Browsing articles in "food trucks"
May 17, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Feast rolls into Harrisburg with free parking – The Patriot

Organizers of the Harrisburg Food Truck Feast want to make sure it’s known parking at the event is free.

The feast will take place 5-9 p.m. today (May 16) at 1601 N. Third St. in midtown Harrisburg with about eight mobile food vendors dishing out chicken, pizza, barbecue, grilled cheese and ice cream.

Organizer Olivia Madrigal, who operates MAD Sandwiches food truck in Harrisburg with her husband, Rodrigo, said comments she had read on Facebook and news sites indicated some people were under the impression they had to pay to park.

The city has implemented new metered parking rates which clock in at $3 per hour and run weekdays and on Saturdays until 7 p.m.

Madrigal said those attending the feast can park for free in the parking lot on North Third Street where the food trucks gather.

The feast is part of the 3rd in the Burg. Entertainment will be provided by BazElle, a DJ duo made up of Bazooka and Elle ruvElle.

Participating trucks this month will include: Up in Smoke, Forno Inferno, MAD Sandwiches, Ice Cream Express, Mad Dash Artisan Grilled Cheese, Grills Goin’ Wild, Baron Von Schwein and The Chicken Truck.

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May 17, 2014
Kim Rivers

Marijuana From a Food Truck?



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The debate whether marijuana is nature’s miracle medicine or a dangerous substance rages on.

Meanwhile, in some states — where the drug is legal for medical and even recreational use — more marijuana edibles are popping up every day to help treat medical conditions. We’re also heading into the high time for recreational use. (More teens try marijuana during the summer than any other season, according to a 2004 study.)

(MORE: 10 Amazing Uses for Marijuana)

The newest edible on the market: MagicalButter’s marijuana food truck. The Seattle-based company makes “botanical extractors” for your kitchen, or appliances that pull the active ingredients out of the plants of your choice (usually cannabis) to create oils and sauces. MagicalButter partnered with another company to create, The Samich, a marijuana-infused food truck.

On the menu, The Samich has pulled pork sandwiches, peanut butter and jelly and grilled cheese with tomato soup, each made with butter, oil or cheese infused with THC, the active ingredient in marijuana.

The truck made headlines when it debuted at Denver’s Cannabis Cup, a sort of marijuana trade show. This debut was mostly a marketing ploy, however. Pot is legal for recreational use in Denver, but it’s also highly regulated by the state and can’t be sold out of a privately owned food truck.

(MORE: 15 Shocking Facts You Don’t Know About Weed)

“In Seattle, we have caregivers,” MagicalButter CEO Garyn Angel told weather.com. “So we can actually have our caregivers give it to their patients, which is how we’re going to do it to begin with.” The truck has only been around since April, so they’re still ironing things out with state and city regulators.

Angel also wants to conduct “dispensary tours,” where the food truck’s chefs “teach the patients at dispensaries how to cook incredible meals with cannabis to treat their ailments.” (Now, the company posts THC-infused recipes on its website.)

“[The food truck] gives a good platform to educate people about how to eat with cannabis, finding out what works, what might not work,” Angel told NPR’s The Salt. “It’s a non-threatening way for people to discover if it helps them at all.”

MORE ON WEATHER.COM: Marijuana and More Healing Plants from Around the World

1 / 22

Pacific yew (West Coast of North America): The active ingredient in yew bark fights cancer by stopping tumors from forming. (New York Botanical Garden)


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May 17, 2014
Kim Rivers

Marijuana From a Food Truck?



Overlay

  • A Food Truck For Pot!A Food Truck For Pot!
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  • Cheetah Pops In On Safari GoersCheetah Pops In On Safari Goers
  • Floating Pile of Trash? Look Closer!Floating Pile of Trash? Look Closer!

The debate whether marijuana is nature’s miracle medicine or a dangerous substance rages on.

Meanwhile, in some states — where the drug is legal for medical and even recreational use — more marijuana edibles are popping up every day to help treat medical conditions. We’re also heading into the high time for recreational use. (More teens try marijuana during the summer than any other season, according to a 2004 study.)

(MORE: 10 Amazing Uses for Marijuana)

The newest edible on the market: MagicalButter’s marijuana food truck. The Seattle-based company makes “botanical extractors” for your kitchen, or appliances that pull the active ingredients out of the plants of your choice (usually cannabis) to create oils and sauces. MagicalButter partnered with another company to create, The Samich, a marijuana-infused food truck.

