Browsing articles in "food trucks"
Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Fiesta still draws crowd to Mercer County Park despite rain

WEST WINDSOR — The first Food Truck Fiesta, despite the bad weather, has still drawn a crowd.

The event, taking place in Mercer County Park, runs until 7 p.m.

Thirteen trucks are on hand, including the Surf and Turf Truck, The Cow and the Curd, Cupcake Carnivale, Dark Side of the Moo, Catering by Fred’s Kitchen, Kevin’s Salad Station, Kami, Lombardi Pizza Co., The Outslider, Oink and Moo BBQ, The Taco Truck, The Tot Cart and Underground Donuts.

Unionville Winery will showcase some of their 22 wines.

Admission to the event is free. Mercer County Park is located at 334 South Post Road in West Windsor.


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Mercer County Park is located at 334 S. Post Road, West Windsor.

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Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Tampa food truck rally sets Guinness World Record

The World’s Largest Food Truck Rally lived up to its name Saturday when it set a new Guinness World Record for holding the largest food truck parade, organizers said.

More than 121 food trucks lined up at the Florida State Fairgrounds for the official Guinness count, shattering the old record of 62 trucks set in Miami last year, said Jennifer O’Brien, a Florida State Fair Authority spokeswoman. About 170 trucks participated in the Generation Food Truck event, but only trucks with photographs of food on them were included in the official number.

The event continues Sunday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. with bands, a kids’ play zone and adult thrill rides and games. Admission is free; parking is $6 per vehicle. See facebook.com/GenerationFoodTruck.

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Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Friday brings more dining options to Tupelo

If you haven’t heard, two of the three food trucks now operating in Tupelo are serving lunch today in downtown Tupelo. Food Truck Friday

It’s Food Truck Friday, and Local Mobile and Memphis Style BBQ on Wheels have set up shop in Fairpark in front of City Hall on Main Street.

Two Dudes Mexican Foods wasn’t able to make it this week, as the owners are making modifications on their truck.

Curt McLellan, who opened the city’s first food truck, Local Mobile, last year, said he welcomed more food trucks.

“I think it’s great – it gives people more opportunities to try eating at food trucks,” he said. “We’ve got totally different menus, different price points. … it’s like having a food court at the mall, except we’re here, outside.”

Read more in tomorrow’s Daily Journal.

 

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Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Friday: Rice Box Truck gives new meaning to ‘fast food’

HOUSTON — The Rice Box Truck specializes in your favorite guilty-pleasure Chinese food.  John Peterson, the guy behind “the Box” frequently serves up lunch at his alma mater, the University of Houston.

“I studied business right over there at Melcher Hall,” he explained, pointing down the road.

During his studies, Peterson traveled to China and picked up a passion for the food, which he re-created for the American palate at The Rice Box.

“I just keep it simple, ‘cause the reality is, it is fast food Chinese food — General Tso’s Chicken, sesame, sweet and sour, these are all things I survived on when we were in college,” he said of his food philosophy.

Around campus, Peterson is best known for his General Tso’s Chicken – a twice-fried favorite he drenches in a secret homemade sauce.

From the familiar red and white boxes, to the disposable chopstix and eggrolls, “The Rice Box” is everything you love about Chinese take-out, but out of a truck, and a fast one at that.

“This truck does 0-60 in about 15 seconds — pretty competitive on the street with other food trucks,” he said with a laugh.

Peterson is not just a food guy, he’s also car guy. “Powered by Rice” is proudly stenciled on the front of the truck – a clever reference to the so-called “Ricer” import automotive-culture.  Before the self-taught chef got into food, he set up a blog with half a million Facebook followers across the world, who now follow his food truck, too.

“It’s us putting Houston on their map,” he said.

From fast food to fast cars, Peterson said he’s happy he returned to Houston to serve the school that helped make it all happen. 

“It is like the universe put me back out here,” he said.

Peterson is planning to open a second truck within the next few weeks.  He frequently serves the UH campus and the Montrose area.  You can follow him on Twitter @RiceBoxTruck. 

