Browsing articles in "food festivals"
Apr 1, 2014
Tina George

Wind Creek Hospitality announces major initiative focused on supporting and …

Hospitality

Wind Creek Hospitality announces major initiative focused on supporting and promoting regional food

Vicky Karantzavelou – 01 April 2014, 11:29

As part of “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” commitment to local growers and purveyors, Wind Creek Hospitality has also committed to using locally grown and produced food in all of its restaurants whenever possible.

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MONTGOMERY, ALA. – Wind Creek Hospitality (WCH) announced a bold new initiative focused on promoting regional food that includes growers, purveyors, consumers, chefs and restaurateurs, amateur cooks, food banks, and non-profits promoting healthy lifestyles.

“Wind Creek’s Southern Table: Setting a Place for Good Food” is a multi-faceted initiative spearheaded by WCH President Jay Dorris. Designed to expand access to good food for citizens across the region, this effort will promote the culinary industry and its traditions, and support locally grown and produced food.

In making the announcement in Montgomery, WCH’s Vice President of Marketing Michael Perhaes was joined by Edwin Marty, Executive Director of EATSouth, which has an urban farm in downtown Montgomery, and Caroline Rosen, Executive Director of Front Porch Revival, an organization comprised of regional culinary professionals.

Perhaes said, “The good food that is grown all across our region should be available to everyone, and we are making a targeted effort to have what’s grown here and what’s made locally offered on our Wind Creek menus. We also want to make sure that our culinary community is valued and encouraged to grow.”

Wind Creek Hospitality is extremely fortunate to have great partners in these efforts like EATSouth and Front Porch Revival.”

“Wind Creek’s Southern Table” encompasses several strategies. First, it will offer philanthropic support to organizations such as EAT South, which encourages healthy lifestyles through education and sustainable food production. “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” will also support food pantries and other food distribution efforts aimed at helping needy families across the region.

Edwin Marty, EATSouth’s Executive Director noted, “Having a company the size of Wind Creek Hospitality involved in making good food accessible has the potential to make a powerful impact on our State and our region.”

As part of “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” commitment to local growers and purveyors, Wind Creek Hospitality has also committed to using locally grown and produced food in all of its restaurants whenever possible. Already, WCH’s food and beverage operations at its properties, Wind Creek Atmore, Wind Creek Wetumpka and Creek Casino Montgomery, play a major role in supporting local food production.

For example, in the past 6 months, WCH has purchased 243,190 pounds of local chicken, 48,670 pounds of local catfish, 912 Alabama-made cakes and 15,280 pounds of locally made sausage. WCH’s chefs have also committed to regularly featuring more seasonal produce and specialty products such as Belle Chevre cheese made in Elkmont, Alabama.

Additionally, as part of “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” initiative, WCH is continuing to work with smaller producers and local growers on challenges they face with distribution and quantity of available items.  For example, WCH and its produce supplier, Southeastern Fresh Produce, have developed a new system of distribution that provides a way for small Community Supported Agriculture enterprises, like Season in the Sun Farm in Baldwin County, to sell their fresh produce commercially.       

Several efforts to promote culinary excellence are also part of “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” including sponsorship of food festivals such as Gulf Shore’s Annual National Shrimp Festival and amateur cooking events like barbeque cook-offs.

“Wind Creek Hospitality’s commitment is going to make a huge difference to the restaurant industry and the future of food in our region,” said Caroline Rosen. “Not only will ‘Wind Creek’s Southern Table’ support our local farmers, it will also mean that more great chefs will be trained here and have notable careers without leaving home.”

“Wind Creek’s Southern Table” will have a rolling kitchen supporting many of its programs and projects. The 24-foot long food truck, which took 5 1/2 months to outfit, has been dubbed “Good to Go”. It has an industrial kitchen onboard with the capability of producing hundreds of meals at a time. The truck’s traveling culinary ambassador, Chef Paul Norton, has promised that the truck will not only serve good food, it will also serve as a rolling repository of information about good food in the region – where to get it and how to make it.

“I want to have ‘Good to Go’ be a place where people can talk about, learn about, and enjoy great food,” said Chef Paul. “This is a chance for WCH to really support the growers and food producers in our region and share great meals with our neighbors. It will truly be a moveable feast.”

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Mar 31, 2014
Tina George

Over 600 come through for ‘A Taste of Swaziland’

Over 600 people attended the first of the Rotary Club of Malkerns’ many food festivals to come.