On the menu, The Samich has pulled pork sandwiches, peanut butter and jelly and grilled cheese with tomato soup, each made with butter, oil or cheese infused with THC, the active ingredient in marijuana.

The truck made headlines when it debuted at Denver’s Cannabis Cup, a sort of marijuana trade show. This debut was mostly a marketing ploy, however. Pot is legal for recreational use in Denver, but it’s also highly regulated by the state and can’t be sold out of a privately owned food truck.

(MORE: 15 Shocking Facts You Don’t Know About Weed)

“In Seattle, we have caregivers,” MagicalButter CEO Garyn Angel told weather.com. “So we can actually have our caregivers give it to their patients, which is how we’re going to do it to begin with.” The truck has only been around since April, so they’re still ironing things out with state and city regulators.

Angel also wants to conduct “dispensary tours,” where the food truck’s chefs “teach the patients at dispensaries how to cook incredible meals with cannabis to treat their ailments.” (Now, the company posts THC-infused recipes on its website.)

“[The food truck] gives a good platform to educate people about how to eat with cannabis, finding out what works, what might not work,” Angel told NPR’s The Salt. “It’s a non-threatening way for people to discover if it helps them at all.”

MORE ON WEATHER.COM: Marijuana and More Healing Plants from Around the World

1 / 22

Pacific yew (West Coast of North America): The active ingredient in yew bark fights cancer by stopping tumors from forming. (New York Botanical Garden)


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May 16, 2014
Kim Rivers

There’s a Food Truck That Hawks Legal Cannabis-Laced Edibles

“…safer, saner, regularized products.”

No, no, no. It is much better to have face eating bath salt
zombies and Bubba cooking up meth in his trailer. Otherwise how can
you justify a Judge Dredd system for keeping the proles in line?
Drug warriors truly are evil people.

An acquaintance of mine was in the drug scene back before the
war on drugs got cranked up. She said it was cool, lots of nice
people and relatively safe drugs. She got out when the WOD got
started because she said “it turned violent and ugly, real
fast”.

Thanks SoCons.

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May 16, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Spotlight: Bam Bam Mexican Asian Fusion

Fans of fusion cuisine need look no further than the big, red Bam Bam food truck.

The mobile eatery blends Mexican and Asian influences to create dishes that are hard to find elsewhere in Tucson.

Its menu includes Korean tacos, burritos and kimchi quesadillas. There’s a Bam Bam Burger with barbecue beef, different cheeses, fresh pineapple, salsa and Sriracha, as well as a Kamikaze Dog, that comes with bacon, grilled onions, Sriracha and kimchi.

The fusion foods have led to a huge following for Bam Bam.

“We have customers who order the same thing every time,” said Fernando Sanchez, who owns the truck with his wife, Gabby. “But we also have customers who want to try something different and new every time.”

Fernando and Gabby are no strangers to Asian fusion. They were originally part-owners in the MaFooCo Mexican-Asian food truck, which ran in Tucson for a year-and-a-half.

When MaFooCo’s partners opted to dissolve the business, Fernando decided to keep the concept going.

He saw growing potential. His inspiration was Roy Choi, who rose to fame in the Los Angeles food world as the creator of his Korean taco food truck, Kogi.

Bam Bam, which uses the same truck that housed MaFooCo, has been on the road for about six months.

Fernando said the current menu features some of the MaFooCo favorites. Fernando has increased its offerings and he is always rotating in new dishes.

“We don’t want people to get bored,” he said.

Follow the Bam Bam food truck at facebook.com/bambamtruck online.

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May 16, 2014
Kim Rivers

Curiocity: Food Truck Feature — Butcher Salt

Food Trucks

Foxy Falafel

Foxy

Nate Dogs

Nate

Simply Steves

Steves

Hola Arepa

Hola

SushiFix

Sushifix

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

With so many new — and delicious — food trucks hitting the streets of the Twin Cities each summer, it’s almost too tough to keep up. Well, fear not, we’re here to help. Here’s this week’s food truck feature!

Jean Hutar says she was “destined to live the restaurant life.” Her family helped start her passion early on at their locally owned restaurant, where she quickly graduated from hostess to breakfast line cook — the place she honed the skills she still utilizes today.

