Browsing articles in "street food"
Oct 30, 2014
Tim Lester

Street food: Lucinda O’Sullivan at Siri, K Chido Mexico and My Meat Wagon

Street food is hot, hot, hot right now and it’s popping up in various spots all over the capital.

Lucinda O’Sullivan

Published 27/10/2014 | 02:30

Street food in Dublin

It’s easy to understand the universal appeal of street food. It’s a no-brainer – tasty, immediate, fresh and good value. You will note I omit the nasty words ‘fast’ and ‘cheap’ – that is a different sector! Street food has also become a way for people to set up in business, starting simply with a stall, a van or a modest premises. Indeed, many experienced people are doing so.

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Siri, facing Christ Church Cathedral, is such a case. It has just been opened by Jayraj Poojary and Kuldip Kumar, both of whom worked for a high-end Indian restaurant group here for many years. With them, they have Chef Rajeev Kalhotra, who has worked in the five-star Oberoi hotels in India. The premises are simple, the food is delicious and the prices are great.

You can either take your food out, or perch on a stool and chomp away from your snack box, as they do in Mumbai. There are three menus: in-house, take-away and a lunch box. The in-house menu (€7.50-€14.95) sports dishes such as prawn Molly, a South Indian dish of tiger prawns in a smooth coconut sauce; Punjabi lamb curry; aromatic biryanis or a wonderful thali selection of curries, plus specialities from their tandoor oven. The take-away menu (€3.50-€12.95) has all your favourite Indian dishes, while their lunch boxes at €5-€6 will brighten up your workplace.

I had a Udipi prawn box (€9.95) with gorgeous prawn ‘lollipops’ coated with very fine crispy potato strings, served with Goan sauce, rice and naan bread. A tandoori chicken tikka box (€8.75) was also ace, with spiced chicken breast served with paratha and mint chutney.

If you fancy Mexican food, take a wander down to K Chido, located at the back of the Four Courts, where you can’t miss the colourful wall-art on the front of a warehouse. A big pink-and-blue van is parked inside, from which they serve breakfast burritos, fajitas, tacos and quesadillas. The combinations include everything from pulled pork to chorizo, to re-fried beans and plenty of jalapenos – all around €4.50-€6. You can do take-out, or park yourself on the knocked-together, brightly painted wooden seating under the gaze of old Mexican photos. I had a delicious quesadilla filled with courgette, cheese and chillies (€4.50) – hot, hot, hot – while my friend had a toasted fajita with beef, cheese, onions, peppers and salad (€6). Now, was that really a senior counsel I saw in a corner, with a vast burrito between his chops?

Another ‘in-house van’ is My Meat Wagon in Smithfield. You don’t have to sport a beard or wear a beanie to enjoy it, but, if you do, I’d say you’d be in hipster heaven. Again, it’s a van with a boarded-up facade but, for all its laid-back, American hillbilly look, a lot of effort has gone into making this place comfortable as well as cool.

Grub-wise, it’s all about barbecued meat – cow, pig and bird with slaw, corn, fries, mash, beans and sausage. It was lunchtime; options included ‘meat in bread’ or ‘meat in a box’, with two sides and a drink – which was served in jam-jars – at €12 to sit in, or €10 to take out. Sides are a hefty €3.95. We shared ‘meat on a board’ at €14.95 with pulled pork, brisket, two chicken pieces, red slaw and fries – served in a mini shopping-trolley, natch!

Watching the ‘suits and beards’ chomp away, all I could think was that this was an update on the mammy dinner of meat and two veg – and probably more expensive than the auld lunchtime pub carvery. I guess it’s a bit like a Mickey D’s for big boys – there are even toy-animal table markers!

Siri

9A, Lord Edward Street,

Dublin 2

Tel: (01) 672-8080

siri.ie

 

K Chido

Chancery Street,

Dublin 7

Tel: (086) 353-4369

kchidomexico.com

 

My Meat Wagon

Market Square,

Smithfield,

Dublin 7

Tel: (01) 874-8172

mymeatwagon.ie

 

Street Treats – Three to Try

Food Fiesta

69A Johnstown Grove, Dun Laoghaire, Dublin.