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Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Three pieces of food truck news

Three pieces of food truck news: one good, two bad

1

Food Truck rallies resume on Sunday: After a long, cold winter, Wichita’s food truckers are ready to resume their monthly gatherings, which they try to make happen on the last Sunday of the month. This month’s happens from noon to 3 p.m. Sunday at the Wichita WaterWalk, 515 S. Main. The lineup includes B.S. Sandwich Press, Hopperoni Express, Let’m Eat Brats and The Flying Stove, and all will be serving up Cajun specialties. Before the trucks start serving, Firefly Yoga Studio will put on an outdoor yoga class from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. It’s free, but donations will be accepted.

2

Cake Face is closing: Cake Face Bake Shop, which opened its food truck in 2012, was supposed to be at the rally this weekend but won’t be. Owners Summer and Dave Schoenhals are moving to Oregon for a job opportunity and have closed their business. The couple is selling the truck, an 18×8 upgrade they bought in August. They’ve posted an ad offering the truck and all of its contents for sale on Craigslist.

3

The Rolling Dough also is closed: The food truckers who last summer bought the Schoenhals’ original rig have closed, too. Joseph and Cherre Nestelroad, who opened their pizza food truck last fall, posted last week on the truck’s Facebook wall that they have too much going on in their lives, especially with two small children, to keep the business going. The post indicated that the couple was open to considering giving it another go when their kids are older.

Quick bites

Lotus Leaf on the move

Don’t go to Delano planning to dine at Lotus Leaf Cafe, which opened at 613 W. Douglas in November of 2010. The restaurant has begun its move to a much larger space at 215 N. Washington, right next door to Taste See in Old Town. The Delano spot closed on Saturday. The restaurant owners say the goal is to reopen by 11 a.m. Tuesday with additions such as a coffee/juice/smoothie bar, organic wine and beer and more menu items. To follow along with the reopening, visit the restaurant’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Lotusleafcafe.

Two wine dinners

Wine drinkers have two approaching events to choose from. One is a farewell-to-winter event scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday at Oeno, the wine bar at 330 N. Mead. The dinner is $40 a person and will feature three springlike courses paired with three wines, plus dessert. Gazpacho, lamb chops and seared scallops are on the menu. For reservations, call 316-440-5000. Then, on Tuesday, Hereford House at 1400 Terradyne St. in Andover will put on a wine event featuring a dinner and three wines. Attendees keep the three Riedel brand glasses the wine is poured in. The event starts at 6 p.m. and costs $150 a person for wine and an additional $40 for dinner. For reservations, call 316-260-6600.

Sixth annual Scottish Rite Pancake Feed

The sixth annual Scottish Rite Pancake Feed, an all-you-can-eat Chris Cakes feast that raises money for the historical Scottish Rite Center, 332 E. First St., is Tuesday. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and dinner will be served from 5 to 7 p.m. Admission is $5 at the door. For more information, call 316-263-4218.

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Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food truck vendors donate portion of sales to hit-and-run victim

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) – Grab a bite to eat at a food truck on Main and Vine Streets anytime before 7:00 Friday night, and 10 percent of the cost will go towards the Barbara Screeney Medical Fund.

Screeney is part-owner of the ‘That’s How We Roll’ food truck. But last November, family members say she was walking home along Old Frankfort Pike, after leaving one of her three jobs, when a car hit her.

Police still have not found the driver responsible. Screeney spent several weeks at UK Hospital, and Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital, and she is still recovering from a traumatic brain injury.

Family members say numerous medical bills have been piling up since Screeney’s accident. That’s why the other food truck vendors in Lexington are doing what they can to help out their friend.

“I think it’s nice of everybody to do this and we’re going to keep doing this until hopefully she gets better,” says Tracy Latham, a food truck vendor.

Food trucks will be set up until 7:00 p.m. on Friday.

To donate to Screeney’s medical fund online, click on the link in this article.

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Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food truck craze expands in downtown Waco – Waco Tribune

More tasty bites are being served in downtown Waco as new food trucks capitalize on the increased development and activity in the area.


The latest mobile restaurants to roll into downtown include Greek-influenced Xristo’s, stationed at the corner of University Parks Drive and Franklin Avenue, and What About Wednesday’s Express, which is parked at South Eighth Street and Franklin Avenue and serves burgers, sandwiches, wraps and salads. Both opened this month.

“You just don’t know when you start something if it’s going to work (or) if it’s not … and it’s just been unbelievable for us,” said Xristo’s owner Stephanie Garman, who grew up with a Greek mother and Lebanese father. “We’ve had people, in just the couple weeks we’ve been open, who have been back three or four times.”

