manhattan
Photo Credit: Joshua Nass

The idea was just too tempting. When there were reports of territorial animosity and whose “higher authority” was really higher as between Halal-observant Muslim food cart vendors and a Kashrut-observant Jewish food cart vendor, the need to cast the animosity as reflecting the Middle East conflict was too strong for some  to resist.

But in order to help avoid a real religious conflict where none currently exists, The Jewish Press is happy to report the facts in the New York mid-town food cart war.

And what it boils down to is some people play dirty. And sometimes they play dirty simply because that’s who they are, not what they are.

Let’s start at the beginning.

Yisroel Mordowitz owns the kosher meat food cart, “Holy Rollers Kosher Cart.” He used to be located in the Queens borough of New York City. A food cart vendor friend of his left a location in Midtown which Mordowitz knew would be spectacular for his cart. After six months during which the “prime” Midtown spot remained vacant, Mordowitz rolled his cart near Rockefeller Center in Manhattan, at 48th Street and 6th Avenue. That happened about ten days ago.

And that’s when the turf battle began.

Mordowitz and his Holy Rollers cart became the object of intense intimidation. Those menacing him were Egyptian Halal food cart owners. Halal is the standard of food preparation required of observant Muslims. Although observant Muslims can eat Kosher food, observant Jews are not able to eat Halal, as the Kashrut requirements are stricter and more extensive.

The competition would show up before Mordowitz arrived, and blockade the curb where he had set up his cart the day before. Then his competitors blocked the space with umbrellas and beverage cartons, just to ensure that the Holy Rollers cart could not serve customers there.  The Halal cart owners complained Mordowitz was interfering with their business, even though those who flocked to the Holy Rollers could not eat Halal-certified meat.

There are many Halal vendors in New York City, but, according to Mordowitz, Holy Rollers Kosher Cart is the only glatt Kosher meat food cart in all of New York City.

There is no “right,” under New York City law, for vendors to “own” certain locations, so the vendors blocking Mordowitz had no legal position. But they were intimidating.

Mordowitz told The Jewish Press that one early morning when he showed up to set up his cart at the 48th and 6th Avenue spot and it was already blockaded, his partner, Yosef Salzbank, went looking for another location nearby. Wherever Salzbank went, Mordowitz said, a Jeep Cherokee would glide up alongside, with its occupants yelling at him to keep moving.

It was too much for these Holy Rollers.

After about a week of trying to make it in Midtown, Mordowitz and his partners relocated to 35th Street and 9th Avenue, which is west of Midtown. The Holy Rollers Kosher Cart is stationed right outside of BH Electronics, and lines formed down the block.

Yisroel Mordowitz outside his Holy Rollers Kosher Cart, Feb. 18, 2015.

Yisroel Mordowitz outside his Holy Rollers Kosher Cart, Feb. 18, 2015.

People had gotten a taste of the real thing, and they were willing to travel to get it.

Holy Rollers sells glatt Kosher meat sandwiches with names from the Bible, and apparently it’s divinely delectable. Saul Bienenfeld, an attorney who lives in Cedarhurst but works in Manhattan, spoke with The Jewish Press on Thursday from the Holy Rollers’ new site at 35th and 9th.

Bienenfeld said he was thrilled to find a glatt Kosher food cart in New York City. He was disappointed Holy Rollers had to move locations, but he was ready to walk the distance because of the quality of the food.

About the Author: Lori Lowenthal Marcus is the US correspondent for The Jewish Press. She is a recovered lawyer who previously practiced First Amendment law and taught in Philadelphia-area graduate and law schools. You can reach her by email: Lori@JewishPressOnline.com

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11 Responses to “NYC Turf – Not Middle East – at Issue in Kosher vs. Halal Food Carts War”

  1. ******* hallal morons…..

  2. Sad case of ethnic intimidation, which seems to be still legal in the United States

  3. Who wants second best when one can get thee best just around the corner? After all, Kosher are God’s guidelines.

  4. Manhattan is the 4th holiest spot for Muslims after Jerusalem, Mecca and Medine…

  5. It is condoned by the regime of Sheikh Oblunder of Obamastan, and his version of Heinrich Himmler, Eric Holder…but only when the protesters are from the favored (and immune) minority groups: Blacks, Latinos and – of course! – Oblunder’s fellow Muslims.

  6. I salivate for the day when blacks and Muslims compete for something of this nature and Holder/Obama must intervene.

  7. I salivate for the day when blacks and Muslims compete for something of this nature and Holder/Obama must intervene.

  8. I am a complete vegetarian, and hate eating mutton when I imagine doing “bêêê” before being beheaded

  9. I’D COME AND PARTAKE IN YOUR FOOD~~~ BUT TEXAS IS QUITE A DISTANCE. GOD BLESS AND KEEP UP THE GOOD WORK!!

  10. Not a single post about a hilal restaurant on any of your post? hmmmm

  11. All I can say about Halal food is that when I passed the Halal butcher shop in Jerusalem, it was the first time I had heard about it. (That was close to 40 years ago). There were flies all over the meat, and it was sitting outdoors. It was disgusting, to say the least.
    On the other hand, I once read a newspaper article about a Kosher butcher who partnered with a Halal butcher. Their stores were back to back, so you went down one street to one of their places, or you would go to the next block for the other. I believe the city was Hoboken NJ.