Tel: (087) 610-2414

foodfiesta.ie

Style

Jaime Jambrina’s Spanish food, which includes paella, gazpacho and croquetas, is available at Dun Laoghaire and Merrion Square food markets, and soon Jaime will be in permanent new premises in Blackrock. Catering, cooking workshops and an online food store

Price

Market food, €1-€10

Try

Bocata de chistorra – a large Basque sausage on a bread roll, €4

Wine

Soft drinks

 

Aroi

6/7 Carey’s Lane,

Cork.

Tel: (021) 427-2388

aroi.eu

Style

Having wowed Limerick with his great Asian street food, Eddie Ong Chok Fong has opened in Cork. Choices range from fish cakes to wok noodles, stir-fries to curries, grilled dishes to zesty salads

Price

Mains, €9-€10

Try

Som Tam – green papaya salad, with dried shrimp and cherry tomato, €9

Wine

From €19.50

 

Susi Foods

The Gallops,

Leopardstown,

Dublin 18

Tel: (087) 974-2019

Style

Susi is the Irish for sushi but Japanese chef, Yoshio Miyachi, also has many other authentic Japanese specialities in his repertoire. Available at Dun Laoghaire, Merrion Square, Stillorgan and Sandyford markets. Bento boxes for lunch and private catering

Price

Market food, €2-€7

Try

Yakisoba noodles with chicken

Wine

Soft drinks

 

lucindaosullivan.com

Sunday Independent

Recommended Reading

Oct 30, 2014
Tim Lester

‘Food Truck Finale’ at Huntsville’s Straight to Ale promises shorter lines … – Press-Register

(Courtesy Downtown Huntsville Inc.)

HUNTSVILLE, Alabama - If you were turned off by the long lines at Huntsville’s wildly popular monthly food truck gatherings, Chad Emerson has a deal for you.

Emerson, CEO of Downtown Huntsville Inc., on Wednesday announced a ticketed food truck event next month at Straight to Ale Brewery that will be limited to 250 people.

The Nov. 13 “Food Truck Finale” will serve as both the year’s final mass gathering of mobile vendors and a fundraiser to help with the cost of putting on more food truck rallies in 2015.

“There are some charges involved such as bands and restrooms, and we wanted to find a way to recoup some of that,” Emerson told AL.com. “All of the proceeds from the Food Truck Finale will be reinvested in the 2015 street food season.”

Tickets are $15 and can be purchased at foodtruckfinale.brownpapertickets.com while supplies last.

Emerson said attendees will enjoy free samples from a dozen food trucks – Badd Newz BBQ, Café on Wheels, Earth and Stone Wood Fired Pizza, Fire Spice, Food Fighters Bustaurant, Honeypie Bakery, I Love Bacon, Mason Dixon Bakery, Neon Lilly, Piper Leaf, Sugar Belle and Sub Zero Ice Cream Yogurt – plus live music by Flannel Umbros.

If you’re still hungry after the samples, all the trucks will be selling food. You can also buy beer from the Straight to Ale tap room, including a special Street Food Brew being made just for this event.

The unique fundraiser will generate $3,750 for Downtown Huntsville Inc. if all 250 tickets are sold.

“It will allow us to have even more live entertainment next year, more restrooms – all of those things which people say are important,” said Emerson.

Recommended Reading

Oct 30, 2014
Tim Lester

Real street food – No 3: Com Tam, broken rice from Ho Chi Minh City

What’s the dish?

Com Tam, aka Broken Rice – it’s essentially broken grains of rice left over from the traditional drying and milling process. It looks very similar to normal rice, only the grains are broken into smaller pieces, hence the name.

Where does it come from?

Basically, it’s hard to sell due to its imperfections. The grains were usually ground up for rice flour or animal feed, or eaten by the farmers themselves; however, the Saigonese have made an art-form of this rice and use it as a platform for all sorts of combinations.

What does it taste like?

Broken rice itself tastes like normal rice, and has a similar texture, it is just smaller – the taste depends on how you serve it.

How is it served?