Held on Saturday at House on Fire, the event dubbed, ‘A Taste of Swaziland’ featured 14 food stalls showcasing a variety of local delicacies.

The audience tasted indigenous to modern food during the event aimed at raising funds to finance the rotary’s mentorship programme ‘Hawane Project’ for disadvantaged adolescents and children with HIV/AIDS.

Some of the delicacies included impala curry from Big Game Park, ematfumbu from Mantenga Cultural Village, sushi from Luxy Gardens, roasted goat from Malkerns Valley Rotary Club, different kinds of bread from Ngwane Mills, Shisa Nyama from Mantenga Lodge, wine tasting by Lucky Howe, Simonsberg cheese tasting from Parmalat, amongst others.

People had a variety to choose from. Interestingly, most of the chefs were guys on the day.

Rotary Club of Malkerns PRO Khetho Dlamini said the attendance surpassed their expectations as they had expected only 300 people since it was their first festival.

He added that the feedback they got from the attendees was positive.

“We will host a same event even next year around the same time and it will be bigger than this one. 

“The money collected here will be used positively for our project in Hawane ,” he said.

 On the day, Mantenga Lodge was awarded a prize for the best dish while the best décor prize went to Luxy Gardens. 

The Best Marketing Strategy Award went to Thunderbolt and all the other participants recieved certificates.

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Mar 30, 2014
Tina George

Taste of India

Tarun Kumar Basu, President of Indian Cultural Centre, inaugurates the festival by lighting the traditional lamp along with senior chefs and management of Sharq Village and Spa.

From the fragrant infusions of the north to the

exciting and punchy flavours of the south, the Indian

food festival at Sharq Village and Spa encompasses

regional diversity. By Umer Nangiana

For all the foodies who love Indian cuisine, here is the good news. Sharq Village and Spa has brought in exotic flavours and all-authentic Indian delicacies to Doha. But hurry, the festival lasts only till tomorrow.

“Take a cook’s tour around the regions of India to discover the vast range of this ancient cuisine. From the fragrant infusions of the north to the exciting and punchy flavours of the south, the five-day event will have everything,” said a statement by Sharq Village and Spa.

Indian food encompasses a wide variety of regional cuisines which lead to diversity of flavours. This gastronomic occasion is hosted by resident Chef Janardan Das and his team. At the event, he has put up a spread laden with traditional dishes ranging from curries and naans to grilled specialties from the tandoori oven and desserts.

There are more than 20 types of appetisers from different parts of India. Achari shrimps salad, kutchumber salad, curried pasta salad, dahi vada, pani puri and papdi chat are some of the popular picks. “Some of the dishes are really authentic. Fortunately, the chef is from the same town of mine. They have dishes from almost all the provinces of India here,” Tarun Kumar Basu, President of Indian Cultural Centre (ICC), told Community.

Basu inaugurated the food festival being held in the beautiful setting of Sharq Village. At dinner, as Basu moved to the desserts table, the chef recommended him gajjar ka halwa (a sweet dish made of carrots). “He was suggesting gajjar ka halwa. He said it was the best, so it must be good because the chef was recommending,” speculated Basu.

Some of the notable Indian dishes were vegetable biryani, aloo dum Kashmiri, dal makhani, badshahi biryani, mutton roganjosh, prawn malai curry, chicken tikka makhani, kakori kebab, murg malai kebab, lassoni kebab and jhinga kebab. In the dessert section, there were gulab jamun, chum chum, jallebi, jaggery ice cream and kulfi with falooda.

 “We express our sincere thanks to the management of Sharq Village Spa for arranging this wonderful Indian food festival,” said Basu. “We have noticed that in recent years most of the star hotels in Qatar are conducting such Indian food festivals and it has become very popular.”

From the feedback he received, Basu said Sharq Village, which is part of Ritz Carlton Group, was hosting the festival again after a successful exhibition of Indian food at the parent hotel. “We are very happy to know that all the major hotels are coming up with the idea of Indian cuisine.”

Besides Indian food, Basu said he personally enjoys kebabs the most. It is, he added, the best food for both as a late night snack and dinner.

The Sharq food festival is available for dinner from 6.30pm to 11pm and is priced QR250 per person inclusive of soft beverages while QR125 for children aged six to 12 years.