Last summer, dessert company Vanilla Bean Bake Shoppe opened in a 1971 Airstream trailer at Franklin Avenue and South Fifth Street. Meanwhile, GK Hot Dogs Inc. is celebrating its one-year anniversary at South Seventh Street and Austin Avenue.

Another truck, Boardwalk on Elm, is starting up on the edge of downtown in East Waco. Austin Avenue restaurant Sergio’s has also set up a food truck in front of Dichotomy Coffee Spirits to accommodate lunch crowds while the full-service diner now primarily serves evening meals.

The trucks generally aim to attract downtown-area employees during the work week, though Xristo’s is also open on Saturdays and Sundays.

Chris McGowan, vice president of urban development for the Greater Waco Chamber of Commerce, said having food trucks downtown is among the priorities outlined in strategic plans crafted by the chamber and the city’s Imagine Waco initiative.

“It kind of creates a dynamic scene,” McGowan said. “People are excited about food trucks and there’s been kind of an explosion of those things happening around the U.S. It provides more interesting things for people to do in downtown.”

The increase in food trucks in the past year is a testament to the growth of new residential properties and businesses in downtown in recent years.

“Having added 900 and some-odd residential units in the downtown area in the past five years has certainly helped,” McGowan said. “Seeing close to half a billion dollars worth of new development activity in downtown and along the river has certainly helped create an opportunity for new businesses.

“All of the momentum that has been gathering is continuing to build opportunity for new businesses, whether they’re mobile or brick-and-mortar or what have you.”

Food trucks can also serve as a more cost-efficient method of breaking into the restaurant business and help a first-time business owner build clientele and test out menu options before launching a static restaurant, McGowan said.

That’s Juan Villarreal’s plan for What About Wednesdays Express food truck. The truck is parked next to a former office space he and business partner Connor Elliott have leased and plan to transform into an American-style restaurant.

Villarreal hopes to open What About Wednesday’s Bar and Grill on the corner of South Eighth Street and Franklin Avenue by June that will also serve seafood, steak and pasta. He previously ran a grill of the same name near the Lake Waco Golf Course, and closed it when the lease expired in November as the facility transitioned to new management.

The name is a spin-off of restaurants branded by days of the week, such as Ruby Tuesday and TGI Friday’s.

“Our food truck seemed like the other option we had to do to keep expanding ourselves as a small business,” Villarreal said. “With more lofts and more living coming up in the downtown area, that’s only going to improve business for all of us.”

In the meantime, the food truck will help market the location and drum up a customer base. What About Wednesday’s also has free delivery to downtown and Baylor, and they’ve had steady runs to customers in surrounding buildings like the neighboring federal courthouse, Insurers of Texas on Austin Avenue and the Baylor University School of Social Work on Washington Avenue, he said.

Once the restaurant is fully up and running, Villarreal plans to move the truck to the Baylor area and operate both sites simultaneously.

“Food trucks are a big deal and they’re a big craze, and I would like to see Baylor and Waco get a little more involved with it,” Villarreal said. “Every big university town has them, and I just feel that Waco needs to catch up. The locals are loving them.”

Garman said she and her husband, Christopher, have long dreamt of having their own downtown cafe, but delayed the plans as their family kept expanding to now include six kids. She began considering the idea of opening a food truck about two years ago after seeing the expansion of mobile food vendors near downtown Austin.

“It’s great for us because, having six children, you really can’t make everybody happy at the same time usually when you go out to eat,” Garman said. “We found that when we’d go to these food truck parks, everybody can find something to eat, and we could sit outside and everybody was happy. We just kind of came to the conclusion, ‘This could be how we could start, and it wouldn’t be quite as scary.’”

Now Xristo’s has become a family endeavor. The name is a spin on the nickname of her only son, 13-year-old Christopher who goes by “Christo.” Two of her daughters drew the figures that adorn the outside of the truck, and the older Garman kids all help serve customers when they are not in school.

The truck’s location has drawn business from visitors to Indian Spring Park, guests at the nearby Waco Hilton and the Courtyard by Marriott, as well as Baylor students and downtown workers. Garman said she is leasing the spot from Brazos River Partners 1, which has plans to build a hotel at the site in the future, but that several residents have inquired about creating their own food businesses alongside Xristo’s.