A plate of com tam comes with a plethora of ingredients placed on top, such as suon nuong (marinated grilled pork chops), bi (shredded pork skin), cha trung (a steamed pork and egg quiche), cha ca (deep fried fish patty) and trung (fried egg). It is usually garnished with some lightly fried, sliced spring onions or some zingy accompaniments typical of Vietnamese cooking: mint, spring onions and lime, for instance.

Anything extra?

On the side you can have pickled vegetables or sliced cucumber and tomato. A dipping sauce of fish sauce, lime and chilli can be served.

Why should someone try it?

Street food in Saigon is slow food served fast and com tam is no different. Even though each ingredient on the plate can take up to 2-3 hours to prepare, when the order is up, it takes no more than a minute to get to your table. It’s also very tasty and the marinade that goes on the pork chop is full of umami.

What’s the bill?

A plate can cost from 20,000 VND (about 56p) to 60,000 VND (£1.50) depending on whether you buy it from a street vendor or a cafe.

Where can you get it?

Every neighbourhood in Ho Chi Minh has a stall, easily identifiable by their ‘Com Tam’ sign. It is served morning, noon and night. If you do manage to find it outside the city, it will be called Com Tam Saigon, as it is considered a Ho Chi Minh City dish.

Can you make it at home?

Yes, if you live in Ho Chi Minh City. But actually, broken rice isn’t usually exported.

What does this dish say about Ho Chi Minh City?

As Ho Chi Minh is the economic centre of Vietnam, the Saigonese are constantly on the go and need something fast and filling to get through the day – I suppose broken rice reflects that lifestyle.

Recommended Reading

Oct 29, 2014
Tim Lester

Street food’s got these meals in a pocket

Empanadas, samosas and pupusas are celebrated street foods that fit in the hand, but unlike their manufactured, frozen American cousin, these hot pockets utilize fresh ingredients. If you want a handmade lunch for less than $5, it’s entirely possible when you add ethnic fare into the mix.

Empanadas at La Cucharita

The fried pies of the Deep South look nearly identical to Latin American empanadas.

I especially like Colombian empanadas and La Cucharita, a small Mom and Pop Colombian cafe on North Pleasantburg, offers five different fried empanadas for just $1.25 each.

The beef and chicken empanadas are mixed with rice seasoned with onion and finely chopped cilantro. Ham and cheese empanadas are served with pineapple jam and the guava and cheese empanada features a fruit paste that is pitch perfect against a melted mozzarella-like cheese.

The real magic of these empanadas is the crust. La Cucharita uses a dough blend of flour, corn and potato and fries them to order in olive oil creating glistening golden bubbles across its surface.

Manager Jose Feliciano says people call in to order three to six empanadas at a time for take out, though they are also popular as an appetizer in the restaurant. Ham and cheese is their best seller (it’s my kids favorite and the greatest $1.25 meal I can buy them), but Feliciano personally favors the guava and cheese. “The cheese keeps the moisture inside and I think it’s perfect,” he says.

Samosas at The Drop In Store

North Mainers have been eating samosas from the Drop In Store for decades– even before Maria Gomes revived the bodega kitchen at the back of the store about a year ago. Gomes is from Goa, India whose cuisine is heavily influenced by the Portuguese from which her family is descended.

Goan samosas are less tetrahedral shaped than samosas made in Northern India and are not served with condiments. They are a street snack, one that Gomes missed when she moved to Greenville with her husband, Roland, but the accomplished cook did not know how to make them.

“They are everywhere in Goa,” she says. “My mother didn’t make samosas because they were on carts on every street, so I taught myself how to make them until they tasted right.”

She makes the dough from scratch every other day. Her vegetarian samosa is filled with potato, peas, carrots and spices including the curry blend garam masala, coriander, cumin and ginger. Her beef samosa is seasoned with clove and cinnamon and just a bit of the potato mix, which helps it come together.

Samosas at The Drop In Store are priced at just $1.52 each, though Gomes acknowledges she could sell them for more. “I think it’s the right price,” she explains. “I want someone to be able to get a snack that I made, something really good, that’s not too expensive.”