With restaurants and food and beverage options recognised as amongst the best in the region, Sharq Village and Spa offers unique dining experiences as each venue blends the rich ambience of the ancient Qatari village with five-star service and comfort.

The village restaurants offer al fresco seating at ample beachfront and rooftop terraces. Dining options include all day dining restaurant Al Liwan, modern seafood restaurant, Al Dana, Arabian-styled cafe Al Jalsa, rooftop shisha terrace Al Wanis, a cigar lounge, lobby lounge and Al Seef the outdoor pool and snack bar.

 

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Mar 29, 2014
Tina George

Florida’s Capital City Serves up 3rd Annual Restaurant Week 7 Concert Series

A mixture of eateries and nightlife for nearly every taste.

Florida’s Capital City Serves up 3rd Annual Restaurant Week 7 Concert Series

Author- News on the Net  Friday, March 28, 2014
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Tallahassee, Fla. – Celebrating the diverse selection of dining options and the city’s growing reputation as a culinary destination, Visit Tallahassee presents the 3rd Annual Capital Cuisine Restaurant Week and Concert Series, May 15 – 27, 2014.

Patrons dine their way through the Capital City, exploring the food, music and entertainment showcased in five different districts – Gaines Street, Midtown, Market District, College Town and Downtown. Regardless of location, farm-to-table offerings, eclectic food trucks, contemporary bars and annual food festivals, give the city a mixture of eateries and nightlife for nearly every taste.

Location influences food today as it did thousands of years ago. Fertile soil and a mild climate contribute to Tallahassee’s readily available, locally grown ingredients, and with the Gulf of Mexico only 25 miles away, fresh seafood finds its way onto menus everywhere.

For more information on Capital Cuisine Restaurant Week Concert Series, a complete list of participating restaurants and free concerts, visit www.VisitTallahassee.com/CapitalCuisine or call Visit Tallahassee toll free at (800) 628-2866.

“Tallahassee’s dining options are unlike anything in our region,” said Lee Daniel, Visit Tallahassee’s executive director. “Tallahassee offers a diverse menu of authentic regional cuisine, fine dining and international fare that has quickly attracted the attention and awards from leading food critics.”

Participating restaurants offer specially selected menus for lunch and dinner, featuring two to three course meals priced at $15 or $30 respectively. Many restaurants and other venues also offer live entertainment.

Visitors are encouraged to share dining and concert experiences by using the hashtag #IHeartTally on Twitter Facebook, Instagram and Vine.

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Mar 29, 2014
Tina George

Wind Creek Hospitality Announces Major Initiative Focused on Supporting and … – SYS

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MONTGOMERY, Ala., March 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ – Wind Creek Hospitality (WCH), one of the largest hospitality companies in Alabama, today announced a bold new initiative focused on promoting regional food that includes growers, purveyors, consumers, chefs and restaurateurs, amateur cooks, food banks, and non-profits promoting healthy lifestyles. 

“Wind Creek’s Southern Table: Setting a Place for Good Food” is a multi-faceted initiative spearheaded by WCH President Jay Dorris.  Designed to expand access to good food for citizens across the region, this effort will promote the culinary industry and its traditions, and support locally grown and produced food.

In making today’s announcement in Montgomery, WCH’s Vice President of Marketing Michael Perhaes was joined by Edwin Marty, Executive Director of EATSouth, which has an urban farm in downtown Montgomery, and Caroline Rosen, Executive Director of Front Porch Revival, an organization comprised of regional culinary professionals.

Perhaes said, “The good food that is grown all across our region should be available to everyone, and we are making a targeted effort to have what’s grown here and what’s made locally offered on our Wind Creek menus. We also want to make sure that our culinary community is valued and encouraged to grow.” 

Wind Creek Hospitality is extremely fortunate to have great partners in these efforts like EATSouth and Front Porch Revival.”

“Wind Creek’s Southern Table” encompasses several strategies.  First, it will offer philanthropic support to organizations such as EAT South, which encourages healthy lifestyles through education and sustainable food production. “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” will also support food pantries and other food distribution efforts aimed at helping needy families across the region. 

Edwin Marty, EATSouth’s Executive Director noted, “Having a company the size of Wind Creek Hospitality involved in making good food accessible has the potential to make a powerful impact on our State and our region.”

