Browsing articles in "street food"
Nov 27, 2013
Tim Lester

Thick Thighs and Paris Street Food

2013-11-15-419970_640897459547_1138715108_n.jpg

I used to overindulge in the edible and enjoyable. So when I went to Paris last year food was my focus. I won’t review my tête-à-tête with the Parisians in entirety because there is a multitude of reviews detailing their fashion, architecture, and museums. The travel tip to be taken from this story is that you can have amazing cuisine in Paris on a budget. I ate 80 percent of my food at French versions of hot dog stands.

I largely write about my relationship with food and this travel piece will be no different. My review is about street food and the thickening of my thighs in the City of Light.

Food deprivation or restrictive regimes were never options. I was in the capital of cuisine; the land of delicious and expensive fare. I carefully budgeted to partake in all of the over-priced cream-based food excursions I could stomach. I embarked on my journey knowing that my food choices would derail whatever diet I was on at the time.

To rationalize the food orgy that was sure to commence once I landed in the land of wine, bread and cheese, I fooled myself into thinking I was prepared to walk everywhere my friends and I went. It wasn’t the best plan.

My heady consumption of Paris street food came by happenstance. On my first night in Paris I walked down the Rue des Gardes looking for a specific restaurant, but it was getting late. My friend and I were lost — and the restaurant was nowhere to be found. Paris dinner times are strict. Natives eat from about 8 to 11:30 p.m. After a day in Versailles we were starving and it was already 11:00 p.m. Restaurants were steadily closing when we turned a corner and saw a collective of greasy spoons serving a plethora of pan-fried goodness. My nose was stimulated by stand after stand of amazing smells. It was then that one of the chefs stepped from behind his stall to call after us.

A crepe, some chicken, and curry put me into an unfamiliar bliss. The fatty food was too flavorful to regret. I was hooked. When I woke in the morning, I searched for my breakfast at more food stands. I snubbed all the fancy restaurants that were on my list.

We resided in a studio located inside the 11th Arrondissement, near the Bastille, on the Rue de Montreuil. It was the perfect location for my new obsession.The neighborhood was jam packed with food stands and open-door hole in the wall boulangeries.

I devoured 1.5€ caramel-filled beignets and croissants in the morning. At lunch it was chicken curried and stuffed with varied cheeses into baguettes, or a delicious 5€ croque monsieur. Dinner was a hodgepodge of expertly made pastas and dinner sandwiches. I don’t think I bought more than one meal over 10€ my whole time in Paris.

That trip taught me about my power over food. Food is a choice. What I eat, and when I eat is totally up to me. There are no excuses. I ate street food because I wanted to and I liked it-not because I couldn’t afford to eat elsewhere. Eighteen months later, I have a healthier relationship with food. When I go to Paris this year my food choice will not be the same. That choice is not a restriction; it’s a decision.

Before I left Paris I did the obligatory fancy meal on the Champs Elysees at a really cute bistro that served me a delicious salmon and whitefish dish. That was 8 times the 10€ I spent on my previous meals but the experience was priceless. It was a healthy and expensive choice I gladly made.

I wish my thighs would have thanked me for the light reprieve. I returned to the states not able to fit my thighs into my favorite jeans. The food was still worth every extra inch.

Read More about Akela’s journey at Sanity




Follow Akela Stanfield on Twitter:

www.twitter.com/aqueenofsanity

Recommended Reading

Nov 26, 2013
Tim Lester

Philippa Sibley to leave Albert Street Food & Wine

‘; var fr = document.getElementById(adID); setHash(fr, hash); fr.body = body; var doc = getFrameDocument(fr); doc.open(); doc.write(body); setTimeout(function() {closeDoc(getFrameDocument(document.getElementById(adID)))}, 2000); } function renderJIFAdWithInterim(holderID, adID, srcUrl, width, height, hash, bodyAttributes) { setHash(document.getElementById(holderID), hash); document.dcdAdsR.push(adID); document.write(”); } function renderIJAd(holderID, adID, srcUrl, hash) { document.dcdAdsAA.push(holderID); setHash(document.getElementById(holderID), hash); document.write(” + ‘ript’); } function renderJAd(holderID, adID, srcUrl, hash) { document.dcdAdsAA.push(holderID); setHash(document.getElementById(holderID), hash); document.dcdAdsH.push(holderID); document.dcdAdsI.push(adID); document.dcdAdsU.push(srcUrl); } function er_showAd() { var regex = new RegExp(“externalReferrer=(.*?)(; |$)”, “gi”); var value = regex.exec(document.cookie); if (value value.length == 3) { var externalReferrer = value[1]; return (!FD.isInternalReferrer() || ((externalReferrer) (externalReferrer 0))); } return false; } function isHome() { var loc = “” + window.location; loc = loc.replace(“//”, “”); var tokens = loc.split(“/”); if (tokens.length == 1) { return true; } else if (tokens.length == 2) { if (tokens[1].trim().length == 0) { return true; } } return false; } function checkAds(checkStrings) { var cs = checkStrings.split(‘,’); for (var i = 0; i 0 || document.dcdAdsAG.length 0) { var pingServerParams = “i=”; var sep = “”; for (var i=0;i 0 h.indexOf(c) 0) { empty = true; break; } } return empty; } function pingAdStatus() { if (isHome ()) { return; } if (document.pingServerAdParams document.pingServerAdParams.length 0) { var pingServerUrl = “/action/pingServerAction?” + document.pingServerAdParams; var xmlHttp = null; try { xmlHttp = new XMLHttpRequest(); } catch(e) { try { xmlHttp = new ActiveXObject(“Microsoft.XMLHttp”); } catch(e) { xmlHttp = null; } } if (xmlHttp != null) { xmlHttp.open( “GET”, pingServerUrl, true); xmlHttp.send( null ); } } } function initAds(log, checkStrings) { for (var i=0;i 0) { doc.removeChild(doc.childNodes[0]); } doc.open(); var newBody = fr.body; if (getCurrentOrd(newBody) != “” ) { newBody = newBody.replace(“;ord=”+getCurrentOrd(newBody), “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } else { newBody = newBody.replace(“;ord=”, “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } doc.write(newBody); document.dcdsAdsToClose.push(fr.id); } } else { var newSrc = fr.src; if (getCurrentOrd(newSrc) != “” ) { newSrc = newSrc.replace(“;ord=”+getCurrentOrd(newSrc), “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } else { newSrc = newSrc.replace(“;ord=”, “;ord=” + Math.floor(100000000*Math.random())); } fr.src = newSrc; } } } if (document.dcdsAdsToClose.length 0) { setTimeout(function() {closeOpenDocuments(document.dcdsAdsToClose)}, 500); } } }; var ie = isIE(); if(ie typeof String.prototype.trim !== ‘function’) { String.prototype.trim = function() { return this.replace(/^s+|s+$/g, ”); }; } document.dcdAdsH = new Array(); document.dcdAdsI = new Array(); document.dcdAdsU = new Array(); document.dcdAdsR = new Array(); document.dcdAdsEH = new Array(); document.dcdAdsE = new Array(); document.dcdAdsEC = new Array(); document.dcdAdsAA = new Array(); document.dcdAdsAI = new Array(); document.dcdAdsAG = new Array(); document.dcdAdsToClose = new Array(); document.igCount = 0; document.tCount = 0; var dcOrd = Math.floor(100000000*Math.random()); document.dcAdsCParams = “”; var savValue = getAdCookie(“sav”); if (savValue != null savValue.length 2) { document.dcAdsCParams = savValue + “;”; } document.dcAdsCParams += “csub={csub};”;

Good Food





Food News

Albert Street Food  Wine.

Changes … Albert Street Food Wine. Photo: Rodger Cummins


Chef Philippa Sibley is moving on from Albert Street Food Wine.

Sibley confirmed she has resigned as head chef of the one-hat Brunswick restaurant. Her departure follows those of front-of-house managers Stuart Brookshaw and Ruth Giffney earlier this month.

“I came to the end of my two-year contract,” says Sibley, whose second cookbook, New Classics, was published this month. “My work here is done and the kitchen team I’m handing over to are great.”

Philippa Sibley.

Philippa Sibley is leaving the restaurant. Photo: Eddie Jim

She leaves Jason Rodwell in charge of the kitchen, with sous chef Jasper Avent and pastry chef Katey Rodgers.

The diner was awarded one hat in The Age Good Food Guide 2013 and maintained it in the latest edition.

As for Sibley’s next move, Espresso believes there are plans afoot for a collaboration with Jason Jones, co-owner of cafes Friends of Mine in Richmond, Balwyn’s Snow Pony and Porgie and Mr Jones in Hawthorn, in a Melbourne CBD business.  Watch this space.

recipe collections


Christmas pudding.

Christmas feasts

Take your pick of these festive-themed ideas from our team.
View this event


Vanilla creme-catalan.

Decadent desserts

End your next dinner party on a high note with these dessert recipes.
View this event


Brigitte Hafner's penne with broccoli.

Beautiful broccoli

Not only is broccoli good for you, it’s easy and versatile to cook with too.
View this event


Neil Perry's aged rib-eye steak with tomato, onion and chipotle salsa.

The complete barbecue guide

The rules, tools and recipes you need to perfect the art of cooking over flames.
View this event


Tunisian breakfast soup with greens.

Meat-free recipes

Vegetarian fare is no longer the poor-cousin to meat-based dishes.
View this event


Good guides


Cover of the SMH Good Food Guide 2014.