Pupusas at Pupuseria Mister

In the middle of the Mister Supermarket in Berea is a grill that specializes in a Salvadoran obsession, pupusas.

Handmade corn cakes are stuffed with cheese and cooked on a griddle to create a pupusa. They are traditionally topped with a vinegar-based cabbage slaw offered tableside in big glass jars.

Pupusas are addictively delicious, especially while still hot. They come with two pepper sauces, one more salsa-like and one with a solid kick. Pupuseria Mister offers five variations on the traditional cheese pupusa adding beans, chicken, pork or the edible flower of a Latin American vine named Loroco. The buds look a bit like an asparagus tip but taste more like mild artichoke.

The pupusas are $4 each and one is enough for a filling lunch though it is fun to go with a friend and try the different combinations. And, though the kitchen is named Mister, the talent behind the counter is decidedly female. Carmen Moz is head chef and owner of the bodega and is happy to share her love of Latin food, when she’s not too busy.

Sidebar:

Want To Go?

For empanadas…

La Cucharita

1170 N Pleasantburg Dr

For samosas…

The Drop In Store

709 North Main St

For pupusas…

Mister Supermarket

1129 Cedar Lane Rd

Recommended Reading

Oct 29, 2014
Tim Lester

Tazé Mediterranean Street Food to Open at the Mercantile Exchange

tazeexterior.jpgThe future Tazé Mediterranean Street Food at the MX. | Google Street View

Tazé Mediterranean Street Food is the latest restaurant to join the Mercantile Exchange Building (a.k.a. the MX) downtown at 626 Washington Avenue. The fast-casual restaurant will focus on housemade Mediterranean delicacies from owners Justin and Casey Roth and chef Matt Borchardt.

See also: First Look: Downtown’s MX Movies Makes Dinner and a Movie Way Too Easy

“Tazé will offer fresh, healthy, daily-prepared cuisine using traditional Mediterranean cooking methods,” Justin Roth said in a statement. “Customers will be greeted by the inviting aromas of the Mediterranean, homemade pita bread, an array of Mediterranean-inspired sides, sauces and toppings.”

There will be a build-your-own-entree option and plenty of offerings for vegetarian and vegan diners. Tazé will serve lunch and dinner, with small plates and beer and wine specials for happy hour. “Our primary goal is to offer St. Louis a new and healthy alternative,” Borchardt said in a statement. “The menu will utilize as many fresh, local ingredients as possible, while sourcing antibiotic-free proteins and imported spices from around the globe.”

The 3,400-square-foot space at the MX is designed by SPACE Architecture + Design, which you may recognize from Mission Taco Joint, the Good Pie and other restaurants around town. SPACE’s Tom Niemeier described the future Tazé space as cozy but contemporary and filled with natural wood and “saffron-inspired colors.” The MX development also houses Pi Pizzeria, Robust, Snarf’s and Takaya New Asian.

The Roths hope to eventually open several locations throughout St. Louis and even expand to other cities. There’s no menu just yet — Justin Roth and Borchardt left Monday for a thirteen-day trip to eight different countries for research and menu development. So far there have been stops in places like Madrid and Marrakech. You can follow the trip on Twitter and Instagram at @tazestreetfood.

Preparing traditional Moroccan tangine in the kitchen, hands on with local chefs. #Marrakech #tazestreetfood #delicious

A photo posted by Taze Mediterranean Street Food (@tazestreetfood) on Oct 10, 2014 at 12:33pm PDT

Location Info

The MX District

700 Washington Avenue, St. Louis, MO

Category: General

Recommended Reading

Oct 28, 2014
Tim Lester

Brick + Wood Prepares to Open their Wood-fired Pizza and Neapolitan Street …

30 Wines on Tap, A Lively Social Scene and a Place for the Whole Family

Paolo and Clara Cavalli are preparing to open Brick + Wood starting with a soft opening November 1st. An exciting new concept to an often played out Italian restaurant genre, Brick + Wood is the product of Paolo’s childhood in Italy and growing up in the family’s restaurant business here in Fairfield County; a true representation of his culinary prowess and Italian heritage.