As part of “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” commitment to local growers and purveyors, Wind Creek Hospitality has also committed to using locally grown and produced food in all of its restaurants whenever possible. Already, WCH’s food and beverage operations at its properties, Wind Creek Atmore, Wind Creek Wetumpka and Creek Casino Montgomery, play a major role in supporting local food production.

For example, in the past 6 months, WCH has purchased 243,190 pounds of local chicken, 48,670 pounds of local catfish, 912 Alabama-made cakes and 15,280 pounds of locally made sausage. WCH’s chefs have also committed to regularly featuring more seasonal produce and specialty products such as Belle Chevre cheese made in Elkmont, Alabama. 

Additionally, as part of “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” initiative, WCH is continuing to work with smaller producers and local growers on challenges they face with distribution and quantity of available items.  For example, WCH and its produce supplier, Southeastern Fresh Produce, have developed a new system of distribution that provides a way for small Community Supported Agriculture enterprises, like Season in the Sun Farm in Baldwin County, to sell their fresh produce commercially.       

Several efforts to promote culinary excellence are also part of “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” including sponsorship of food festivals such as Gulf Shore’s Annual National Shrimp Festival and amateur cooking events like barbeque cook-offs. 

“Wind Creek Hospitality’s commitment is going to make a huge difference to the restaurant industry and the future of food in our region,” said Caroline Rosen. “Not only will ‘Wind Creek’s Southern Table’ support our local farmers, it will also mean that more great chefs will be trained here and have notable careers without leaving home.”

“Wind Creek’s Southern Table” will have a rolling kitchen supporting many of its programs and projects.  The 24-foot long food truck, which took 5 1/2 months to outfit, has been dubbed “Good to Go”. It has an industrial kitchen onboard with the capability of producing hundreds of meals at a time.  The truck’s traveling culinary ambassador, Chef Paul Norton, has promised that the truck will not only serve good food, it will also serve as a rolling repository of information about good food in the region – where to get it and how to make it.

“I want to have ‘Good to Go’ be a place where people can talk about, learn about, and enjoy great food,” said Chef Paul.  “This is a chance for WCH to really support the growers and food producers in our region and share great meals with our neighbors.  It will truly be a moveable feast.”

Follow Wind Creek Hospitality on Facebook.com/windcreekhospitality and Twitter @wchospitality

Follow “Good to Go” on Facebook/tastewindcreek and Twitter @tastewindcreek  #goodtogo

About Wind Creek Hospitality
Wind Creek Hospitality operates casinos, hotels, racetracks, poker rooms, and entertainment facilities in Alabama and Florida including the 236-room resort Wind Creek Casino Hotel Atmore, the 283-room resort Wind Creek Casino Hotel Wetumpka, Creek Casino Montgomery and Mobile Greyhound Park in Alabama. In Florida, WCH operates the Pensacola Greyhound Track Poker Room and Creek Entertainment Gretna. Wind Creek Hospitality is an authority of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians. 

The Poarch Creek Indians are descendants of a segment of the original Creek Nation, which once covered almost all of Alabama and Georgia. Unlike many eastern Indian tribes, the Poarch Creeks were not removed from their tribal lands and have lived together for almost 200 years in and around the reservation in Poarch, Alabama.

The reservation is located eight miles northwest of Atmore, Alabama, in rural Escambia County, and 57 miles east of Mobile.  The Poarch Creek Indians is the only federally recognized Indian Tribe in the state of Alabama, operating as a sovereign nation with its own system of government and bylaws. The Tribe operates a variety of economic enterprises, employing thousands of area residents.

SOURCE Wind Creek Hospitality

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Mar 29, 2014
Tina George

Two Eat Street food festivals on the way

Hopes that events will increase trade

By Jessica Bave, Reporter

Two Eat Street food festivals on the way

THE historic heart of Basingstoke is set to host the first of two Eat Street food festivals in the town centre.

London Street is hosting the event, organised and funded by Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council and Destination Basingstoke, on April 12 from 11am to 3pm, ahead of the food fair a week later in Festival Place.

Basingstoke’s restaurants will open their doors to showcase international cuisine and demonstrate the tricks of their trade.

Accompanied by live music and The Candy Floss Queens, there will also be the chance to decorate cupcakes, make Easter eggs, follow a children’s Easter trail and taste food all for free.

The activities, which are supported and provided by local businesses, hope to draw attention to what is on offer in the area and increase footfall across the town.

