Browsing articles in "food festivals"
Jun 23, 2014
Tina George

International food festivals 2014-2015

‘; var fr = document.getElementById(adID); setHash(fr, hash); fr.body = body; var doc = getFrameDocument(fr); doc.open(); doc.write(body); setTimeout(function() {closeDoc(getFrameDocument(document.getElementById(adID)))}, 2000); } function renderJIFAdWithInterim(holderID, adID, srcUrl, width, height, hash, bodyAttributes) { setHash(document.getElementById(holderID), hash); document.dcdAdsR.push(adID); document.write(”); } function renderIJAd(holderID, adID, srcUrl, hash) { document.dcdAdsAA.push(holderID); setHash(document.getElementById(holderID), hash); document.write(” + ‘ript’); } function renderJAd(holderID, adID, srcUrl, hash) { document.dcdAdsAA.push(holderID); setHash(document.getElementById(holderID), hash); document.dcdAdsH.push(holderID); document.dcdAdsI.push(adID); document.dcdAdsU.push(srcUrl); } function er_showAd() { var regex = new RegExp(“externalReferrer=(.*?)(; |$)”, “gi”); var value = regex.exec(document.cookie); if (value value.length == 3) { var externalReferrer = value[1]; return (!FD.isInternalReferrer() || ((externalReferrer) (externalReferrer 0))); } return false; } function isHome() { var loc = “” + window.location; loc = loc.replace(“//”, “”); var tokens = loc.split(“/”); if (tokens.length == 1) { return true; } else if (tokens.length == 2) { if (tokens[1].trim().length == 0) { return true; } } return false; } function checkAds(checkStrings) { var cs = checkStrings.split(‘,’); for (var i = 0; i 0 cAd.innerHTML.indexOf(c) 0) { document.dcdAdsAI.push(cAd.hash); cAd.style.display =’none’; } } } if (!ie) { for (var i = 0; i 0 doc.body.innerHTML.indexOf(c) 0) { document.dcdAdsAI.push(fr.hash); fr.style.display =’none’; } } } } } if (document.dcdAdsAI.length 0 || document.dcdAdsAG.length 0) { var pingServerParams = “i=”; var sep = “”; for (var i=0;i 0) { var pingServerUrl = “/action/pingServerAction?” + document.pingServerAdParams; var xmlHttp = null; try { xmlHttp = new XMLHttpRequest(); } catch(e) { try { xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject(“Microsoft.XMLHttp”); } catch(e) { xmlHttp = null; } } if (xmlHttp != null) { xmlHttp.open( “GET”, pingServerUrl, true); xmlHttp.send( null ); } } } function initAds(log) { for (var i=0;i 0) { doc.removeChild(doc.childNodes[0]); } doc.open(); var newBody = fr.body; if (getCurrentOrd(newBody) != “” ) { newBody = newBody.replace(“;ord=”+getCurrentOrd(newBody), “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } else { newBody = newBody.replace(“;ord=”, “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } doc.write(newBody); document.dcdsAdsToClose.push(fr.id); } } else { var newSrc = fr.src; if (getCurrentOrd(newSrc) != “” ) { newSrc = newSrc.replace(“;ord=”+getCurrentOrd(newSrc), “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } else { newSrc = newSrc.replace(“;ord=”, “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } fr.src = newSrc; } } } if (document.dcdsAdsToClose.length 0) { setTimeout(function() {closeOpenDocuments(document.dcdsAdsToClose)}, 500); } } }; var ie = isIE(); if(ie typeof String.prototype.trim !== ‘function’) { String.prototype.trim = function() { return this.replace(/^s+|s+$/g, ”); }; } document.dcdAdsH = new Array(); document.dcdAdsI = new Array(); document.dcdAdsU = new Array(); document.dcdAdsR = new Array(); document.dcdAdsEH = new Array(); document.dcdAdsE = new Array(); document.dcdAdsEC = new Array(); document.dcdAdsAA = new Array(); document.dcdAdsAI = new Array(); document.dcdAdsAG = new Array(); document.dcdAdsToClose = new Array(); document.igCount = 0; document.tCount = 0; var dcOrd = Math.floor(100000000*Math.random()); document.dcAdsCParams = “”; var savValue = getAdCookie(“sav”); if (savValue != null savValue.length 2) { document.dcAdsCParams = savValue + “;”; } document.dcAdsCParams += “csub={csub};”; var aamCookie=function(e,t){var i=document.cookie,n=”";return i.indexOf(e)-1(n=”u=”+i.split(e+”=”)[1].split(“;”)[0]+”;”),i.indexOf(t)-1(n=n+decodeURIComponent(i.split(t+”=”)[1].split(“;”)[0])+”;”),n}(“aam_did”,”aam_dest_dfp_legacy”);

August 15-17, 2014
sfstreetfoodfest.com

“It’s a street party, but on a massive scale,” says festival committee member Michelle Fernandez.

Rene Redzepi will co-curate MAD Copenhagen this year.

Rene Redzepi will co-curate MAD Copenhagen this year. Photo: Erik Refner

“Don’t expect too much polished cutlery, there is a real hippie vibe, all the vendors started by cooking street food and, as street food should be eaten on the street, that’s where the party starts,” she says.

Organised by La Cocina, a local non-profit that supports aspiring food entrepreneurs, the roving event is a three-day affair: a ticketed Friday night market; an all-day Saturday street festival with 80 vendors, (entry is free, though dishes are not); and a Sunday food and entrepreneurship conference.