Paolo spent much of his childhood outside of Rome on a farm which bore an olive grove and vineyard. Here, he learned the language and developed a passion for the Italian food culture. In the states he immersed himself in the family’s restaurant business (Luigi’s in 1975 and Ponte Vecchio in 2003 in Fairfield). Upon graduating college with an engineering degree, Paolo took a ten-year reprieve from the restaurant world and took a position with GE Capital in Irving, TX. Clara, who also grew up in an Italian household, comes from a line of 6 generations of bread makers.

Not exactly known for their pizza in the Lone Star State, the pizza oven began calling their names and in 2008 Paolo and Clara created Cavalli Pizzeria Napoletana in Irving, TX. Upon the success of their first restaurant the duo opened a sister location in McKinney, TX. Today, both restaurants continue to thrive while the Cavalli’s embark on a new venture back at home with their families in Connecticut.

Brick + Wood is located in the former Ponte Vecchio location in the Brick Walk locale of Fairfield. The space and the concept embrace a new beginning and dining out for a new generation. Developed by Haverson Architecture Design of Greenwich, CT, the restaurant has been transformed into a multi-layered / multi-sensory restaurant and bar.

As the name implies, much of the design is framed by stressed wood and worn Chicago brick with pockets of space throughout filled with stacks of wood that heat the oven. The mosaic tiled pizza oven and the butcher block and Calcutta Ciero marble top mozzarella bar are the focal point of the dining room. Brick + Wood is home to the area’s first all-tap wine bar, accentuated by a steel backdrop and wooden taps. The indoor-outdoor component flows seamlessly from the bar onto the large patio highlighted by outdoor lamps draped across the open archways and exterior spaces, reminiscent of a Naples street scene. 

Equally evocative of the Italian street scene is Brick + Wood’s inspired menu. The dining experience begins with a real Mozzarella Bar where hand-pulled mozzarella is prepared throughout the day. This wonderfully fresh and milky cheese is presented in a variety of flavorful incarnations, including mozzarella rollatini and burrata with truffle. Imported dried and cured meats such as capocollo, mortadella, prosciutto and salami are thinly sliced to order.

The Italian street food component is an exciting new food concept for Fairfield County. These traditional finger foods are what one might see people eating out of a paper cone or wrapped in parchment while strolling in the streets or piazzas. Some of the Cavallis’ favorites that will be featured on the menu include; Arancini – deep fried risotto balls stuffed with a variety of fillings; Potato Crocchette; Fried Calamari; Stuffed Calzone; and a selection of toasted panini and fresh salads. The sweet side of the menu features dessert pizza with Nutella, homemade seasonal tiramisu and flash fried zeppole.

Brick + Wood continues to shine with their wood-fired thin crust pizza. Their “perfect pizza” is a labor of love and is certified by the Associazone Pizzaiuoli Napoletani (APN), an association formed in Naples by pizza makers to preserve the authentic Neapolitan pizza values. Supported by the Italian government, this rigorous certification process is required by any restaurant in Italy wishing to serve authentic Neapolitan pizza. Only a handful of pizzaiolos in the United States have earned this distinction. Brick + Wood pizza starts with fresh dough, handmade on the premises and leavened for 24-48 hours. The dough is hand toss, never rolled, to give it that thin delicate center.  Using Italian imported San Marzano tomatoes, fresh basil and house made fior di latte mozzarella; the pizza is then cooked in a 900 degree wood-fired oven for about 90 seconds, which marks the pizza with flame blackened blisters along the crust and bottom. From this perfect “anatomy of a pizza”, creative, as well as classic toppings can be added.

The beverage program is a first of its kind in the area. In addition to craft cocktails and premium beer selections, an impressive line-up of wine varietals is served by the glass, as a 2 oz taste, 1?2 carafe or full carafe, via a contemporary wine tap design which maintains the integrity of wine. Gone are the open bottles left to turn while sitting on the shelf or to be lost in the back of the fridge. Brick + Wood has researched, sipped and sourced the best wines from around the

 world from winemakers who want their varietals to continuously shine from start to finish. These wines are stored in stainless steel kegs and maintained at optimal temperature – reds at 62 degrees and whites at 42 degrees. In a properly sealed keg where the wine is not exposed to oxygen, even when tapped repeatedly, the last ounce of wine tastes as fresh as the first.