Good Food Guide 2014

Full coverage of The Sydney Morning Herald Good Food Guide 2014.
View this event


events


Aaron Turner.

What’s on November: Melbourne

Aaron Turner and friends cook in the dark, and plenty more interesting events this month.
View this event


The Age Good Food Guide 2014.

The Age Good Food Guide

The 2014 edition is out now.
View this event


Shoot The Chef 2013.

Time to Shoot the Chef

The Shoot the Chef photographic competition is coming to Victoria as part of Good Food Month.
View this event


good food guide


Queensland Good Food Guide 2013 cover. Illustration: John Shakespeare

QLD Good Food Guide 2013

The Queensland Good Food Guide 2013 is now available.
View this event


columns


p

Moroccan salads a colourful affair

Here are five colourful and delicious salads which go wonderfully well together.
View this event


Bryan Martin.

So busy and it’s not yet dawn

Behind the scenes in a baker’s shop
View this event


i/i

Digging the good life

Merici students have an enviable garden, complete with chooks
View this event


i/i

Growing capsciums in a cold climate

Here’s how.
View this event


p

Against the grain

Kate McKay finds farro in her quest for the good life.
View this event


Advertisement

Portraits for the new Good Food - SMH. Jill Dupleix. Tuesday 30th October 2012. Photograph by James Brickwood. SMH NEWS 121030

It’s great date food, because there’s lots of activity. 

Jill Dupleix

Good Food columnists.

How can anyone not like coriander? 

Richard Cornish

Wine agony aunt.

Bottled wines under any kind of seal can suffer a range of woes. 

Wine agony aunt

Kirsten Lawson dinkus for goodfood.com.au.

Keeping you up-to-date with Canberra’s food scene. 

Kirsten Lawson

Your say…

Mug shot.

IanC says:

Still using the ceramic cup I bought at a conference in 1987. I’m sure it’s …
Read more

Mug shot.

Anna says:

I love the idea of a KeepCup, but having tried one, found it had a distinctive …
Read more

Mug shot.

Sif says:

changing habits isn’t as simple as telling people they should – until there is …
Read more

Mug shot.

OmGoodnessMe says:

I love my KeepCup. Just rinse to wash. I drink it black so I guess milk may …
Read more

Mug shot.

Eadybaby says:

I think that every individual needs to play their small part in being …
Read more

Mug shot.

Kir says:

I like the idea of getting charged less when buying a coffee at a cafe if you …
Read more

Mug shot.

Tea drinker says:

Just in case you’re feeling virtuous about sipping your soy latte out of a …
Read more

Mug shot.

Numbers check says:

“a ceramic cup embodied 14 megajoules of energy, compared with 6.3 for reusable …
Read more

Mug shot.

DiSGracefully says:

Granted KeepCups are a more environmentally friendly than one-use cups, but the …
Read more

Mug shot.

Richard says:

Well I’m glad to read there are a few keepcup users. The unfortunate reality is …
Read more


Your say…

Mug shot.

IanC says:

Still using the ceramic cup I bought at a conference in 1987. I’m sure it’s …
Read more

Mug shot.

Anna says:

I love the idea of a KeepCup, but having tried one, found it had a distinctive …
Read more

Mug shot.

Sif says:

changing habits isn’t as simple as telling people they should – until there is …
Read more

Mug shot.

OmGoodnessMe says:

I love my KeepCup. Just rinse to wash. I drink it black so I guess milk may …
Read more

Mug shot.

Eadybaby says:

I think that every individual needs to play their small part in being …
Read more

Mug shot.

Kir says:

I like the idea of getting charged less when buying a coffee at a cafe if you …
Read more

Mug shot.

Tea drinker says:

Just in case you’re feeling virtuous about sipping your soy latte out of a …
Read more

Mug shot.

Numbers check says:

“a ceramic cup embodied 14 megajoules of energy, compared with 6.3 for reusable …
Read more

Mug shot.

DiSGracefully says:

Granted KeepCups are a more environmentally friendly than one-use cups, but the …
Read more

Mug shot.

Richard says:

Well I’m glad to read there are a few keepcup users. The unfortunate reality is …
Read more


Your say…

Mug shot.

IanC says:

Still using the ceramic cup I bought at a conference in 1987. I’m sure it’s …
Read more

Mug shot.

Anna says:

I love the idea of a KeepCup, but having tried one, found it had a distinctive …
Read more

Mug shot.

Sif says:

changing habits isn’t as simple as telling people they should – until there is …
Read more

Mug shot.

OmGoodnessMe says:

I love my KeepCup. Just rinse to wash. I drink it black so I guess milk may …
Read more

Mug shot.

Eadybaby says:

I think that every individual needs to play their small part in being …
Read more

Mug shot.

Kir says:

I like the idea of getting charged less when buying a coffee at a cafe if you …
Read more

Mug shot.