Authenticity rating: The real appeal of this festival is its social conscience. Its mission goes beyond just delivering great food; it’s a celebration of entrepreneurship and emerging local producers and restaurants.

Don’t miss: This year, Saturday vendors have been set a new challenge: their menu must offer a to-be-determined item that’s a unifying dish across all cuisines, culminating in a “Top Chef”-style cook-off.

Mistura

Lima, Peru
September 5-14, 2014
mistura.pe

The frog smoothie – freshly killed, skinned, poached and blended with a range of Amazonian health supplements – is not likely to appear on a Jane Strode menu any time soon, but for the Sydney-based chef it was a seminal moment of her Mistura 2013 visit.

“Food festivals should be about experiencing the new and trying different flavours; it can’t help but broaden your palette,” Strode says.

Last year’s Mistura attracted more than 500,000 people, making it Latin America’s largest food festival. Producers and restaurants are grouped into “worlds”, showcasing Peruvian specialties such as chocolate, quinoa and bread.

Don’t miss: El Gran Mercado, or the Big Market, was Strode’s favourite “world”. It is bursting with fresh produce and passionate producers showcasing their unique products.

Exotic Must-Try: Cushuro are tiny spheres of cyanobacteria that grow at altitudes above 3600m in small lagoons, pools and wetlands. Used deftly at Malabar, Central and Astrid Y Gaston – Peru’s hottest restaurants – they add a unique texture and appearance with a flavour reminiscent of a subtle balsamic.

Kaikoura Seafest

Kaikoura, South Island, New Zealand
October 4, 2014
seafest.co.nz

Of the hundreds of food festivals that Professor Wynn-Moylan studies and visits every year, Kaikoura Seafest stands out as a shining example of “keeping it real”.

“In terms of gastronomic tourism, all regions are not created equal; some have an abundance of resources and comparative advantages – Kaikoura is one of them,” he says.

What Kaikoura – a tiny town on the east coast of New Zealand’s South Island – has is a huge variety of marine life, thanks to a cold, nutrient-rich, deep-water trench just off its shoreline.

Unsurprisingly, the stars of the town’s annual event all come from local waters – crayfish, paua and mussels – served up with a commonsense, no-frills approach.

“It is not the most glamorous of festivals, but the quality of the produce is remarkable.

“If authentic, regional cuisine is what you want from a culinary vacation, then Kaikoura is a good choice.”

Must eat: Whole crayfish steamed in salt water, then split and baked with Hapuku olive oil, riesling and herbs.

Terra Madre

Turin, Italy
October 23-27, 2014
salonedelgusto.com

Salone del Gusto and Terra Madre – the slow food movement’s biannual festival in Turin – is a culinary United Nations that mixes food politics with gastronomic pleasure.

More than 1000 farmers, chefs and food artisans from more than 100 countries showcase traditional foods and production methods, united in their fight against “McFood”.

Former member of the Slow Food Sydney committee Justine Topfer says despite its size – roughly 15 football fields – the festival has “a great, convivial feeling of shared ideals and friendship”.

“The diversity of visitors and foods is staggering, I met Basque shepherds, Indian rice growers and Maine potato farmers. I tasted cheese, wine, meat, honey, chocolate and herbs from all over the globe and came back bursting with new ideas,” she says.

“Fundamentally the event proved to me that good, clean, fair food, is not an elitist preoccupation, it concerns everyone.”

Save a Food: From Afghanistan’s Abjosh raisin to Venezuela’s Barlovento cacao there are more than 1500 foods on Slow Food’s “Arc of Taste” list of endangered foods. Festival organisers want visitors to taste – and champion – foods near extinction, in the hope that increased visibility will lead to greater economic viability.

Ballymaloe Literary Festival of Food and Wine

May 15 to 17, 2015
litfest.ie

“There are already plenty of festivals focused on celebrity chefs and restaurants,” says Darina Allen, arguably Ireland’s most famous cook and founder of the Ballymaloe Literary Festival of Food and Wine.

“I wanted to create an event that celebrated the art of food writing.”

Enticing the food and wine literati is not the festival’s only point of difference, it’s also set in the bucolic Ballymaloe estate (home to the famed country-house restaurant and cooking school), allowing for forays into extensive country gardens and live demonstrations in a well-equipped kitchen, as opposed to the makeshift facilities of exhibition halls.

Don’t miss: The Big Shed, located next door to the festival, is home to a free, fringe program of music, food and wine events. It’s also the venue for the festival after-party, dubbed “foodie Glastonbury” by The Guardian newspaper.

MAD Copenhagen

Copenhagen, Denmark
Late August 2015, check website
madfood.co

Tickets are sold out for this year’s event, because MAD Copenhagen is arguably the hottest ticket on the culinary calendar. Unashamedly “by chefs, for chefs” tickets have been limited to 600 since its inception in 2010. Those lucky enough to snare entry to the two-day event will be granted an audience with the food world’s most influential opinion leaders.

Seminar sessions have moved away from demonstrations. For the first time in 2013 there was no kitchen on the podium. Instead, interactive panel discussions encouraged robust brainstorming.

Festival food is far from standard conference repast. Cutting-edge chefs from around the globe serve a sit-down, long lunch feast. Neither the 2014 or 2015 guest caterers have been announced, but last year Souk el Tayeb (20 women from Beirut’s farmers market) and Mission Chinese NYC and San Francisco did not disappoint.

Star Wattage: Time magazine’s cover boys, the “Gods of Food”, Alex Atala, of D.O.M, Sao Paulo, Rene Redzepi, of Noma, Copenhagen and David Chang, of Momofuku, New York, co-curate this year’s event.