Brick + Wood  is a fresh new outlook for how we drink – and eat.

www.lovelifeandpizza.com

203-939-1400

1275 Post Rd No. 7 / Fairfield, CT 06824

Recommended Reading

Oct 28, 2014
Tim Lester

Casual dining is elevated at Fulton Street Food Hall

Steve Marcus

Emily Moheganrooney helps Caesars Entertainment PR intern Sha’Mell Henry with a sandwich order at Fulton Street Food Hall on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, at Harrah’s.

Monday, Oct. 27, 2014 | 2 a.m.

Fulton Street Food Hall at Harrah’s

Launch slideshow »

A baker holds a cinnamon roll with cream cheese frosting at Fulton Street Food Hall on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, at Harrah’s.

“Try the cinnamon roll.”

That was the suggestion from multiple people during Wednesday morning’s tour of Fulton Street Food Hall, which opened about one month ago across from check-in at Harrah’s Las Vegas.

It was a delicious suggestion, and now the cinnamon roll (light — not dense — and perfectly sweet), and Fulton Street Food Hall are two more reasons to make your way to the under-the-radar Harrah’s, joining “Million Dollar Quartet,” Mac King, chef Kerry Simon’s KGB Burger, the Improv, Ruth’s Chris (now that the Paradise location is closed) and Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar Grill.

Harrah’s Food Beverage Director Bradley Bittermann and Fulton Street General Manager Markos Mendoza, previously at Ruth’s Chris and Bacchanal Buffet at Caesars Palace, led the tour of Fulton Street — think Whole Foods (except you won’t spend your whole paycheck) and a really elevated food court that’s warm, inviting and bursting with options.

The former space of Ming’s and the 24-hour cafe features sit-down breakfast from 6 to 11 a.m. (other sections are open 24/7); late-night pizza until 3 a.m.; gourmet pizzas; soup station (the Greek lemon yogurt with tofu cheese soup was inventive and bursting with flavor); create-your-own salad bar; a gorgeous and colorful sandwich station with eight bread selections; sushi bar; and noodle bar with ramen and udon.

Mendoza’s team at Fulton Street Food Hall includes chefs John Witte, Antonio Velasquez, Brenda Dolan and Victor Low, while David DeLeo oversees the adjoining, and nonsmoking, bar.

“Everything is fresh and consistent and made in-house every single day,” Witte said. Sampled and tasty: Pastries (the black and white cookie was divine, the cannoli crunchy, as it should be); eggs Benedict with prosciutto; Greek lemon yogurt soup; crispy noodles with shrimp and bok choy; and ramen.

Now please pass another cinnamon roll.

Don Chareunsy is senior editor for arts and entertainment of the Las Vegas Sun.

Robin Leach has been a journalist for more than 50 years and has spent the past decade giving readers the inside scoop on Las Vegas, the world’s premier platinum playground.

Follow Sun AE Senior Editor Don Chareunsy on Twitter at Twitter.com/VDLXEditorDon.

Follow Robin Leach on Twitter at Twitter.com/Robin_Leach.

Follow Vegas DeLuxe on Twitter at Twitter.com/vegasdeluxe.

Harrah’s

Just as distinctive as it’s famous neighbors Caesar’s Palace and The Venetian, Harrah’s Las Vegas has been entertaining guests since 1973. The 87,700-square foot casino is filled with 1,520 slot machines and 107 gaming tables. Outside the casino, guests are able to experience fun in a street-fair atmosphere at the Carnival Court, an outdoor lounge with live entertainment (including the bartenders), food stands and outdoor shops.

At Harrah’s comedy is King, and that has never been more apparent then the comedy acts of Rita Rudner, the Mac King Comedy Magic Show and the Improv Comedy Club. After the show, guests are more than welcome to laugh at their friends at The Piano Bar, famous for its dueling pianos and karaoke. Most recently, Harrah’s added tribute show “Legends in Concert” to its list of entertainment.

