Browsing articles in "street food"
Sep 27, 2014
Tim Lester

Empanadas Aqui: Latin street food on Cincinnati’s streets

 

Empanadas Aqui

Where: Varies – check Facebook and Twitter | 513-399-7028.
Website: http://empanadasaqui.com/
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/empanadasaqui
Twitter: @empanadasaqui
Food: Empanadas
Prices: $3 – $4 per empanada (assorted flavors)

Signature dishes

If, around town, you should spot what looks like a short green school bus flying a Venezuelan flag, your eyes are not playing tricks on you. You’ve just hit the empanadas jackpot.

Empanadas Aqui, with its signature green food truck (converted from a short school bus), offers a wide variety of authentic and whimsical empanadas, enough to make any empanada lover happy. Empanadas are Latin American turnovers, and a first cousin of the Italian calzone.

On the menu: Savory and sweet empanadas. On the savory side, The Bad Girl leads the pack. This empanada is made with roasted and shredded chicken, punched up with roasted onions and peppers (red, yellow, orange and poblano), flavored with a house seasoning, and then mingled with cheddar cheese.

If beef is more your speed, try the Spicy Beef empanada. This popular empanada is made with slow-roasted and shredded beef, laced with hot cherry pepper, pepperoncini, and hot sauce.

The Cincy-Zuela packs in the best of Cincinnati and Venezuela. This fun-loving empanada is made with beef hot dog, Cincinnati style chili, and cheddar cheese — pretty much a cheese coney in an empanada shell.

How about “empanada pizza?” You’ll find classic pizza ingredients in The Zah: Pepperoni, marinara sauce and mozzarella cheese.

Other savory empanadas on the menu are: So Cheesy (white cheese), Domino (black beans and white cheese), Carne Molita (ground beef, tomatoes, onions, garlic, red peppers and house seasoning), and Carne Mechada (shredded beef, tomato-based sauce, red peppers, onions and house seasoning).

Empanadas Aqui sources its white cheese from Eduardo Rodriguez, the local artisan cheesemaker behind My Artisano Foods.

RELATEDMy Artisano Foods, where a master cheesemaker is at work

Don’t forget to drizzle your empanadas with a sauce of your choice at the pickup window. Help yourself to any of the three sauces: “Pink sauce” (mayonnaise and ketchup), garlic mayonnaise, and hot sauce.

On the sweet side, the Emporeo boasts a goodness of crushed Oreos and cream cheese, topped off with a sugar glaze. The Guava + Cream Cheese empanada is as its name suggests – a fruity hint of the tropics. These empanadas are a little bit like cheesecake, in a personal and portable pocket.

Become a WCPO Insider to read about how the truck started more than 2,000 miles away, and learn more about the owners.

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Sep 26, 2014
Tim Lester

Roy Choi Debuts Street Food on CNN

The Kogi chef’s new TV show offers an offbeat tribute to L.A. starting Oct. 13



September 26, 2014




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Chef, author, and food personality Roy Choi is quickly becoming one of the most prolific figures in the culinary world—a modern Renaissance man who deals in sauce-covered quesadillas and tofu hot pots. The latest feather in Choi’s cap is a new web miniseries titled Street Food with Roy Choiwhich will comprise of eight five-minute episodes that will all take place in Los Angeles.

In the show, Choi hits the town along with personalities from across the cultural spectrum, including Anthony Bourdain, Jon Favreau, Mike D of the Beastie Boys, and chef Michelle Phan. Though the show will involve food—including stops at Tsujita L.A. and Mariscos Jalisco—it will also take a larger view of the city and its multi-cultural inhabitants.

All eight parts of the miniseries will debut at once on Oct. 13 and will be available online. Check out a promo clip from Street Food with Roy Choi below.

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Sep 26, 2014
Tim Lester

Oakland street food: The documentary (Part 3)

“Comida Mobile” looks at the Latino experience as mirrored in the lives of pushcart vendors in Fruitvale, Oakland.

Miguel Montiel grew up supporting his family’s fruit cup stand. Now helping manage the business, he remains grateful for his parents as he pursues higher education.

View part one here and part two here.

To learn more about Oakland Local’s initiative on “Street Food: Meet the people who make it” click here. Read the previous installment about the daily life of vendors and the community they’ve cultivated here. Oakland Local staff members Barbara Grady and Simone Larson contributed to this story.

For more stories about Oakland’s street food vendors, follow Oakland Local on Facebook and Twitter. Join the conversation at #foodundocumented.

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Sep 26, 2014
Tim Lester

Fulton Street Food Hall Debuts at Harrah’s

Taking its cue from the street outside their own Harrah’s New Orleans Casino, the 24 hour Fulton Street Food Hall has arrived on the Strip at Harrah’s Las Vegas.