Be organised: Monitor the website for the ticket sale dates for 2015 and then organise your 14-year-old IT-whizkid-nephew to secure your purchase.

Comments

Be the first to comment.

Would you like to comment?

You will need Javascript enabled to use our Commenting Feature.

Make a comment

You are logged in as Logout]

All information entered below may be published.

Error: Please enter your screen name.

Error: Your Screen Name must be less than 255 characters.


Error: Your Location must be less than 255 characters.


Error: Please enter your comment.

Error: Your Message must be less than 300 words.





Thank you

Your comment has been submitted for approval.

Comments are moderated and are generally published if they are on-topic and not abusive.


Latest top 10

View More

Promotions

Oysters with finger limes

Chin Chin

Take a peek into the high-end world of haute cuisine food-and-wine matching.

Most popular recipes

In The News Today


Taste try

Good Food gift cards


The Good Food Gift Card.

Give the gift of Good Food with a restaurant gift card

    Food for Good


    Food for good logo

    The organisations and people using food as a tool for change

      Events


      Ferran Adria.

      Good Food Month grows around the country

        Competition


        George Calombaris.

        The mystery box challenge

          Newsletters


          Good Food on a smart phone.

          Sign-up to receive news, recipes and reviews












            Recommended Reading

            Jun 22, 2014
            Tina George

            Ultimate Summer Guide: Food festivals

            The Jazz Age Party on Governors Island features period music, dance and costumes.Whitney Browne The Jazz Age Party on Governors Island features period music, dance and costumes.

             

            Dive fork-first into a melting pot of food festivals this summer that you won’t want to fast on.

            Sip Gatsby-era cocktails while you time-travel back to the Roaring Twenties at the Jazz Age Lawn Party, have a summer catch of Holland herring at the Grand Central Oyster Bar or nosh baconwrapped jumbo pretzels at Smorgasburg.

            All That Jazz

            The Smorgasburg brings bacon-wrapped pretzels to Williamsburg.Kate Glicksberg The Smorgasburg brings bacon-wrapped pretzels to Williamsburg.

            Dust off your finest flapper frocks and brush up on your Hemingway for the Jazz Age Lawn Party. Governor’s Island will be transformed into a Prohibition-era picnic. Gatsby-era enthusiasts can groove to the sounds of Michael Arenella His Dreamland Orchestra while sipping Golden Age St. Germain cocktails designed by Clover Club’s Julie Reiner and Lynnette Marrero. Aug. 16 17th, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. $35 on site, $30 in advance. Governor’s Island. Catch the Manhattan Ferry at 10 South St. by the Staten Island Ferry, or the Brooklyn Ferry at Pier 6 near Atlantic Ave. Jazzagelawnparty.com/tickets.html.

            A Smorgasburg of Food

            Have your cake and eat an artisanal ice cream sandwich too. The epic summer street fair is back with new vendors including Dun-Well’s vegan donuts, Home Friete’s Belgian fresh-cut fries with sassy sauces like chipotle ranch and lemon garlic aioli, as well as Bronx Baking Co.’s extra-large soft pretzels wrapped in bacon and mozzarella. Get ’em while they’re hot! Every Saturday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. in Fort Greene (176 Lafayette Ave.) and every Sunday from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. in Williamsburg (50 Kent Ave.). See smorgasburg.com for other locations and vendors.

            Celebrate French culture at New York's annual three-block fête, Bastille Day on 60th Street.Matthieu Raffard Celebrate French culture at New York’s annual three-block fête, “Bastille Day on 60th Street.”

            A Oui Bit of Fun

            The Bastille Day celebration returns on July 13 with decadent French crepes, eclairs and fromages. Sip the finest French wine and beer toasting to France’s independence, presented by the French Institute Alliance Francaise. Noon-5 p.m. 60th St., between Lexington Fifth Aves. See bastilledayny.com.

            Fresh Catch

            Herring from Holland prepared in the traditional Dutch manner. The Herrring Festival is held at the Oyster Bar in Grand Central Station.Timothy Fadek/Polaris Images Herring from Holland prepared in the traditional Dutch manner. The Herrring Festival is held at the Oyster Bar in Grand Central Station.

            Here’s a food fest that will hook, line and sink your taste buds. The Grand Central Oyster Bar hosts the 34th annual Holland Herring Festival, boasting a first taste of the Nieuwe Matjes herring from the Netherlands. Beginning at noon every day through July 5. Grand Central Terminal, 89 E. 42nd St. See oysterbarny.com.

            Jump for Jubilee

            The Brighton Jubilee Festival is back on Aug. 24 to celebrate diversity and delicious food. Join more than 125,000 people as you eat your way through the borough’s best street vendors — with plenty of the nabe’s Russian flavor, of coruse. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Brighton Beach Ave. Brooklyn. See brightonbeach.com/jubilee-festival.html.

            Exported.;Tanya Braganti for New York Daily News Shoppers look at a stand with Russian dolls at the Brighton Beach Jubilee.

            Life’s a Beach

            Now you can finally get a taste of Brooklyn on Long Island with the new SmorgasBar (and beer garden) at Jones Beach. The outpost boasts five food vendors, such as Handsome Hank’s Fish Hut and El Gato Nacho, who will serve up summer’s edible essentials like oysters, iced coffee and slushies that can be washed down with craft beer from L.I. breweries like Greenport Harbor and Southampton Publick House. Daily, 11 a.m.-8 p.m. through Labor Day. 1000 Ocean Pkwy., Wantagh . See brooklynflea.com.