As owner of the new food truck Butcher Salt, Hutar opted to leave the safe and secure behind to finally do what she loved — and so far, it’s been more than she ever dreamed it could be.

“I love getting up every day and going to work,” she said. “I don’t care if my alarm goes off at 4 o’clock in the morning. It’s like, ‘Yes! I get to run my food truck today.’ It’s a beautiful thing.”

She’s taking the food she loved growing up and putting a twist on it, hoping to spread her passion for food to anyone who visits. Every ounce of Butcher Salt has a story — from the color of the truck to the menu items she serves. And if you stop by, you’ll find Hutar with a big smile and bubbly personality, ready to tell you all about it.

With that, let’s meet Butcher Salt.

——-

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

Butcher Salt
Find them at @ButcherSalt, Butcher Salt Food Truck on Facebook and ButcherSalt.com.

Owner: Jean Hutar

Date the food truck opened: Feb. 12

What kind of food do you serve? I would say it’s American cuisine. I’ve worked in restaurants my whole life — I started as a line cook. It’s all of my favorites from growing up. It’s the stuffed hashbrowns, the sliders, the fun hot dogs — instead of just ketchup and mustard, now it’s sauteed peppers and onions and pepperjack cheese. It’s putting a twist on things I’ve been eating my whole life.

Price range of menu: From about $5-$9.

Hours of operation: Check their website, twitter or Facebook page for schedules (see above). But typically, they serve lunch, plus a few brewery events and more.

You say you were destined to go into the food industry. Tell us a little about your history in the biz. My parents owned a couple of restaurants as I was growing up. The first one, I was in elementary school in Eveleth. And then they bought Vertin’s in Ely. So I worked there all the way from seventh grade to my second year of junior college. And then when I went to college, I went for sports management at the University of Wisconsin-La Crosse and instead of working at YMCAs and Boys and Girls Clubs, I worked at restaurants. … If you had a cooking job and you’re in college, you probably got to eat for free so that kind of worked out really well. I was applying for Boys and Girls Clubs and YMCAs and I saw an ad for Chipotle and I thought it was really creative and witty and I’m like, they’ve got great benefits. I applied to one restaurant place and I got hired. I had no idea it was going to be a career — but it was like 10 years that I spent there. It was beautiful and fun but I thought, why not open up my own (place)?

What was your motivation to do a food truck? My motivation was, I guess, just the culture is so fun down here. I was thinking of doing like a breakfast joint, a brick-and-mortar, and then I thought, well, that’s not really realistic. The food truck scene is just so much fun and the experiences I’ve had with everybody from MidNord Empanada and Hibachi and Hola Arepa, just everybody down here. They’re just so fun. It fits my personality. I felt like I’d fit right in and I did.

How is the food prepared? I would say like, 90 percent of it is made-to-order. The creme brule we make beforehand and the caramels, as well. But otherwise we’re cooking to order.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

How did you come up with the name? Interesting. I think I built my food truck backwards so the name was one of the last things, the outside of the truck is one of the last things. The interior was almost done before I had the exterior planned. We went through a bunch of random names, like Bad Habit, Gotta Have It and my last name is Hutar and my nickname is Hootie and everyone was like, “Hootie’s!” And I was like, no. We went through the process of just looking at places so we went to like, Crate and Barrel and just looked at names of utensils and I thought about my favorite utensils to use. And there was this box of Butcher Salt, which has rosemary, sage, thyme and marjoram infused with sea salt. I bought it, made hashbrowns with it, made a burger with it and I was hooked. And I was like, can we do Butcher Salt as a name because this is just my new favorite seasoning. And the answer is, yes. So we had to go through this whole thing of how do we make a logo for Butcher Salt where your first thing isn’t like, meat, cleaver, a butcher shop. So that’s where we went with the cutting board with the knife on it and sea salt, plus herbs. When you see the truck, “Inspired Street Eats” is right at the top.

What’s your best dish that you serve? Or what’s the most popular? That’s kind of like asking who my favorite kid is. I would say the most popular dish is probably the sliders. The sliders and Rangers or the Butcher Salted Browns. But Caprese is coming in. Stuffed Hashbrowns have surprised me — they’ve just like taken off. It’s this huge meal of hashbrowns with sauteed peppers, onions, bacon, more hashbrowns, pepperjack cheese, more of that stuff and then this fried egg, so it’s a healthy, healthy portion of hashbrowns. I love how much the public has enjoyed them because they’re a lot of fun to make and I grew up making them as a line cook.