Revealed by Eater Vegas back in June, the upgraded food court takes over empty space after the resort shuttered Asian restaurant Ming’s Table and their coffee shop, The Café.

The 11,940-square-foot, open plan, nine different cuisine station concept was created with an estimated $3.5 million construction budget.

Options include pastries, pies, muffins and cakes enticing guests next to an adjacent coffee bar. A frozen yogurt station invites choose-your-own toppings. The pizza station is stocked with on-site built pies featuring Harrah’s “signature pizza crust and sauce.”

Homemade soups and baked potatoes accent a “create your own” salad bar. A large sandwich selection or heartier dishes like lasagna can be found at the “comfort food corner.”

The sushi bar offers daily specials and bento boxes to go and the noodle bar menu includes 10 pan-Asian noodle dishes and soups including ramen or wonton soup.

The resort is also advertising a “sit-down, off-the menu breakfast from 6 to 11:30 a.m.”

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Sep 26, 2014
Tim Lester

Soon You Can Binge-Watch All of Roy Choi’s Street Food Episodes on CNN

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  • CNN

Yesterday, Roy Choi and Anthony Bourdain held court at Pot, Choi’s Koreatown hot pot restaurant, to talk about what they’ve been up to at CNN. (Yes, much food was served; and yes, Bourdain wore an apron.)  As you may recall, Choi and Bourdain have worked together before, with Choi appearing on Bourdain’s L.A. episode of Parts Unknown and Choi’s first book, L.A. Son, coming out with Bourdain’s line of books at Ecco.

As for what’s going on now, the fourth season of Bourdain’s Parts Unknown premieres this Sunday, Sept. 28 at 9 p.m. And in even bigger news, at least in this town, Choi’s new show, Street Food, will be released on CNN on Oct. 13.

Here are a few things to consider before you find your clicker.

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  • CNN
  • Choi and Bourdain in Chinatown

Because the eight episodes of Street Food will be released across CNN’s digital platforms all at once, you can binge-watch it. Kind of like House of Cards, but with a lot better food — well, except for that D.C. rib joint Kevin Spacey likes so much. 

The episodes of Street Food are NOT hour-long mediations on strange food in strange lands (unless you consider L.A. a strange land, which many people still do), but 5-minute clips of vintage Choi. Yes, just five minute each. Because you can cram a lot of Choi into five minutes. (Here’s a clip.) The L.A. chef will be interviewing people, including Michelle Phan, Jon Favreau, Mike D., Sage Vaughn and Bourdain himself. And he’ll be talking not only about food, but the wider cultural scene as well, with subjects that will be familiar to those who’ve followed Choi’s career and interests over the years: hip-hop musicians, low-riders, the homeless, street artists, and more. “It all starts on the streets,” says Choi about his subject material — and his show itself.

“There will be food,” reassures Choi. Among the places he’ll visit in the first episodes? Mariscos Jalisco in East Los Angeles and the Tsujita L.A. ramen shop on Sawtelle. And yes, he and his crew got into the kitchen at Tsujita. “A lot of Asian kitchens don’t want you in there,” points out Choi. “‘I gotta get to work; why you in my way?’” And yes, the first eight episodes are all set in L.A. “We had to start in L.A.,” says Choi. “It’s where I’m from. And there are a lot of misconceptions about our city: We’re not what you want us to be.” As for the format, “It’s a kind of long-play look at a city, from many different angles.” A lot of people. A lot of 5-minute segments. The next city? Choi likes Detroit, also Chicago, Baltimore and Seattle. “As many cities as I can.”

Bourdain’s fourth season kicks off in Shanghai. Perhaps “the most aesthetically beautiful” of the cities Bourdain has so far visited on his show, and where our casual definition of foodie has little meaning: “Just about every Chinese person is a ‘foodie.’” What other places are coming up? Africa, Vietnam, the Bronx — and Iran. This last one was years in the making, says Bourdain. Years. Plural. “Iran is one of those subjects you can’t speak sensibly about without pissing people off,” Bourdain says. “Television doesn’t translate complicated issues well.” Indeed.

Another issue Bourdain will cover in the upcoming season: heroin. In one episode, he returns to Massachusetts, where he once spent time cooking in Provincetown — and once did his fair share of drugs. His most personal episode? “Well, I guess so. All the shows are about me.” 

So what advice has Bourdain given Choi on the occasion of the L.A. chef’s first cooking show?  ”I would never presume to tell Roy anything,” Bourdain says. Choi, on the other hand, apparently finally explained to Bourdain why L.A. doesn’t have the fine dining scene of, say, New York. It’s because New York is traditionally European, says Choi, whereas L.A. is and has long been Latino and Asian. Totally different cultural backgrounds, and thus completely separate dining trajectories. 