Councillor Ranil Jayawardena, deputy leader of the borough council, said: “This will be a great event for local businesses and families looking for something to do on the first weekend of the Easter school holidays – making the Top of The Town a place to come to, not walk through.

“We’re taking the action needed to turn ‘old Basingstoke’ into a more interesting and vibrant destination for residents and visitors today and tomorrow.”

Destination Basingstoke’s managing director Felicity Edwards added: “This is the first time anything like this has happened, and we hope it will encourage more co-operation between local businesses and a better understanding of what they each have to offer.”

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Mar 28, 2014
Tina George

Cincinnati’s goetta dogs

What is goetta? A sausage widely celebrated in Cincinnati that can be eaten for breakfast, on a sandwich, on a pizza… and especially as a hotdog.

By

Sue LauA Palatable Pastime /
March 27, 2014

Top your goetta dog with mustard and sauerkraut.

A Palatable Pastime



Enlarge

In the Queen City of Ohio, Cincinnati, we love our wursts and we take it to an art form.

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Sue Lau


A Palatable Pastime

Sue Lau is a food blogger, cooking enthusiast, cookbook collector, writer, and independent bookseller. She lives with her husband and two cats near Dayton, Ohio. Originally from St. Louis, Missouri, her love of food has followed her through the Southern USA and eventually to Ohio. She enjoys cooking and creating all types of cuisine and sharing that knowledge with others. It is her favorite pastime.

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Bratwurst, mettwursts, bockwurst, knockwurst, Italian sausage, Portuguese sausage, Kielbasa and other smoked sausages make up the greater part of those “art supplies,” but perhaps none so distinctive of us here in southwest Ohio than Goetta, a name that simultaneously frightens the uninformed and whets the taste buds of the experienced.

Have you eaten goetta? First it helps to know how to say the word so that when you ask your butcher for some, you won’t get “a look.” Here in Ohio, we call it “get-uh”, as in “get a load of this,” “get a life,” and of course, as in this post, “get a dog.”

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The major manufacturer of commercially prepared goetta in Ohio is Gliers, who sell their product in one pound bulk packages in the meat section of the market, near the bacon and breakfast sausage. If you are lucky, you might find goetta dogs packaged there as well, with the mixture inside of casings, as hot dogs are.

To be sure, even though it is sold near the breakfast sausage, this item isn’t really intended for breakfast. Of course, you can have it that way if you like, commonly sliced into thick coins and fried. And even though the heritage of the area is predominately German, Germans actually have “no idea” what goetta is, as it is a creation of southwest Ohio among other things (like Cincinnati chili).

We can eat goetta on the plate, in a goetta dog, made into “cheesesteaks,” on pizza, the list goes on from here into eccentrically delicious territory.

Annually, there is a goetta fest down on the levee in Newport (the Kentucky side of downtown Cincinnati). We in Ohio, southeast Indiana and Northern Kentucky wrack our brains trying to figure out new ways to celebrate food. Beginning in late summer, you will see towns dot the maps with a whole spectrum of different food festivals, because we love a good reason to get out in the fresh air, have a bite to eat, and something to look at and listen to, such as fine art and live music. And the goetta fest is one of many ways we do just that.

Of course, if you live in southwest Ohio, you probably already know all that. And have eaten goetta, and can buy it at the local Kroger market. But if you don’t, and find yourself in a food desert devoid of all things Cincinnati, you can find recipes on the internet for making goetta yourself. Traditionally, goetta has been made since the 1880′s as a mixture of steel-cut pinhead oats, beef, pork, onions and seasonings. It tastes like sausage with a bit of grain in it, but the grain is very mild tasting. It is quite savory and has a softer texture that bulk pork sausage, although it can be a bit firmer if it is casings.

I don’t put the goetta in casings to make the goetta dogs. They are shaped, and if you can brown them with a gentle touch, all they will lack from the goetta dogs in the casings is that pop when you bite them, but some people don’t like casings anyway. The taste in the end is still just the same.

I do hope you aren’t too timid to try these. They are quite a bit like brats with kraut if you like those. They make a great snack or sandwich for a casual meal or for die-hard football fans (Go Bengals!)

Goetta dogs
Serves 4

1 pound prepared goetta (such as Glier’s brand)

1/4 cup German mustard or Dussledorf mustard

1/2-3/4 cup hot drained sauerkraut

2-3 tablespoons oil

1. Cut open roll of goetta and slice into four pieces lengthwise.

2. Use your hands to roll into a smooth cyclinder

3. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet, and brown goetta dogs on all sides, turning very carefully to avoid breakage, and keeping them separated so they don’t try to stick to each other.