Tea drinker says:

Just in case you’re feeling virtuous about sipping your soy latte out of a …
Read more

Mug shot.

Numbers check says:

“a ceramic cup embodied 14 megajoules of energy, compared with 6.3 for reusable …
Read more

Mug shot.

DiSGracefully says:

Granted KeepCups are a more environmentally friendly than one-use cups, but the …
Read more

Mug shot.

Richard says:

Well I’m glad to read there are a few keepcup users. The unfortunate reality is …
Read more


Your say…

Mug shot.

IanC says:

Still using the ceramic cup I bought at a conference in 1987. I’m sure it’s …
Read more

Mug shot.

Anna says:

I love the idea of a KeepCup, but having tried one, found it had a distinctive …
Read more

Mug shot.

Sif says:

changing habits isn’t as simple as telling people they should – until there is …
Read more

Mug shot.

OmGoodnessMe says:

I love my KeepCup. Just rinse to wash. I drink it black so I guess milk may …
Read more

Mug shot.

Eadybaby says:

I think that every individual needs to play their small part in being …
Read more

Mug shot.

Kir says:

I like the idea of getting charged less when buying a coffee at a cafe if you …
Read more

Mug shot.

Tea drinker says:

Just in case you’re feeling virtuous about sipping your soy latte out of a …
Read more

Mug shot.

Numbers check says:

“a ceramic cup embodied 14 megajoules of energy, compared with 6.3 for reusable …
Read more

Mug shot.

DiSGracefully says:

Granted KeepCups are a more environmentally friendly than one-use cups, but the …
Read more

Mug shot.

Richard says:

Well I’m glad to read there are a few keepcup users. The unfortunate reality is …
Read more


Your say…

Mug shot.

IanC says:

Still using the ceramic cup I bought at a conference in 1987. I’m sure it’s …
Read more

Mug shot.

Anna says:

I love the idea of a KeepCup, but having tried one, found it had a distinctive …
Read more

Mug shot.

Sif says:

changing habits isn’t as simple as telling people they should – until there is …
Read more

Mug shot.

OmGoodnessMe says:

I love my KeepCup. Just rinse to wash. I drink it black so I guess milk may …
Read more

Mug shot.

Eadybaby says:

I think that every individual needs to play their small part in being …
Read more

Mug shot.

Kir says:

I like the idea of getting charged less when buying a coffee at a cafe if you …
Read more

Mug shot.

Tea drinker says:

Just in case you’re feeling virtuous about sipping your soy latte out of a …
Read more

Mug shot.

Numbers check says:

“a ceramic cup embodied 14 megajoules of energy, compared with 6.3 for reusable …
Read more

Mug shot.

DiSGracefully says:

Granted KeepCups are a more environmentally friendly than one-use cups, but the …
Read more

Mug shot.

Richard says:

Well I’m glad to read there are a few keepcup users. The unfortunate reality is …
Read more




Advertisement













Recommended Reading

Nov 26, 2013
Tim Lester

City Council Meeting Preview: Street Performer Regulation, Food Trucks Survey

News, City Council, Third Street Promenade, Santa Monica

Posted Nov. 25, 2013, 9:11 am

Parimal M. Rohit / Staff Writer

Street performers are no strangers to anyone who visits the Third Street Promenade or Santa Monica Pier. The City Council will be considering Tuesday an ordinance proposing to impose stiffer regulations for street performers who pose a threat to public safety.

City Hall issues permits to street performers who seek to occupy a space on the Promenade, Pier, or Transit Mall.

Under current City law, a street performer’s permit could be suspended or revoked with a minimum of two offenses.

The proposed ordinance recommends altering the Municipal Code to give City Hall an opportunity to revoke or suspend a permit based upon one violation, depending on its severity.

“The Santa Monica Municipal Code (SMMC) requires a minimum of two performance-related offenses of the SMMC to suspend or revoke a performer’s permit, regardless of the severity of the first offense even if one of the offenses is severe, such as falsifying information on an application,” City staff stated. “In a recent case, a performer falsified his application by indicating “no” to the question of whether or not he was a registered sex offender.  This offense constituted only the first violation of the law, not the second, and therefore limited the options available to staff to address this issue.”

Also, the proposed ordinance recommends council members to amend the Municipal Code to allow for greater enforcement of lottery results to perform on the Pier.

The lottery allocating performance locations to street performers on the Pier “does not explicitly require performers to abide by the results of the lottery, nor does it specifically ban the sale or transfer of the temporary lottery allocation permit,” City staff stated.

Council members will also be weighing in and potentially giving City staff direction on permitting and zoning for off-street food truck venues in the Main Street Commercial District.

The call for a staff direction was spawned by a survey of Main Street businesses and food truck patrons “to assess potential impacts of the Tuesday night food truck event at the California Heritage Museum on area businesses.”