            New Nordic Meets Copenhagen Street Food

            The city's street fairs bring a smorgasbord of food. The city’s street fairs bring a smorgasbord of food.

            The Copenhagen, an authentic Danish restaurant in Tribeca, is letting Revolving Dansk restaurant in Boerum Hill take over the kitchen on July 26. Instead of serving their Nordic menu, Revolving Dansk will serve up food from the streets of Denmark. Get a taste of their Dane hot dog topped with traditional Danish fixings like fried onions, remoulade and sweet pickles. Noon-4 p.m. 13 Laight St. See thecopenhagennyc.com.

            Food Around the World

            Eat your way through the culinary world at the 10th Annual Global Food and Wine Experience. Join more than 50 culinary students and New York’s best chefs on June 26 at Espace as they unveil the latest flavors in food trends. Foodies will enjoy samples paired with wine from select restaurants, winemakers and distributors from around the world. 7-10:30 p.m. $125. 635 W. 42nd St. See bcaglobal.org.

            Recommended Reading

            Jun 21, 2014
            Tina George

            Jewish food festivals unite history and culture in unusual locales

            For instance, Sher said that gathering outside bakeries on a Saturday night in London’s Golders Green neighborhood, which has a large Jewish population, is for many locals “as important as the Shabbat Kiddush in shul.”

            More traditionally, Sher said, “On Purim we eat with triumph pastries said to resemble the ears or hat of the wicked Haman. With even more charged emotions, at Pesach we retell our ancestors’ Egyptian exodus as though it were ours, with accompaniments of tears for our slavery (saltwater), the mortar of the pyramids we were forced to build (haroseth), and the unleavened bread that we hastily took with us (matzah).”

            “For the Jewish community, dishes reveal our roots, our diaspora wanderings, and also our modern practicalities and passions,” said Sher. “Through the dishes we cook or cling to—with fondness or inexplicable loyalty—we can relate to the cross-continental journeys of our ancestors, or evoke our childhood and families.”

            When the first Gefiltefest was held in October 2010, there were no similar Jewish food festivals, but now communities around the world “are beginning to host events based on the Gefiltefest model,” according to Sher. The festival is under Orthodox kosher supervision. 

            “We attract some of the biggest names in kosher food, and we are now the UK’s biggest kosher food festival,” he said.

            This year’s festival included exhibitors of kosher cuisine from Syria, Italy, Israel, Tunisia, and the Czech Republic. In cooking workshops, attendees are able to pickle their own herring, preserve lemons, make babaganoush, and bake challah.

            The annual event also features a popular Ashkenazi versus Sephardi cook-off and the announcement of the annual Gefiltefest-Jewish Chronicle Food Awards, for which the British public votes on the best kosher restaurants, bagels, and cheesecake in the months leading up to the festival.

            Gefiltefest 2014 also marks the launch of “The Gefiltefest Cookbook,” which features recipes from more than 50 internationally renowned chefs.

            “Perhaps belatedly, the value of our [Jewish] culinary heritage is now appreciated across the globe,” Sher said. “People have started to appreciate that food is an important way of uniting people to celebrate our history and culture.”

            Download this story in Microsoft Word format here.

            Recommended Reading

            Jun 21, 2014
            Tina George

            Share this Article

            Baked goods, including hamantashen, at the Jewish Food and Cultural Festival in Little Rock, Ark. Photo: Jewish Federation of Arkansas.

            JNS.org -Asheville, N.C., and Little Rock, Ark. Not exactly the Jewish capitals of America, but they are both home to major Jewish food festivals.

            From street vendors to strolling klezmer musicians, food festivals bring people together with traditional favorites, uniting history and culture. According to Marty Gillen, chairman of Asheville’s HardLox Jewish Food and Heritage Festival, the festival is the most important Jewish event of the year.

            “We have no Jewish deli in Asheville at this time,” Gillen toldJNS.org. “We say that HardLox is the only day of the year that you can get real Jewish food in Asheville.”

            A fundraiser for Congregation Beth HaTephila, the Reform temple in Asheville, HardLox is staffed by 250 volunteers. Visitors can nosh on corned beef on rye, potato knishes, kosher hot dogs, bagels, lox and cream cheese, chopped liver sandwiches, whitefish salad, and cheese blintzes. The Beth HaTephila sisterhood prepares 50 gallons of matzo ball soup and 30 large pans of noodle kugel.

            “It is our opportunity to share our food, our music, and our heritage with the greater Asheville community,” said Gillen. “The music helps maintain the Jewish atmosphere all day at the festival.”

            Little Rock’s Jewish Food and Cultural Festival, held in late April this year, brings together Jews from throughout the state of Arkansas not only to celebrate their shared heritage, but also to share their culture and traditions with a non-Jewish audience.

            “Since our own Jewish community numbers only around 2,000, most of the attendees at our festival are non-Jews, many of whom are experiencing Jewish food for the first time or for the only time that year, as Jewish staples like bagels and lox or kugel are not readily available in stores, and there is no Jewish delicatessen here,” said Marianne Tettlebaum, director of the Jewish Federation of Arkansas, which holds the festival.

            The festival’s average annual attendance is 10,000.

            “Our festival is a statewide effort,” Tettlebaum told JNS.org. “Volunteers in Jewish communities throughout the state bake, cook, and staff the booths.”

            Tettlebaum called Jewish food “a tangible and enjoyable example of shared religious and cultural traditions.”

            “I would describe Jewish food as any food that has religious significance or has been meaningful to a particular group of Jews on a broad scale for a certain period of time,” she said.