(credit: CBS)

(credit: CBS)

Describe your truck in one word: Passion.

Have you had any crazy stories from working inside a food truck yet? No crazy stories yet but I’m sure that they’ll be some. Two stories come to mind — the first, we were working at the Crashed Ice event in St. Paul with the Heavy Metal food truck — the Motley Crews guys are awesome — and it was bitter cold. And here, one of my employees and I are standing in here, freezing cold, we can see our breath and they’re over there, they have the window on, they have lawn chairs in there. And I’m like, ‘I didn’t even know you could do that.’ And they were like, ‘OK Jean, this is what you have to do. Come over and warm up and then we’ll show you how to put a window on.’ That was the last day we froze our butts off.

The other one, the thing I was most nervous about was parallel parking. So I have front and rear cameras on this thing. And the first time we went out, we were in St. Paul. We found a spot … I’m a really good parallel parker, I’d like to say, in a normal car … so two turns and we’re in the spot, perfectly. And then I opened the door and the window was on the wrong side of the road and I was on a one way.

What’s one thing you want people to know about this food truck? That it’s delicious and made with love. I own this. I’m not working for anybody else and I have my friends on it. I don’t want to start a restaurant in the future, I’d love to have a few more trucks and spread them around the country or Minnesota. But it’s just a beautiful place to be. I want everyone to walk away with a smile on their face and happy taste buds. And happy to go tell their friends about Butcher Salt.

Catch the Food Truck Feature every week, in the Curiocity column. Know of a food truck you think should be featured? Let us know by leaving a comment below or tweeting your suggestion to @SaraPelissero!

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May 15, 2014
Kim Rivers

New food truck to plant seed for healthy, mobile eating

On a recent sunny afternoon, a happy couple stood posing by the Silver Seed food truck. Yet to open for business, Fort Collins’ newest mobile restaurant was parked among potted plants outside Bath Garden Center, while the couple had their picture taken in front of it. The buffed aluminum siding of the 1964 Serro Scotty Sportsman shone for the occasion of their 40th wedding anniversary.

Nearby, the food truck’s owners, themselves yet-to-be married, stood watching. Taylor Smith turned to his fiancee and asked if there shouldn’t be more wood trim, and Melanie Boyna responded — Why not wainscoting?

Still a few weeks out from opening, the young couple wanted to hammer out any final touches on their tiny but spacious restaurant, before starting to serve fresh food from behind the Scotty’s sliding window.

Just a few months earlier, in January, Smith and Boyna moved from Chicago, where they worked in the restaurant industry for years. Even before finding their namesake trailer, the two moved to Fort Collins, where they had decided to open their own business.

“A million dollar restaurant was just out of our grasp,” said Smith, who recognized that Chicago, considered one of the country’s premiere restaurant capitals, wasn’t really the place to drive a food truck.

Fort Collins, he said, with its “rise in CSAs, really close-knit community of foodies and huge ag(riculture) scene,” was a better community to plant their seed.

“We’re trying to source as many things as we can from here,” Smith said.

He and Boyna have already bought into a few local CSAs, and starting May 24, they plan on packing the Scotty daily with fresh produce and a handful of constantly changing menu items made from it.

They said their goal is to change the way restaurants do business with distributors.

“We want to re-establish the connection between farmers and restaurants,” Smith said. “We won’t have the same offerings year-round … but we will keep that trust (with our customers).”

That trust he mentioned will start with the quality of the food, and the freshness of the ingredients. Smith and Boyna won’t be using butter or oils, or even a fryer, for that matter.

“It’ll all be really fresh, crisp, delicious stuff,” Smith said — salads and wraps in the summer, soups made from frozen produce by winter.

And, “we’ll have coffee and around eight to nine juices and smoothies for people on the run,” he added.

For people interested in planting their own garden, the couple will sell seeds from Happy Heart Farm, where they’ll be parked during CSA pickup days during the summer.

“What we’re trying to do is also open up people to the idea of the CSA,” Smith said. “We want to help people take the next step in this food movement.”