The survey results indicate that the food trucks have minimal impact on the Main Street businesses, City staff stated. “In addition, in response to Council direction to propose a limited term permit to authorize off-street food truck venues, staff recommends that the updated Zoning Ordinance provide a permit that would allow off-street food truck venues up to a three year term with the potential for permit re-application.”

Maureen Erbeznik and Associates conducted the survey and, according to City staff, canvassed “food truck patrons, Main Street businesses and Main Street patrons for the purposes of reassessing the economic impacts of the food truck event on Main Street businesses.”

The surveys were conducted in January, April, and May. According to City staff, 112 food truck patrons, 65 Main Street patrons, and 59 Main Street businesses completed the survey.

“Based on the patron and business surveys as well as tax revenue review, the findings suggest the California Heritage Museum food truck event does not appear to have a significant negative impact to Main Street business activity,” City staff stated.

Full analysis of the survey results and potential council direction will be provided in Friday’s edition of The Mirror.

citizen p said…

30 million for a park and we still can’t even get wifi in joscelyn park!! . Fire the mayor and city manager now!!!

Recommended Reading

Nov 26, 2013
Tim Lester

Internets Celebrities NYC eats series, ‘Food Warriors: West 4th Street’


Rafi Kam, Dallas Penn, and Casimir Nozkowski, the Internets Celebrities, take the “A Train” in search of excellent New York street food. They end up eating goat ice cream.

My $.02: John’s Pizza (not Joe’s) in that area is always the correct answer! And Ellary’s Greens, next to the goat ice cream place they tried, is also good for green juice and healthy plates. [Video Link]

Recommended Reading

Nov 24, 2013
Tim Lester

The ugly side of street food

Issues with food hygiene and care keep rising and have always been a factor of great concern.

But still, one can find large number of folks indulging in what is termed as street food, something that is incomparable in taste but at the same time, takes a toll on one’s stomach. Despite being cooked under visibly unhygienic conditions, people flock to roadside chat shops serving some of the most contaminated foods and beverages.

All the campaigns about eating and drinking healthy go down the drain when something appealing to the eye catches one’s attention. “Street food has always been a trend amongst college students like us. As long as it tastes good nobody really cares about the conditions in which they are cooked. Plus, it is easy on your pocket. It is not always possible to ensure the safety of the food you consume if you are buying it from a street shop,” says Drishti, a student. Low cost and easy availability of fast food makes it popular. “Though hygiene is a major concern, it is the taste that pushes people to take risk with their health. Lack of hygienic food at low cost is another major cause,” adds Peeyush Pavanan, a IT professional.

Many a time, the vegetables are pre cut, stored in containers for days together until used. While visiting a few such fast-food outlets in Commercial Street here, Deccan Herald came across more than 10 outlets that served onions that had been cut and kept for over 12 hours. They were out in the open amidst all the air pollution.

One argument is that the poor street food vendor does not have enough income to ensure world class cleanliness and sanitisation. But what about the food brands which have been serving people for more than 50 years? Basic sanitary measures such as gloves and caps were not worn by the vendors at some famous food outlets on Bridge Road. Many outlets are located right next to urinals and dumpyards that breed millions of pathogens and diseases such as cholera, typhoid and jaundice.  

A closer look at the process involved, from cutting the vegetables to finally serving cooked food on the plate, would reveal some startling facts.

For example, in the case of roadside dhabas and chat shops, used plates are at once put in a tub of water and cleaned collectively. Much grease and oil is left over on the spoons and bowls, which otherwise only vanish by washing them in hot water. Often, people are not bothered about the ingredients that go in to the making of food.

“We use only mineral water and wear plastic gloves,” says a chat vendor near Majestic. That turned out to be just a claim, as in reality he was found taking water from a nearby shop. In case of restaurants too, often one has to wipe the plates and glasses with tissues.

“After a few bad experiences, I have started to be at least aware of the process that goes into cooking the food that I consume. It would be unrealistic to expect very high standards from street food vendors. But some things at least should be taken into consideration like the kind of oils used or the raw vegetables. Uncooked cabbage and precut onions are some of the most dangerous food items and If the outlet is next to a dumpyad or urinal, it is best to turn away from it for obvious reasons,” cautions Ishika Gupta, a research student.

“Ideally, the whole idea of food safety and hygiene revolves around storage and temperature factors. From the time the raw materials arrive to the point it reaches a plate, food needs to be under constant watch,” explains Anupam Banerjee, Executive Chef, The Ritz Carlton. “People handling food must, first of all, ensure that their hands are sanitised. Secondly, the different levels of temperatures at the time of consumption, storage etc have to be set for the food to remain fresh,” he says.