            The Arkansas festival also features cultural and religious booths that showcase various aspects of Jewish life, from Arkansas to ancient Israel. Booths include “Ask the Rabbi”; “Shalom Israel,” where volunteers from Israel or those knowledgeable about Israeli culture provide information about the Jewish state; a large model of the Western Wall where visitors can leave messages that make it to the Western Wall in Jerusalem; Ati’Day, which features activities for kids; and a booth with Chabad-Lubavitch rabbis offering hands-on Jewish activities, such as learning how to write in Hebrew.

            Overseas, Australia’s Sydney Jewish Food Festival sold out in its first year, 2012. France, Germany, Argentina, and Hungary are considering launching Jewish food festivals. The thriving Jewish food scene in England, meanwhile, is feted during the annual “Gefiltefest” food festival in London.

            The fifth annual Gefiltefest (named for the traditional Jewish appetizer, gefilte fish) takes places June 15. Dan Sher, the festival’s events and communications officer, said that while eating is universal, in the Jewish community “our food really matters.”

            “Eating is not just a casual enjoyment but an expression of our culture, history, philosophy and, for some, spirituality,” Sher told JNS.org. “Within the Jewish community, numerous social and spiritual rituals revolve around food.”

            For instance, Sher said that gathering outside bakeries on a Saturday night in London’s Golders Green neighborhood, which has a large Jewish population, is for many locals “as important as the Shabbat Kiddush in shul.”

            More traditionally, Sher said, “On Purim we eat with triumph pastries said to resemble the ears or hat of the wicked Haman. With even more charged emotions, at Pesach we retell our ancestors’ Egyptian exodus as though it were ours, with accompaniments of tears for our slavery (saltwater), the mortar of the pyramids we were forced to build (haroseth), and the unleavened bread that we hastily took with us (matzah).”

            “For the Jewish community, dishes reveal our roots, our diaspora wanderings, and also our modern practicalities and passions,” said Sher. “Through the dishes we cook or cling to—with fondness or inexplicable loyalty—we can relate to the cross-continental journeys of our ancestors, or evoke our childhood and families.”

            When the first Gefiltefest was held in October 2010, there were no similar Jewish food festivals, but now communities around the world “are beginning to host events based on the Gefiltefest model,” according to Sher. The festival is under Orthodox kosher supervision.

            “We attract some of the biggest names in kosher food, and we are now the UK’s biggest kosher food festival,” he said.

            This year’s festival includes exhibitors of kosher cuisine from Syria, Italy, Israel, Tunisia, and the Czech Republic. In cooking workshops, attendees are able to pickle their own herring, preserve lemons, make babaganoush, and bake challot.

            The event also features a popular Ashkenazi versus Sephardi cook-off and the announcement of the annual Gefiltefest-Jewish Chronicle Food Awards, for which the British public votes on the best kosher restaurants, bagels, and cheesecake in the months leading up to the festival.

            Gefiltefest 2014 also marks the launch of “The Gefiltefest Cookbook,” which features recipes from more than 50 other internationally renowned chefs.

            “Perhaps belatedly, the value of our [Jewish] culinary heritage is now appreciated across the globe,” Sher said. “People have started to appreciate that food is an important way of uniting people to celebrate our history and culture.”

            Recommended Reading

            Jun 20, 2014
            Tina George

            Sometimes in unexpected locations, Jewish food festivals unite history, culture

            Asheville, N.C., and Little Rock, Ark. Not exactly the Jewish capitals of America, but they are both home to major Jewish food festivals.

            From street vendors to strolling klezmer musicians, food festivals bring people together with traditional favorites, uniting history and culture. According to Marty Gillen, chairman of Asheville’s HardLox Jewish Food and Heritage Festival, the festival is the most important Jewish event of the year.  

            “We have no Jewish deli in Asheville at this time,” Gillen said. “We say that HardLox is the only day of the year that you can get real Jewish food in Asheville.”

            A fundraiser for Congregation Beth HaTephila, the Reform temple in Asheville, HardLox is staffed by 250 volunteers. Visitors can nosh on corned beef on rye, potato knishes, kosher hot dogs, bagels, lox and cream cheese, chopped-liver sandwiches, whitefish salad and cheese blintzes. The Beth HaTephila sisterhood prepares 50 gallons of matzo ball soup and 30 large pans of noodle kugel.

            “It is our opportunity to share our food, our music and our heritage with the greater Asheville community,” said Gillen. “The music helps maintain the Jewish atmosphere all day at the festival.”

            Little Rock’s Jewish Food and Cultural Festival, held in late April this year, brings together Jews from throughout Arkansas not only to celebrate their shared heritage, but also to share their culture and traditions with a non-Jewish audience.

            “Since our own Jewish community numbers only around 2,000, most of the attendees at our festival are non-Jews, many of whom are experiencing Jewish food for the first time or for the only time that year, as Jewish staples like bagels and lox or kugel are not readily available in stores, and there is no Jewish delicatessen here,” said Marianne Tettlebaum, director of the Jewish Federation of Arkansas, which holds the festival.

            The festival’s average annual attendance is 10,000.  

            “Our festival is a statewide effort,” Tettlebaum said. “Volunteers in Jewish communities throughout the state bake, cook and staff the booths.”

            Tettlebaum called Jewish food “a tangible and enjoyable example of shared religious and cultural traditions.”

            “I would describe Jewish food as any food that has religious significance or has been meaningful to a particular group of Jews on a broad scale for a certain period of time,” she said.