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Feb 21, 2015
Jim Benson

Midtown Kosher/Halal Food Cart Fight Is Real Life "Palestinian Chicken"

21515intifooda.jpg
Today’s NY Post cover

Wedged between important EXPOSÉS on Bill Clinton’s SEX LIFE and HOT TAKES on the LIBERAL LIES of Jon Stewart, the NY Post stumbled upon a bitter turf battle between Kosher and Halal carts in Midtown which is straight out of Curb Your Enthusiasm. In which case, does this make the NY Post social assassins?

Jewish food cart Holy Rollers set up shop near Rockefeller Center, on 48th Street off Sixth Avenue, last Monday. But apparently, a halal cart run by a group of Egyptians isn’t too happy about them getting in on their location. Now the two sides are locked in “a veritable falafel fatwa.”

“This guy is hungry — hungry for money,” bellowed 48th Street Sabrett-slinger Mohamed Mossad, who along with nearly a dozen others successfully kept [Yisroel] Mordowitz off the block. “I have a family, too!”

“Why doesn’t he go to 47th Street?” Mossad shouted, referring to the Hasidim-heavy Diamond District. “He’s just coming to this particular spot, and he wants to grab it from me — and kill me, actually. Kill my business.”

The halal blockade has, inevitably, led to racial accusations and rhetoric being thrown around.

“This is not Palestine!” one vendor shouted, according to Mordowitz.

The kosher vender said, “They’re trying to say that the Jews in Israel are pushing people out, so don’t do it here.”

Mordowitz said one rival even followed managing partner Yosef Salzbank around in a Jeep Cherokee, making sure he parked the cart far enough away.

“I said, ‘Why are you terrorizing me?’ ” Mordowitz recalled.

But the halal hawkers say they’re not the haters.

“He said I am a terrorist. He says I bombed the Twin Towers. That’s racist,” recalled Mossad, who insisted his objections have nothing to do with religion.

“To me, it’s not about him being a Jew.”

This is all like a micro-version of the classic Curb episode “Palestinian Chicken,” in which Larry David gets torn between a delicious Palestinian restaurant and Jewish friends protesting its new location. If only this Midtown argument could also be solved with some hot anti-semitic sex.

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Feb 20, 2015
Jim Benson

Duluth Airport Authority considering food cart at Sky Harbor Airport

By
Nick Minock

February 19, 2015

Updated Feb 19, 2015 at 7:04 PM CST

DULUTH, Minn. (NNCNOW.COM) — The Sky Harbor Airport on Park Point may see a new dining option.

The Duluth Airport Authority is looking at an idea to generate new, sustainable non-aeronautical revenue.

Although plans have not been finalized as of yet, the Duluth Airport Authority is looking at adding a free-standing food cart at the Sky Harbor Airport.

If that plan is successful and a need is shown, the Airport Authority may consider a more permanent structure to host a possible restaurant.

“Again, this is preliminary, nothing has been completed at this point, but we have gotten approached by a couple of local entities that do have an interest in such a thing,” said Natalie Peterson, the Communications and Marketing Director of the Duluth Airport Authority.

If the Duluth Airport Authority decides to go forward, they would start a bidding process and evaluate bids from companies interested in opening a food cart at Sky Harbor Airport.

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Feb 20, 2015
Jim Benson

Brewery brings food-cart debate to downtown Oregon City, where zoning bans …

A brewery’s struggle with the law is at the heart of a debate that over the last week has wheeled in hundreds of signatures on a petition to allow mobile food trucks in downtown Oregon City.

When Oregon City Brewing Company opened a three-barrel brewing facility and taproom last November, part-owner Bryce Morrow envisioned a family-friendly “living room for the community,” and food carts were part of the business plan.

Morrow planned to host mobile food carts on the company’s property to meet the legal requirement that eating must be the predominant activity in areas of a brewery or restaurant where minors are present.

Emails between Morrow and a license investigator with the Oregon Liquor Control Commission show a compromise, prohibiting minors from all areas except outdoor tables and three four-person tables in the tasting room during designated hours. In these areas, the brewing company would limit alcohol sales so drinking did not become the predominant activity.

The company usually hosts one food cart at a time, occasionally two; over the past few months they have worked with dozens of mobile food vendors, Morrow said.

That model worked at first, until the brewing company received its first complaint from Oregon City, where mobile food carts are prohibited in the downtown mixed-use area that includes the brewery at 1401 Washington St.

The city’s code enforcement division sent Morrow a letter, dated Nov. 26, asking him to correct violations to avoid formal enforcement action, and citing code barring mobile food vendors from operating in the area.

Morrow received a second warning, a more formal notice of code violation, on Feb. 11. The city has yet to issue him a fine, Morrow said.

Now, the brewery hosts food carts only on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays — which community development director Tony Konkol confirmed is still against code — and cannot ever allow minors inside. Because food carts are not permanent fixtures, OLCC has revoked the brewing company’s brewery-public house license, and replaced it with a brewery license.