Most pathogens grow if the temperature set is not right for storage. For instance, once the meat is cut and is frozen immediately, it can be used up to a month. On the other hand, one that is stored in room temperatures do not last beyond three days. The thawing process also should not be forced,” he informs with the expertise gained from years of managing a star hotel kitchen.     

Go to Top



<!– BEGIN JS TAG – Deccanherald_Cpc_468x60

Recommended Reading

Nov 24, 2013
Tim Lester

Toni On! New York: The Ultimate Food Crawl



NEW YORK(CBSNewYork) — If you love New York City like we love New York City then tag along with Toni On! We uncover hidden city secrets, show you the coolest stuff to do and hunt down the best treats because we love to eat! If you’re looking for a good time, Toni is your go-to guide!

This week WLNY’s Toni Senecal went on a food crawl down Smith Street where she dabbled in ramen, southern comfort food, and more.

You can catch up with Toni on her blog, and loyal Toni On! followers can score a sweet VIP deal by friending the show on Facebook, and following our Toni On! Tweets on Twitter.

You can catch more of Toni on WLNY 10/55, Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and midnight, and on CBS 2 on Sundays at 5:30 a.m.

 Amazing Southern Comfort Food

 Ramen Has Made A Huge Comeback

 Get Your Stank On At Stinky Brooklyn

You May Also Be Interested In These Stories

Recommended Reading

Nov 24, 2013
Tim Lester

Some Good Street Food in Mumbai

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:”";
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-bidi-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;}

Normal
0

false
false
false

EN-US
X-NONE
X-NONE

MicrosoftInternetExplorer4

/* Style Definitions */
table.MsoNormalTable
{mso-style-name:”Table Normal”;
mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0;
mso-tstyle-colband-size:0;
mso-style-noshow:yes;
mso-style-priority:99;
mso-style-qformat:yes;
mso-style-parent:”";
mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt;
mso-para-margin-top:0in;
mso-para-margin-right:0in;
mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt;
mso-para-margin-left:0in;
line-height:115%;
mso-pagination:widow-orphan;
font-size:11.0pt;
font-family:”Calibri”,”sans-serif”;
mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri;
mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin;
mso-fareast-font-family:”Times New Roman”;
mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast;
mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri;
mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin;}

So what is it that takes a gourmand to the streets and what is special about Mumbai street food? To answer both, we have to land right on these streets filled with the spice of life and the joie de vivre. Feeding many the daily lunch and dinner, the simplicity and ease with which people settle down to good food here is a mark in itself. People in Mumbai are very particular about health so street food in Mumbai comes with its guarantee of healthy food and tasty snacks easy on the stomach.

Canon Pav Bhaji

A simple joint in CST, this is a standing example of how a simple eatery can be popular across the city on because of its delicious fare and quick service. The choicest of pav bhaji, Mumbai’s staple street food, this is a place where you are assured of this delicious stuff, leaving you licking your lips shamelessly.

Paanch Building, Matunga

No one till today has ever called this building by its real name. No one also knows what it is, for it is popularly called the Paanch Building Matunga. One gets the best kind of chaat here, be it Bhel puri, paani puri and ragda patties. You also get sev puri and dahi sev puri etc, but the pani puri here is a hot selling item. Located in the junction of King’s circle and Bhaudaji Road, this is a must visit spot for all lovers of street food in Mumbai.

Jay Sandwich

Anyone who has been a student of National College in Bandra and Mithibai behind would vouch for the sandwiches doled out at Jay Sandwich centre, which has been existing since 30 years. Run by two brothers Jay and Vijay, this is another meeting hub for students old and new, who come here just to enjoy the taste of the cheese, veggies and the chutney sandwiches here.

Ayappa Idli Stall, Matunga

For street food freaks, the ambience is secondary, the taste is the priority. Ayappa Idli Stall is a living example of this. No one would believe that this modest, dinghy at the corner of Sankara Matham and in front of Bhajana Samaj, would be the much sought after street food stall for South Indian food. With hot sambar flowing down your throats, this is sure to quench the thirst of the interested foodie.

Raju Sandwich

For college goers,   a quick bite at a low cost, is what that sells. Raju knows this well and caters to the needs of the college students of SIES College of Commerce, Sion. A cycle as his shop, he whips out the tastiest sandwiches with the speed of a machine. Fulfilling everyone’s requirements, he is quick with calculation and has a constant smile on his face. This is a favourite of all in and around this area.

Gaondevi Pani Puri Wala, Thane

Anyone who feels Thane is a suburb, which is underdeveloped, is sadly mistaken . For today, Thane is the best upcoming suburb and has the best pizzerias, cafeterias, and coffee shops in town. Yet people head for the Gaondevi Pani Puri Wala in Gaondevi in Thane. Located a little away from Alok hotel, this serves pani puri all day long, along with sukha bhel, ragda patties, dahi puri, bhel puri and sev puri. There is something about the mix people say, that makes you want to come back here again.