            The Arkansas festival also features cultural and religious booths that showcase various aspects of Jewish life, from Arkansas to ancient Israel. Booths include “Ask the Rabbi”; “Shalom Israel,” where volunteers from Israel or those knowledgeable about Israeli culture provide information about the Jewish state; a large model of the Western Wall, where visitors can leave messages that make it to the Western Wall in Jerusalem; Ati’Day, which features activities for kids; and a booth with Chabad-Lubavitch rabbis offering hands-on Jewish activities, such as learning how to write in Hebrew.

            Overseas, Australia’s Sydney Jewish Food Festival sold out in its first year, 2012. France, Germany, Argentina and Hungary are considering launching Jewish food festivals. The thriving Jewish food scene in England, meanwhile, is feted during the annual “Gefiltefest” food festival in London.

            The fifth annual Gefiltefest took place on June 15. Dan Sher, the festival’s events and communications officer, said that while eating is universal, in the Jewish community “our food really matters.

            “Eating is not just a casual enjoyment but an expression of our culture, history, philosophy and, for some, spirituality,” Sher said. “Within the Jewish community, numerous social and spiritual rituals revolve around food.”

            For instance, Sher said that gathering outside bakeries on a Saturday night in London’s Golders Green neighborhood, which has a large Jewish population, is for many locals “as important as the Shabbat Kiddush in shul.”

            More traditionally, Sher said, “On Purim we eat with triumph pastries said to resemble the ears or hat of the wicked Haman. With even more charged emotions, at Pesach we retell our ancestors’ Egyptian exodus as though it were ours, with accompaniments of tears for our slavery (saltwater), the mortar of the pyramids we were forced to build (haroseth) and the unleavened bread that we hastily took with us (matzah).”

            “For the Jewish community, dishes reveal our roots, our diaspora wanderings and also our modern practicalities and passions,” said Sher. “Through the dishes we cook or cling to — with fondness or inexplicable loyalty — we can relate to the cross-continental journeys of our ancestors or evoke our childhood and families.”

            When the first Gefiltefest was held in October 2010, there were no similar Jewish food festivals, but now communities around the world “are beginning to host events based on the Gefiltefest model,” according to Sher. The festival is under Orthodox kosher supervision.

            “We attract some of the biggest names in kosher food, and we are now the U.K.’s biggest kosher food festival,” he said.

            This year’s festival includes exhibitors of kosher cuisine from Syria, Italy, Israel, Tunisia, and the Czech Republic. In cooking workshops, attendees are able to pickle their own herring, preserve lemons, make baba ganoush and bake challot.

            The event also features a popular Ashkenazi versus Sephardi cook-off and the announcement of the annual Gefiltefest-Jewish Chronicle [England] Food Awards, for which the British public votes on the best kosher restaurants, bagels and cheesecake in the months leading up to the festival.

            Gefiltefest 2014 also marks the launch of “The Gefiltefest Cookbook,” which features recipes from more than 50 other internationally renowned chefs.

            “Perhaps belatedly, the value of our [Jewish] culinary heritage is now appreciated across the globe,” Sher said. “People have started to appreciate that food is an important way of uniting people to celebrate our history and culture.”

            Recommended Reading

            Jun 20, 2014
            Tina George

            Food festivals spice up summer’s first two days

            At 1 p.m., Alexandria restaurants will have the chance to face off in a competition that will determine who serves the best appetizer, main course, and dessert in town.

            Walker’s Grille, a 3-year-old American fare restaurant, won the main course portion of the contest last year with a scallop dish and the year before that with short ribs. Co-owner Sam Misleh is looking forward to his surf-and-turf dish “bringing home a three-peat.”

            Master of ceremonies Tommy McFly, the morning anchor for 94.7 Fresh FM, will announce the contest winners at 2:30 p.m.

            The festival includes performances by a Quimboa Jazz band, Gina DeSimone The Moaners, Zumba demonstrations, and a Children’s Corner complete with a moon bounce, and arts and craft activities.

            Attendance is free, but $15 tickets are required to taste test both the food and wine. A portion of the proceeds will be donated to Volunteer Alexandria, a nonprofit group. John Carlyle Square is located three blocks from the Kings Cross Metro Station.

            The seventh annual Northern Virginia Summer BrewFest begins at noon Saturday at Morven Park in Leesburg, Va.

            Expecting to garner its largest crowd yet, the BrewFest will feature American brews from more than 60 microbreweries from around the country, 19 of which are new to the festival this year.

            “It’s not surprising that the festival is growing and gaining popularity, considering the fact that the craft beer industry is really booming right now,” festival manager Bill Collins said.

            Each adult will be given a 4.75 oz. souvenir glass upon entering and four beer sampling tickets. Additional tickets can be purchased for $1 apiece.

            “It’s only 4 ounces because craft beer is the focus, not just solely consuming lots of beer, but really tasting it,” Mr. Collins said.

            New this year are cooking-with-beer demonstrations by military chef Joe Mariano. Along with The Guiding Knife and Port City Brewery, Mr. Mariano has concocted several recipes using beer as the star ingredient. In four demonstrations Saturday and three Sunday, he will show how to use beer in pickled carrots, salad dressings, sauces, even cheesecake.

            The festival includes 12 food vendors and 49 nonfood vendors selling everything from jewelry and candles to window remodeling.

            It’s open noon to 9 p.m. Saturday and noon to 7 p.m. Sunday. Tickets are $20 in advance and $30 at the gate; designated drivers can enter for $10 in advance and $15 at the gate. Children under 16 accompanied by an adult can enter for free.