Restaurants like Ming’s offers Asian cuisine, while Ruth’s Chris Steak House offers guests fine steaks and fresh seafood. Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar is a country-themed bar with a restaurant, live music and the occasional appearance from Keith himself.

702-369-5000

Recommended Reading

Oct 28, 2014
Tim Lester

Casual dining is elevated at Fulton Street Food Hall

Steve Marcus

Emily Moheganrooney helps Caesars Entertainment PR intern Sha’Mell Henry with a sandwich order at Fulton Street Food Hall on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, at Harrah’s.

Monday, Oct. 27, 2014 | 2 a.m.

Fulton Street Food Hall at Harrah’s

Launch slideshow »

A baker holds a cinnamon roll with cream cheese frosting at Fulton Street Food Hall on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, at Harrah’s.

“Try the cinnamon roll.”

That was the suggestion from multiple people during Wednesday morning’s tour of Fulton Street Food Hall, which opened about one month ago across from check-in at Harrah’s Las Vegas.

It was a delicious suggestion, and now the cinnamon roll (light — not dense — and perfectly sweet), and Fulton Street Food Hall are two more reasons to make your way to the under-the-radar Harrah’s, joining “Million Dollar Quartet,” Mac King, chef Kerry Simon’s KGB Burger, the Improv, Ruth’s Chris (now that the Paradise location is closed) and Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar Grill.

Harrah’s Food Beverage Director Bradley Bittermann and Fulton Street General Manager Markos Mendoza, previously at Ruth’s Chris and Bacchanal Buffet at Caesars Palace, led the tour of Fulton Street — think Whole Foods (except you won’t spend your whole paycheck) and a really elevated food court that’s warm, inviting and bursting with options.

The former space of Ming’s and the 24-hour cafe features sit-down breakfast from 6 to 11 a.m. (other sections are open 24/7); late-night pizza until 3 a.m.; gourmet pizzas; soup station (the Greek lemon yogurt with tofu cheese soup was inventive and bursting with flavor); create-your-own salad bar; a gorgeous and colorful sandwich station with eight bread selections; sushi bar; and noodle bar with ramen and udon.

Mendoza’s team at Fulton Street Food Hall includes chefs John Witte, Antonio Velasquez, Brenda Dolan and Victor Low, while David DeLeo oversees the adjoining, and nonsmoking, bar.

“Everything is fresh and consistent and made in-house every single day,” Witte said. Sampled and tasty: Pastries (the black and white cookie was divine, the cannoli crunchy, as it should be); eggs Benedict with prosciutto; Greek lemon yogurt soup; crispy noodles with shrimp and bok choy; and ramen.

Now please pass another cinnamon roll.

Don Chareunsy is senior editor for arts and entertainment of the Las Vegas Sun.

Robin Leach has been a journalist for more than 50 years and has spent the past decade giving readers the inside scoop on Las Vegas, the world’s premier platinum playground.

Follow Sun AE Senior Editor Don Chareunsy on Twitter at Twitter.com/VDLXEditorDon.

Follow Robin Leach on Twitter at Twitter.com/Robin_Leach.

Follow Vegas DeLuxe on Twitter at Twitter.com/vegasdeluxe.

Harrah’s

Just as distinctive as it’s famous neighbors Caesar’s Palace and The Venetian, Harrah’s Las Vegas has been entertaining guests since 1973. The 87,700-square foot casino is filled with 1,520 slot machines and 107 gaming tables. Outside the casino, guests are able to experience fun in a street-fair atmosphere at the Carnival Court, an outdoor lounge with live entertainment (including the bartenders), food stands and outdoor shops.

At Harrah’s comedy is King, and that has never been more apparent then the comedy acts of Rita Rudner, the Mac King Comedy Magic Show and the Improv Comedy Club. After the show, guests are more than welcome to laugh at their friends at The Piano Bar, famous for its dueling pianos and karaoke. Most recently, Harrah’s added tribute show “Legends in Concert” to its list of entertainment.

Restaurants like Ming’s offers Asian cuisine, while Ruth’s Chris Steak House offers guests fine steaks and fresh seafood. Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar is a country-themed bar with a restaurant, live music and the occasional appearance from Keith himself.