The Silver Seed

What? locally-sourced, fresh produce food truck

When? Starting May 24

Where? Bath Garden Center, 2000 E. Prospect Road (and more locations to follow)

www.thesilverseed.com

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May 15, 2014
Kim Rivers

Troy Food Truck Festival postponed because of weather

TROY The Food Truck Festival, originally scheduled for Friday, May 16 at Riverfront Park, has been postponed indefinitely due to the bad weather anticipated for Friday.

Townsquare Media has informed the city that they are hopeful to reschedule the event in late July or August.

In addition to the food trucks and vendors, the festival had booked three live bands including Wild Adriatic, Connor Kennedy and Paranoid Social Club.

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May 15, 2014
Kim Rivers

Meet Neato’s food truck’s Neal Lenzmeier (yes, the duck-fat-fries guy)

Occupation: Owner/operator of Neato’s food truck

Editor’s note: Lunch by the River, a food-truck court on Kellogg Boulevard near the intersection with Robert Street in downtown St. Paul, resumes Thursday. Neato’s food truck is joined by Cafe Racer, A Cupcake Social and Home Street Home. There is live acoustic music and plenty of room to picnic in the park.

Age: 32

When you were young, what did you want to be when you grew up? Any little-boy pipe dream — football player, paleontologist. Every year, it changed.

What’s your first food memory? Eating artichokes. I was in love with artichokes when I was 3 and 4. Then I took about a 15-year break from eating them. My parents would tell me when I got picky that when I was younger, I used to love artichokes. My daughter is the same way. She’s 4 and in that picky stage and she won’t eat even a hamburger. That hurts.

What was your first job in food? I worked for my dad, who was a chef for a catering company. It was in 1994. I was a dishwasher and then a prep cook. He owned a catering company that did rock shows, music shows. I got to meet a few celebrities, which was pretty cool as a teenager. I met Tom Morello of Rage Against the Machine and Gwen Stefani. Those are the two I remember most.

How did you wind up in the food truck business? I got a taste of running my own business in 2005-06. I moved to Tonga, a little island kingdom in the South Pacific, near Fiji and Samoa, and opened a movie theater in a hotel. While we were there, we researched opening a take-away business. So when I came back here, I tried to figure out how I could do that. The food truck was an affordable way to carry out the same concept.

How did you decide to make duck-fat fries? We were testing the menu. Peanut oil was just boring, and we figured animal fat was what they served in all the original drive-in restaurants. Since that’s the concept we were going for, we looked at beef tallow, leaf lard (lard that surrounds a pig’s organs) and then discovered duck fat, which tasted the best and was the most widely available. We do have to explain it to a lot of people. Most of them try it and very few of them are like, “Oooh, that’s gross.” The majority of people get what it is. Still, we’ve catered bar mitzvahs where the parents say, “Maybe don’t tell them it’s duck fat.”

What’s your favorite dish on the menu? The jalapeno popper burger. I like the creaminess of the cream cheese mixed with a little spice and the sweetness of the preserve. It’s just a really good balance.

What’s something few people know about you? I’d say my history in Tonga. My wife and I opened a movie theater in a hotel conference room. It was very makeshift. We had these huge foam couches that we pieced together, and it was super comfortable. We could serve beer, too. My wife and I wanted to buy a business somewhere tropical, and that’s how we ended up there. Tonga is the least expensive because you can’t buy land there. You lease it from the government or families. So businesses are much cheaper to own there. It’s a very eco-friendly destination. Big in the yachting and sailing community.

Why did you come back? The business aspect of it didn’t work. Tonga seemed more like a good place to retire, not to start a life. We were 25 years old and living in a place with hardly any good food, no good beer, little culture or art or anything like that. I also owe a video-rental place there about $700. This lady was hunting me down the day we were leaving the island. They were just knockoff burned DVDs, too.

What’s your favorite restaurant? Here, 112 Eatery in Minneapolis. I’ve been there on romantic dates, with big groups, family gatherings — it’s always really good.

If someone were to play you in a movie, who should it be? Let’s go with Seth Rogen. We’re on the same level of physical fitness.

What’s next? Keep plugging away with the truck. I hope to expand, but I also like spending time with our two kids. I’m a stay-at-home dad in the winter, and it’s the hardest job I’ve ever had.

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