4. Serve on hot dog buns with mustard and sauerkraut.

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The Christian Science Monitor has assembled a diverse group of food bloggers. Our guest bloggers are not employed or directed by The Monitor and the views expressed are the bloggers’ own and they are responsible for the content of their blogs and their recipes. All readers are free to make ingredient substitutions to satisfy their dietary preferences, including not using wine (or substituting cooking wine) when a recipe calls for it. To contact us about a blogger, click here.

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Mar 28, 2014
Tina George

Localism, local food celebrated at Tucson food festival

Pastiche Fried Avocado

Pastiche Fried Avocado



Posted: Thursday, March 27, 2014 11:52 am

Localism, local food celebrated at Tucson food festival

By Matt Russell, For Inside Tucson Business

Inside Tucson Business

The seed was planted about three years ago, when Manish Shah and Pat Connors discussed a shared vision for a free and family-oriented event that celebrated Southern Arizona’s vibrant local food community.

On April 6, the fruits of their labors will be ripe for harvest at the first Viva La Local Food Festival at Rillito Downs Park, 4502 N. First Ave.

Eighty local farmers’ market vendors, 30 local restaurants and 10 local breweries and wineries will come together under the same spirit that guided Shah and Connors, along with live music performed by five local bands.

“This is something that I don’t think Tucson has ever seen before,” said Shah, founder of Maya Tea Company and executive director of Heirloom Farmers Markets. “Some food festivals of this magnitude tend to price certain parts of the community out of the experience, and we wanted to make this event approachable and affordable for the entire community.”

For Connors, getting behind this event was a natural given his long-time loyalty to all things local at Pastiche Modern Eatery, 3025 N. Campbell Ave.

“This event is all about community, and it’s really our way of giving back to the local community that has supported us for so long,” he said.

Connors will serve four dishes at the event, including his panko-crusted fried avocados with a chipotle pepper aioli, and pork chili tacos with locally grown chilies from Native Seeds/SEARCH.

Though nearly 3,000 miles separate Tucson and Maui, nobody can question Sam Alboy’s fierce faithfulness to local at Mama’s Hawaiian Bar-B-Cue, with three Southern Arizona locations. Alboy, general manager of Mama’s, was recently elected president of the Tucson Originals, a network of independent and locally owned restaurants.

“To me, the idea of supporting local goes beyond local sources of food,” said Alboy. “It’s about getting behind local businesses and local artists who are all making a great local impact.”

Alboy’s pulled pork sandwich, which is made from pork shoulder that has been slow roasted for 18-22 hours, should be a hit at the event given that Mama’s currently sells 800 pounds of pork every day. Alboy suggests kicking this sandwich up with Mama’s own smoky mesquite barbecue sauce.

When it comes to washing it all down, event attendees can expect to be libated locally as well.

Ten Fifty Five Brewing, 3810 E. 44th St., is rolling out three varieties of locally brewed suds, including a coffee stout made with java from Tucson’s Exo Roast Co., and a saison-style brew made with South Indian black tea from Maya Tea and locally harvested Meyer lemons.

“This saison brings together many different flavors,” said John Paul Vyborny, head brewer at Ten Fifty Five Brewing. “You’ll surely pick up some clove and banana, along with those classic black tea notes that we think work well with the Meyer lemon zest.”

Vyborny tells me that he works very hard to be local in his brewing, which is perhaps the biggest thing to which he’s looking forward on April 6.

“We’ll be conducting research at the event to find the next great local ingredient that we can use for a future beer.”

The event is from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and admission is free, though parking is $5. Restaurants are charging $5 per dish, and beer and wine will be available for $5 to $10 per glass. Additional information can be found at www.VivaLaLocalFoodFest.com.

And, yes, I said fried avocados. Viva La Local!

Contact Matt Russell, whose day job is CEO of Russell Public Communications, at mrussell@russellpublic.com. Russell is also the host of “On the Menu Live” that airs 4-5 p.m. Saturdays on KNST 790-AM, as well as the host of the Friday Weekend Watch segment on the “Buckmaster Show” on KVOI 1030- AM.


on

Thursday, March 27, 2014 11:52 am.

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