            Parking is free.

            Recommended Reading

            Jun 19, 2014
            Tina George

            Anthony Anderson Discovers America’s Best Food Festivals On New Food …

            NEW YORK, June 16, 2014 /PRNewswire/ – Anthony Anderson is on a mission to discover the most flavorful food festivals in the country on the new primetime series, Food Fest Nation, premiering Monday, July 21st at 9pm ET/PT on Food Network. Tasting everything from classic interpretations of regional fare to surprising twists of favorite foods, Anthony uncovers what is truly at the heart of America – one delicious food festival at a time.

            “Viewers got a taste of Anthony Anderson’s true passion for food during his appearances as a judge on Iron Chef America and Chopped,” said Bob Tuschman, General Manager and Senior Vice President, Food Network. “Anthony’s love of food, quick humor, and engaging way with people make him the perfect guide through the quirky and wonderful world of food festivals.”

            Over the course of eight half-hour episodes, Anthony visits the most unique food fairs in the nation, sampling local specialties and meeting the characters devoted to the regional cuisine. Along the way, Anthony visits the Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival in Fernandina Beach, Fla. and highlights delicious classics such as shrimp tacos, shrimp boil and shrimp jambalaya, as well as innovative shrimp ice cream. In one episode, he attends the Magnolia Blossom Festival World Championship Steak Cook-Off in Magnolia, Ark., where over 4,000 different kinds of mouthwatering ribeye steaks compete to be the best of the best and for a $10,000 prize. Anthony also visits the Long Grove Strawberry Festival, where over 20,000 attendees flock to Long Grove, Ill. for three “berry” special days of enjoying all things strawberry, including Strawberry Ricotta Ravioli and Strawberry Balsamic Chicken. In another episode, he stops by Ribfest Chicago for a world-class rib-eating showdown that draws top competitive eaters from around the globe. Throughout the season, Anthony also gets a taste of the South Carolina Poultry Festival in Batesberg, S.C., the Jambalaya Festival in Gonzalez, La., the Blue Ridge BBQ Festival in Tyron, N.C., as well as the Rockwood Ice Cream Festival in Wilmington, Del.

            Fans can visit FoodNetwork.com/FoodFestNation all season long for additional video, blogs and photo galleries from Anthony’s travels, as well as connect on Twitter with the hashtag #FoodFestNation.

            Anthony Anderson is no stranger to the Food Network audience, having competed on Chopped and appeared as both a judge and competitor on Iron Chef America, making his transition to host of Food Fest Nation a natural and delicious progression. He is an accomplished actor with roles on both the big and small screen, including over 20 films and the Emmy® Award-winning drama Law Order, playing Detective Kevin Bernard. His performance on that series earned him four consecutive NAACP Image Award nominations for Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series. Anthony also appeared in the DreamWorks’ blockbuster Transformers, directed by Michael Bay; as well as in Martin Scorsese’s Oscar® winning feature, The Departed. Anthony can also be seen in the upcoming ABC sitcom, Black-ish, this fall, in which he will both star and produce.

            Food Fest Nation is produced by Magnetic Productions.

            FOOD NETWORK (www.foodnetwork.com) is a unique lifestyle network, website and magazine that connects viewers to the power and joy of food. The network strives to be viewers’ best friend in food and is committed to leading by teaching, inspiring, empowering and entertaining through its talent and expertise. Food Network is distributed to more than 100 million U.S. households and up to 35 million unique web users monthly. Since launching in 2009, Food Network Magazine’s rate base has grown tenfold and is now the second largest monthly magazine on the newsstand, with over 11.6 million readers. Headquartered in New York, Food Network has a growing international presence with programming in more than 150 countries, including 24-hour networks in the United Kingdom, Asia, and the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region. Scripps Networks Interactive (NYSE: SNI), which also owns and operates Cooking Channel (www.cookingchanneltv.com), HGTV (www.hgtv.com), DIY Network (www.diynetwork.com), Travel Channel (www.travelchannel.com) and Great American Country (www.gactv.com), is the manager and general partner.

            SOURCE Food Network

            Recommended Reading

            Jun 18, 2014
            Tina George

            Anthony Anderson discovers America’s best food festivals on new Food Network …

            Series premiere Monday, July
            21, at 9 p.m.

            Anthony
            Anderson is on a mission to discover the most flavorful food festivals in
            the country on the new primetime series, “Food Fest Nation,” premiering Monday,
            July 21, at 9 p.m. on Food Network. Tasting everything from classic
            interpretations of regional fare to surprising twists of favorite foods, Anderson
            uncovers what is truly at the heart of America – one delicious food festival at
            a time.

            “Viewers
            got a taste of Anthony Anderson’s true passion for food during his appearances
            as a judge on ‘Iron Chef America’ and ‘Chopped,’ ” said Bob Tuschman, general
            manager and senior vice president at Food Network. “Anthony’s love of
            food, quick humor, and engaging way with people make him the perfect guide
            through the quirky and wonderful world of food festivals.”

            Over
            the course of eight half-hour episodes, Anderson visits the most unique food
            fairs in the nation, sampling local specialties and meeting the characters
            devoted to the regional cuisine. Along the way, he visits the Isle of Eight
            Flags Shrimp Festival in Fernandina Beach, Florida, and highlights delicious
            classics such as shrimp tacos, shrimp boil and shrimp jambalaya, as well as
            innovative shrimp ice cream.