702-369-5000

Recommended Reading

Oct 27, 2014
Tim Lester

Fulton Street Food Hall is an elevated casual-dining experience

Steve Marcus

Emily Moheganrooney helps Caesars Entertainment PR intern Sha’Mell Henry with a sandwich order at Fulton Street Food Hall on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, at Harrah’s.

Monday, Oct. 27, 2014 | 2 a.m.

Fulton Street Food Hall at Harrah’s

Launch slideshow »

A baker holds a cinnamon roll with cream cheese frosting at Fulton Street Food Hall on Wednesday, Oct. 22, 2014, at Harrah’s.

“Try the cinnamon roll.”

That was the suggestion from multiple people during Wednesday morning’s tour of Fulton Street Food Hall, which opened about one month ago across from check-in at Harrah’s Las Vegas.

It was a delicious suggestion, and now the cinnamon roll (light — not dense — and perfectly sweet), and Fulton Street Food Hall are two more reasons to make your way to the under-the-radar Harrah’s, joining “Million Dollar Quartet,” Mac King, chef Kerry Simon’s KGB Burger, the Improv, Ruth’s Chris (now that the Paradise location is closed) and Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar Grill.

Harrah’s Food Beverage Director Bradley Bittermann and Fulton Street General Manager Markos Mendoza, previously at Ruth’s Chris and Bacchanal Buffet at Caesars Palace, led the tour of Fulton Street — think Whole Foods (except you won’t spend your whole paycheck) and a really elevated food court that’s warm, inviting and bursting with options.

The former space of Ming’s and the 24-hour cafe features sit-down breakfast from 6 to 11 a.m. (other sections are open 24/7); late-night pizza until 3 a.m.; gourmet pizzas; soup station (the Greek lemon yogurt with tofu cheese soup was inventive and bursting with flavor); create-your-own salad bar; a gorgeous and colorful sandwich station with eight bread selections; sushi bar; and noodle bar with ramen and udon.

Mendoza’s team at Fulton Street Food Hall includes chefs John Witte, Antonio Velasquez, Brenda Dolan and Victor Low, while David DeLeo oversees the adjoining, and nonsmoking, bar.

“Everything is fresh and consistent and made in-house every single day,” Witte said. Sampled and tasty: Pastries (the black and white cookie was divine, the cannoli crunchy, as it should be); eggs Benedict with prosciutto; Greek lemon yogurt soup; crispy noodles with shrimp and bok choy; and ramen.

Now please pass another cinnamon roll.

Don Chareunsy is senior editor for arts and entertainment of the Las Vegas Sun.

Robin Leach has been a journalist for more than 50 years and has spent the past decade giving readers the inside scoop on Las Vegas, the world’s premier platinum playground.

Follow Sun AE Senior Editor Don Chareunsy on Twitter at Twitter.com/VDLXEditorDon.

Follow Robin Leach on Twitter at Twitter.com/Robin_Leach.

Follow Vegas DeLuxe on Twitter at Twitter.com/vegasdeluxe.

Harrah’s

Just as distinctive as it’s famous neighbors Caesar’s Palace and The Venetian, Harrah’s Las Vegas has been entertaining guests since 1973. The 87,700-square foot casino is filled with 1,520 slot machines and 107 gaming tables. Outside the casino, guests are able to experience fun in a street-fair atmosphere at the Carnival Court, an outdoor lounge with live entertainment (including the bartenders), food stands and outdoor shops.

At Harrah’s comedy is King, and that has never been more apparent then the comedy acts of Rita Rudner, the Mac King Comedy Magic Show and the Improv Comedy Club. After the show, guests are more than welcome to laugh at their friends at The Piano Bar, famous for its dueling pianos and karaoke. Most recently, Harrah’s added tribute show “Legends in Concert” to its list of entertainment.

Restaurants like Ming’s offers Asian cuisine, while Ruth’s Chris Steak House offers guests fine steaks and fresh seafood. Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar is a country-themed bar with a restaurant, live music and the occasional appearance from Keith himself.

702-369-5000

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