There are more places to cover, but that would be in the next list of eateries in street food in Mumbai. Till then, happy eating, stay healthy.

Recommended Reading

Nov 23, 2013
Tim Lester

Street food vending in urban Ghana: moving from an informal to a formal sector


Feature Article of Saturday, 23 November 2013

Columnist:

Email this

Share This

Print This

Comments (0)

By Mohamed Ag Bendech (Mohamed.AgBendech@fao.org)

James Tefft (James.Tefft@fao.org)

Richemont Seki (Richemont.Seki@fao.org)

Giorgia Fiorella Nicolo (Giorgia.Nicolo@fao.org)

Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations / Regional Office for Africa

Street food vending in urban Ghana is an increasing popular informal business that allows people to eat affordable, local and varied foods, while representing an important source of income for many vulnerable families.

Despite its advantages, street food vending is considered to be a major cause of health hazards such as food borne diseases. The main contributing factors are the poor vending environments and the vendors’ practices. It is therefore important to assist and support this informal sector to the benefit of the whole nation.

Results of a study on street vending in Accra, conducted between December 2011 and May 2012, by the Food and Agriculture Organisation of the United Nations (FAO), Regional Office for Africa, sheds some light on the socioeconomic status of the different actors in the sector and the actions required to improve food safety and nutritional quality of street foods. The study showed that out of 99 vendors interviewed, 95% were females and 47.3% had a secondary level of education. Most of them were married (68%) and the number of people in their household on an average is four.

The vendors

In urban Ghana, street food vendors are mainly from underprivileged and middle socio-economic groups. In most cases, their level of education is low and it is therefore difficult for them to have access to formal employment. The vendors usually start the business with low investment and do not have access to loans, and this prevents them from extending their business. The vending is usually on a family-basis, with the vendor operating most of the time with family members.

The consumers

Mainly two types of street food consumers can be found in urban Ghana. The first consists of the poor population that relies completely on street food to cover their daily needs. The second one comprises of workers and students/pupils. Generally, the working place or the school is far from the house and it is difficult to return home for lunch. In addition to that, many institutions/schools, either private or public do not have a canteen on their premises. This easily explains the fact that many workers and students/pupils consume street foods particularly during lunch hours.

Tailor made capacity development

Several initiatives have been conducted in order to develop capacities of street food vendors in terms of food safety and quality; less has been done with reference to the nutritional importance of the food sold on the streets and the entrepreneurial aspects of this activity. However, the high number of cases of food borne diseases calls for more action, especially in the Greater Accra Region, as the street food vending sector continue to expand. Public institutions, vendors and consumers all have a great role to play in ensuring safety of the street foods. National and local institutions, among others, with the support of international organisations and NGOs can work to strengthen and promote the available tools and guidelines and join forces to effectively train the different actors involved in the sector.

Streamline registration

All Street food vendors should register to the Accra Metropolitan Assembly and must have authorisation prior to start their activity (development and building permit, business operating permit, health certificate, among others). The purpose is to ensure that every vendor is healthy and operates in a suitable environment.

In practice, most street food vendors do not comply with the complex set of authorisations needed for food vending. As an example, the study revealed that 16 vendors out of 98 did not have any vending permit. The rest of the interviewed vendors were able to show only the health certificate, which is just one of the many authorisations needed for vending. Though considerable efforts have been made by the Government in terms of promoting registration, many challenges remain: the long and costly procedure (mainly in terms of days spent out of work), the difficulty to access proper information (given the low literacy level of many vendors) and the low enforcement by local authorities due to limited resources.

For all the reasons above, streamlining the registration process alongside with promoting awareness raising campaigns could motivate the vendors to obtain the proper authorisation and see their ventures formally recognised by public authorities.

Institutionalizing street food vending

Many schools and institutions rely on street food vending for the provision of food to their students and/or pupils and it is common to see vendors stably installed around schools and institutions. This relationship needs to be strengthened and institutionalized. The benefits will be on both sides. The customers (workers, students/pupils) will have access to safe and affordable foods, while vendors will rely on a regular source of income and will benefit from the institution’s infrastructures (source of drinking water, electricity, waste management). In addition, this approach could also compensate for the lack of canteens in schools and institutions. Appropriate mechanisms such as prepaid food coupons can be set up to facilitate the creation of these formal relationships. Public institutions in charge of controlling street food vending should also be involved to ensure quality of the food sold.

Despite the health hazards and its informality, street food vending is an important source of income for many Ghanaians and helps in fighting food insecurity and poverty in urban areas. It is therefore important to support this sector to be more formal. This will result in reducing the risks, ensuring consistent and regular earnings, both for the vendors and the Government. This approach needs strong participation of the Government, as well as the Civil Society and the Development Partners.