            In
            one episode, Anderson attends the Magnolia Blossom Festival World
            Championship Steak Cook-Off in Magnolia, Arkansas, where more than 4,000
            different kinds of mouthwatering rib-eye steaks compete to be the best of the
            best and for a $10,000 prize. He also visits the Long Grove Strawberry
            Festival, where more than 20,000 attendees flock to Long Grove, Illinois, for
            three “berry” special days of enjoying all things strawberry,
            including strawberry ricotta ravioli and strawberry balsamic chicken.

            In
            another episode, he stops by Ribfest Chicago for a world-class rib-eating
            showdown that draws top competitive eaters from around the globe. Throughout
            the season, Anderson also gets a taste of the South Carolina Poultry Festival
            in Batesberg; the Jambalaya Festival in Gonzalez, Louisiana; the Blue Ridge BBQ
            Festival in Tyron, North Carolina; as well as the Rockwood Ice Cream Festival
            in Wilmington, Delaware.

            Fans
            can visit FoodNetwork.com/FoodFestNation
            all season long for additional video, blogs and photo galleries from Anthony’s
            travels, as well as connect on Twitter with the hashtag #FoodFestNation.

            Recommended Reading

            Jun 16, 2014
            Tina George

            Anthony Anderson Discovers America’s Best Food Festivals on New Food …

            ANTHONY ANDERSON DISCOVERS AMERICA’S BEST FOOD FESTIVALS ON NEW FOOD NETWORK SERIES “FOOD FEST NATION”

            Series Premiere Monday, July 21st at 9pm ET/PT on Food Network

            NEW YORK – June 16, 2014 – Anthony Anderson is on a mission to discover the most flavorful food festivals in the country on the new primetime series, Food Fest Nation, premiering Monday, July 21st at 9pm ET/PT on Food Network. Tasting everything from classic interpretations of regional fare to surprising twists of favorite foods, Anthony uncovers what is truly at the heart of America – one delicious food festival at a time.

            “Viewers got a taste of Anthony Anderson’s true passion for food during his appearances as a judge on Iron Chef America and Chopped,” said Bob Tuschman, General Manager and Senior Vice President, Food Network. “Anthony’s love of food, quick humor, and engaging way with people make him the perfect guide through the quirky and wonderful world of food festivals.”

            Over the course of eight half-hour episodes, Anthony visits the most unique food fairs in the nation, sampling local specialties and meeting the characters devoted to the regional cuisine. Along the way, Anthony visits the Isle of Eight Flags Shrimp Festival in Fernandina Beach, Fla. and highlights delicious classics such as shrimp tacos, shrimp boil and shrimp jambalaya, as well as innovative shrimp ice cream. In one episode, he attends the Magnolia Blossom Festival World Championship Steak Cook-Off in Magnolia, Ark., where over 4,000 different kinds of mouthwatering ribeye steaks compete to be the best of the best and for a $10,000 prize. Anthony also visits the Long Grove Strawberry Festival, where over 20,000 attendees flock to Long Grove, Ill. for three “berry” special days of enjoying all things strawberry, including Strawberry Ricotta Ravioli and Strawberry Balsamic Chicken. In another episode, he stops by Ribfest Chicago for a world-class rib-eating showdown that draws top competitive eaters from around the globe. Throughout the season, Anthony also gets a taste of the South Carolina Poultry Festival in Batesberg, S.C., the Jambalaya Festival in Gonzalez, La., the Blue Ridge BBQ Festival in Tyron, N.C., as well as the Rockwood Ice Cream Festival in Wilmington, Del.

            Fans can visit FoodNetwork.com/FoodFestNation all season long for additional video, blogs and photo galleries from Anthony’s travels, as well as connect on Twitter with the hashtag #FoodFestNation.

            Anthony Anderson is no stranger to the Food Network audience, having competed on Chopped and appeared as both a judge and competitor on Iron Chef America, making his transition to host of Food Fest Nation a natural and delicious progression. He is an accomplished actor with roles on both the big and small screen, including over 20 films and the Emmy(R) Award-winning drama Law Order, playing Detective Kevin Bernard. His performance on that series earned him four consecutive NAACP Image Award nominations for Outstanding Actor in a Drama Series. Anthony also appeared in the DreamWorks’ blockbuster Transformers, directed by Michael Bay; as well as in Martin Scorsese’s Oscar(R) winning feature, The Departed. Anthony can also be seen in the upcoming ABC sitcom, Black-ish, this fall, in which he will both star and produce.

            Food Fest Nation is produced by Magnetic Productions.

            # #

            FOOD NETWORK (www.foodnetwork.com) is a unique lifestyle network, website and magazine that connects viewers to the power and joy of food. The network strives to be viewers’ best friend in food and is committed to leading by teaching, inspiring, empowering and entertaining through its talent and expertise. Food Network is distributed to more than 100 million U.S. households and up to 35 million unique web users monthly. Since launching in 2009, Food Network Magazine’s rate base has grown tenfold and is now the second largest monthly magazine on the newsstand, with over 11.6 million readers. Headquartered in New York, Food Network has a growing international presence with programming in more than 150 countries, including 24-hour networks in the United Kingdom, Asia, and the Europe, Middle East and Africa (EMEA) region. Scripps Networks Interactive (NYSE: SNI), which also owns and operates Cooking Channel (www.cookingchanneltv.com), HGTV (www.hgtv.com), DIY Network (www.diynetwork.com), Travel Channel (www.travelchannel.com) and Great American Country (www.gactv.com), is the manager and general partner.

            Recommended Reading

            Pages:«1...25262728293031...198»
            About - Contact - Privacy - Terms of Service