McGowan said he also has spoken with other people who have expressed interest in starting food trucks downtown, though he declined to discuss the specific ideas being floated.

Garman said when she was a child, downtown was filled with restaurant options and department stores and was considered a prime recreational area for visitors and residents alike. She believes more food trucks and development could elevate the area once again.

“I think Waco is ready for this,” Garman said. “I think we have just an influx of young people that are used to living in other cities where downtown is the place to be, where you walk everywhere and everything is there and close. We wish there were 10 trucks on the lot with us.”

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Mar 28, 2014
Kim Rivers

Cinnamon Snail wins Silver Spatula Award as best NJ food truck; The Taco … – The Star

The Cinnamon Snail is the winner of the first-ever Silver Spatula Award for top food truck in New Jersey.

The popular vegan lunch truck garnered the most votes of the 4,000-plus cast in an online poll that was part of a week-long series on food trucks in Inside Jersey magazine.

Cinnamon Snail has been serving “maniacal vegan goodies” since Valentine’s Day 2010, says owner Adam Sobel.

His reaction to winning the award?

“I am so wonderfully ecstatic about this news that I just ran through a cookie brick wall into a deadly moat of melted fudge,” he said.

Yep, sure sounds like the free-spirited Sobel.

The truck, which can be found in New York City and in Red Bank, has built a devoted if not fanatical following. Never tried vegan or organic food? Stop at the Snail; it may change your mind, if not your life.

The truck’s Thanksgiving sandoo was named one of the top 20 food truck dishes in Inside Jersey’s Ultimate Jersey Food Truck Showdown series. A Cinnamon Snail Cookbook is due this fall.

Here is the account of
the Munchmobile’s visit to the Cinnamon Snail in the summer of 2010.

The Taco Truck, like the Cinnamon Snail one of the first specialty food trucks to gain a foothold in New Jersey, placed second in the online poll. The truck’s pork torta also was named to the list of the state’s 20 best truck dishes.

Oink and Moo BBQ finished third in the voting.

The breakdown of the voting can be found here. Voting ended at midnight last Friday.

The entire Ultimate Jersey Food Truck Showdown series — beware, it will make you hungry — can be found here.

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Mar 28, 2014
Kim Rivers

NYC Food Truck Lunch: Yume Teriyaki Grill

A new food truck pared by our office on Wednesday called Yume Teriyaki Grill. They have been around for a month or so, but mainly parked downtown by Wall St. Now it looks like they have 2 outlets, a food truck in midtown and a food cart downtown.

The menu is obviously teriyaki-based, but there are 7 different choices ranging from $6-11, including a veggie option.

Being big seafood lovers, we went for the shrimp teriyaki for $8. Steak and salmon teriyaki are the only dishes over $10.

We didn’t know this, but their website says “yaki” means grill in Japanese and “teri” means shine, as in glazed.

Each meal comes with white or brown rice, gyoza or sauteed veggies, and a salad with either balsamic or raspberry vinaigrette dressing.

There were 10 small-to-medium-sized shrimp in the order, with a light, slightly fruity teriyaki sauce and sesame seeds on top.

The shrimp didn’t appear to be grilled, or if they were, it was very lightly. We understand they want to keep the shrimp juicy and not have them dry out, but there was no noticeable “grilled” flavor on the shrimp.

(credit: Perry R.)

(credit: Perry R.)

With a choice of fried dumplings or steamed veggies, we chose the healthy alternative (for once). The assorted vegetables included broccoli, carrots, , snow peas, water chestnuts and string beans. They were similar to what you get with a hibachi meal, but once again, not grilled much, if at all.

The brown rice was really good, especially with the teriyaki sauce. We need to order brown rice more often instead of white rice.

Salads are usually an afterthought in street food, but the quality of the greens was high, and the balsamic vinaigrette was a step up from the usual street food salad dressing. They also have a raspberry vinaigrette dressing that we want to try next time.

Yume Teritaki Grill is not the most original street food vendor in NYC, but this was a fairly healthy, varied, good lunch for $8.

You can find Yume Teriyaki Grill on Twitter here or on the Mobile Munchies Twitter feed.

(credit: Perry R.)

(credit: Perry R.)

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