Recommended Reading

Nov 22, 2013
Tim Lester

The Golden Owl Dishes Burmese Street Food in La Puente

Golden-Owl-Rainbow-Salad.jpgC. ChiaoRainbow salad at The Golden OwlWe’re spoiled by the scope of Asian food in Los Angeles, having the luxury to choose between a Gujarati vegetarian feast or Punjabi-style tandoori dishes, ramen hailing from Hokkaido or Sapporo. But when it comes to Burmese food, it’s likely that most of us can only count the number of restaurants serving it with one hand and the cuisine’s notable dishes with the other.

Shwe Lynn Chin opened The Golden Owl in La Puente for this very reason, intent on making mohinga (a fish vermicelli soup considered Burma’s national dish), coconut chicken noodle and rainbow salad just as commonplace. Now in a soft-open phase, Chin is still tweaking the menu and trying to streamline kitchen protocol. At the moment, the restaurant features a reasonably priced one-page menu with options ranging from noodles to rice bowls to sandwiches.

Chin began setting up The Golden Owl earlier this year, after having left her job as a molecular biology lab researcher at City of Hope. The idea of opening a Burmese restaurant itself dates back to her days of studying English when she first arrived to the United States.

“I took a class where the professor liked to learn about foods from other cultures and we were asked to write about dishes from our culture. It made me wonder, ‘How come people know about Japanese food and Thai food? How come nobody knows about Burmese food?’”

See also: 3 Notable Restaurant Openings in the San Gabriel Valley

Made to order, the dishes are Chin’s interpretations of family recipes and popular street food. Her background in science inspired her to put a more healthful spin on the dishes. “In Burma, mohinga, hand-mixed salads and coconut chicken noodles are considered fast food. Street vendors would focus on one dish. It made more sense for me to serve this type of food with the layout of my restaurant.”

She explained the menu was designed to maximize the potential of the restaurant’s small two-room space. It shares a lot with a drive-thru dairy stand; both are steps away from a gas station down the corner.

“Customers come back and tell me that they’re craving coconut chicken noodle soup or rainbow salad. It makes me happy, you know?” she says. “I think, ‘Hey, it’s working’.”

The Golden Owl is open Tuesday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. The grand opening is scheduled for Sunday, Dec. 1.


Want more Squid Ink? Follow us on Twitter or like us on Facebook. Follow the author on Twitter at @chrstnchiao.

Location Info

Venue

Map

The Golden Owl

16423 Maplegrove St., La Puente, CA

Category: Restaurant

Recommended Reading

Nov 22, 2013
Tim Lester

Food Bank and Mission Street Food folks team up to offer restaurant gift …

SAN FRANCISCO, CA - NOVEMBER 01:  A worker moves a pallet of food onto a rack at the San Francisco Food Bank on November 1, 2013 in San Francisco, California.  An estimated 47 million Americans will see their food stamp benefits cut starting today as   temporary relief to the federal program ends with no new budget from a Congress to replace it. Under the new Supplemental Nutrition and Assistance Program (SNAP), a family of four that used to receive $668 per month will see that amount cut by $36.  (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)  Justin Sullivan

A worker moves a pallet of food onto a rack at the San Francisco Food Bank. Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

As the holiday season nears, the San Francisco and Marin Food Banks and ShareTable.org are partnering to give Bay Area diners another option for responsible, worthwhile, and delicious gift-giving.

ShareTable is the latest charitable project from Anthony Myint and the rest of the crew at Mission Street Food, which has evolved into several full-time restaurants like Mission Chinese Food, Commonwealth and Mission Bowling Club. All those restaurants have charitable components, and in particular, they’ve forged a meaningful relationship with the Food Bank.

Now, ShareTable and the Food Bank are partnering to sell $50 gift certificates to 25 of the Bay Area’s top restaurants. For every gift certificate sold, $5 will be donated to the Food Bank. For every $1 donated, the Food Bank can provide three meals for those in need.

The restaurants and food shops participating are some of the best in town: Ame, Aziza, Bar Agricole, Bi-Rite, Boulevard, Camino, Coi, Commonwealth, Cotogna, Foreign Cinema, Frances, Humphry Slocombe, Ichi Sushi, Jardiniere, Mission Chinese, Namu Gaji, Nopa, Nopalito, Outerlands, Prospect, Quince, Rich Table and State Bird Provisions

To buy gift certificates and do a little bit of good in this world, click here for more information on the philanthropic program and all the purchasing information.

Also, please do read this article in yesterday’s edition of the Chronicle on how you can help the Food Bank this holiday season

And don’t forget that the Food Bank is always looking for volunteers. The holiday schedule is pretty much full, but sign-ups for 2014 are underway. For more guidance on how to help, head over to the official website.

Recommended Reading

Pages:«1...64656667686970...330»
About - Contact - Privacy - Terms of Service