“As a father of two young boys, excluding children has been a blow,” Morrow said.

Morrow has known all along that the city does not allow food carts in the area, and that he could pay a $2,735 fee for the city to consider a code amendment.

“We think it’s great Oregon City Brewing Company came into that facility, but we did have discussions with them early on about our prohibition on food carts,” Konkol said.

Emails between Morrow and city staff dating back to September – two months before the brewery opened – show he understood that food carts were not allowed where he wanted to host them.

“I was just trying to think of what is the best way to enact change,” Morrow said. “I thought, ‘Well, probably getting some kind of violation and getting a lot of constituents behind it,’ so that is the course I am taking.

“I want the city [commission] to take up this issue, not because Oregon City Brewing Company is applying for a code change, but because it is what citizens want.”

What citizens want

More than 650 people so far have signed an online petition Morrow created Saturday, asking Oregon City to remove the ban. Signers have listed diversity, economic impact and community-building as reasons to change the code. Some wrote that not allowing food carts in downtown Oregon City is ridiculous, and labeled the zoning “outdated.”

“It is time for the local city government to enhance business in the city of Oregon City instead of becoming a stumbling block for businesses and their success,” wrote resident Tami Grabinski.

Mobile vending is an affordable entry in to business ownership, allowing people who can’t afford to start a brick-and-mortar restaurant an opportunity, wrote Thomas Batty of Oregon City.

“We need more options for entrepreneurship in our city, not fewer,” Batty wrote.

The Downtown Oregon City Association shared a link to the petition on its Facebook page and asked if food trucks have a place in Oregon City. The association has not taken a position on the issue, said executive director Jonathan Stone.

Some people who commented on the association’s post echoed petition signers, while others wrote arguments against food carts, such as the cost of investing in a non-transient restaurant, an already congested downtown and a general distaste for food carts.

City takes on ‘first big push’ for food carts

Food carts have popped up in discussions over the years, but this is the first big push the city has seen, Konkol said.

He wasn’t sure if an apparent increase in community support for food carts was more related to the situation with Oregon City Brewing Company, or a metro-wide spread of food carts from Portland to other suburbs. It’s probably a little bit of both, Konkol said.

“If you look at food carts as Portlandia, is Oregon City Portlandia?” Stone asked. “I think people are nervous [about what] that represents.”

Because the brewing company is removed from the historic downtown area, it may be a different situation than when a hot dog cart tried to operate near the municipal courthouse more than five years ago, angering local restaurateurs, Oregon City Mayor Dan Holladay said.

A city planning memo from February 2002 states the city’s policy against stand-alone coffee stands was developed to discourage vendor-stand competition with the city’s established, brick-and-mortar eateries. The policy also applies to food carts and has not changed much since then, Konkol said.

People are still split on food carts, as illustrated by social media interactions, Stone said. But the downtown association and city have increasingly brought mobile vendors in for special occasions, such as Saturday markets. Mobile food carts are explicitly permitted in the new Willamette Falls Downtown District, former site of the Blue Heron Paper Mill.

At Oregon City Brewing Company, Morrow plans to keep pushing for carts and hope the city reconsiders its zoning for mobile food vendors.

– Hannah Leone

hleone@oregonian.com

503-294-4001; @HannahMLeone

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Feb 20, 2015
Jim Benson

Olympic Provisions changes name; Portland food cart moves: Restaurant Crawl

The Restaurant Crawl: A (somewhat) regular roundup of (mostly) national restaurant news, links, video and more.

Call me Ishm-ale; Four “white whale” beers — brews that are “awesome,” “scarce,” and that “have a kind of mystique,” including Dave from Portland’s Hair of the Dog Brewing. (Eater)

Olympic Decisions: Olympic Provisions, Portland’s charcuterie giant and one of the city’s best known food brands, has changed its name to ‘Olympia Provisions’ after the company received a cease-and-desist notice from the International Olympic Committee. (The Oregonian)

Flying the coop: Le Pigeon chef Gabriel Rucker’s residency at Food Wine’s Chefs Club gets its first major write-up in the New York press. (NY Post)

Tacos El Fenix: Restaurant Critic Bill Addison tours San Diego and Baja California, finding some world-class food along the way. (Eater)

Carts giveth: ChickPeaDX, the excellent North Portland food cart (and this critic’s pick for the best falafel in Portland), is opening a brick-and-mortar restaurant in Northeast Portland’s The Zipper. (The Oregonian)

Carts taketh away: Meanwhile, Sok Sab Bai, Southeast Portland’s Cambodian restaurant, is closing its nearly two-year-old brick-and-mortar and reopening its old cart. (The Oregonian)

Portland-style: Russia’s secret drinking and dining groups nod to an evolving culinary movement and a restrictive past. (Punch)

Lost in translation: The interplay between Tokyo tradition and Portland protocol comes up again and again at Bamboo Izakaya, a lively, booze-focused restaurant that could use a little more focus in the kitchen. (The Oregonian)

– Michael Russell

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