Finally, a brief message from Bourdain. He is not a journalist. Yeah, yeah, he has his own show on CNN and trails camera crews to Iran and Libya, but he’s not. He’s an essayist; he tells stories, from his own point of view. If you want journalists, they’ve apparently got those on CNN too. He’s just saying. 

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  • CNN
  • Michelle Phan grabs a selfie with Roy Choi.


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Sep 25, 2014
Tim Lester

Street Eat’n newest addition to food truck scene

Sioux Falls will soon get a taste of its newest food truck, a large, year-round venture called Street Eat’n Mobile Eatery, that aims to please both foodies and those looking for a quick lunch break from work.

“I love street food,” owner Peter Chang said. “We’re street food with bold flavors. We made the food concept a little generic so we could do whatever we want.”

Chang, who has varied experience, from running a group of Greek restaurants in Denver to his own photography and DJing businesses, will run Street Eat’n with his son, Philip.

“The family has always wanted to open a restaurant,” Chang said. “And with a food truck you get that liberty to go broader with flavor and with pricing.”

The menu will rotate, with some staples of global street food always on the menu. One thing for sure: Gyros. Which seems a good time to bring up the kitchen: it’s pretty huge in comparison to many I’ve seen. Equipped with two friers (great for those who are vegetarian), a stove, oven, flat top grill and a Gyros machine, Chang says they’re prepared for any inspiration.

Other regulars, and this I’m really excited for, will be dumplings and possibly ramen. Chang’s says his recipe for dumplings, like many of his recipes, is very authentic and comes from family meals.

“That’s (dumplings) what I lived for as a child,” Chang said.

Only finalization of a city peddler’s license stands between Street Eat’n and being open. And while the truck is insulated, has a generator and the Changs plan to operate the truck year-round, they plan on using this winter as a long-ish soft opening.

Chang says they will be doing events, have talked to some of the places we’ve become used to seeing food trucks at (Wiley’s, outside Avera, outside Wells Fargo, etc.) and plans to be open lunches and late nights.

You can find Street Eat’n on Facebook, at @StreetEatn on Twitter and on Instagram here for a leg up on knowing where and when they’ll be open.

And you can also always count on me to tip you off as well here on Food Falls, or on Twitter @sigepcory.

Quick hits:

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Sep 25, 2014
Tim Lester

Thai Street Food with David Thompson

Episode 1 - Morning, Bangkok awakes

Airs on Thursday 9 October 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

In Bangkok, the people rise well before dawn to prepare food at the market and shop for the day’s ingredients. Host David Thompson walks through the morning market in Petchaburi, talking to stall owners and partaking in the local coffee, roasted in Chang Rai. David also shows us the importance of everyday morning rituals in the form of making merit and leaving offerings at spirit houses. 

 

Episode 2 – Chinatown

Airs on Thursday 16 October 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

Chinatown is one of the key epicentres of street food and where many innovations in Bangkok and Thailand cuisine got started. In this episode, host David Thompson, explores the rich offerings found in the markets, architecture and history. 

 

Episode 3 – What goes around comes around

Airs on Thursday 23 October 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

One of the most sacred and revered aspects in Thai society is the importance of monks. David talks to a monk layperson about what foods are made and received by monks on a regular basis. He joins the monks on their morning rituals and explains the significance of kanom jin noodles.

 

Episode 4 – Communities

Airs on Thursday 30 October 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

Communities are the bedrock of Thai society. They thrive as units and serve society in many different ways. The racial makeup of the people and the skills that they offer enable Bangkok to thrive. 

 

Episode 5 –  Noodles

Airs on Thursday 6 November 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

Chinese noodles are an integral part of any Thai diet and there is a rich tradition that goes along with it. In this episode, host David Thompson explores every aspect of the noodles, including their history, how they are made, what noodles can be served with and an introduction to Pad Thai, one of Thailand’s most famous exportable dishes.

 

Episode 6 –  Lunch

Airs on Thursday 13 November 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

Lunch from 12pm-2pm is one of the most important aspects of the day for busy Thais, who want a great meal but don’t have much time to do so. Hence there are busy markets, which supply a variety of food.

 

Episode 7 –  Curry

Airs on Thursday 20 November 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

Curry houses are everywhere and popular too: Little India, Petchaburi Night Market, Ayutthaya and Silom. “It’s a place where people go to eat,” says David. This sums up the explanation of what curry houses are, but only skims the surface of the sheer varieties of curries and care that goes into making them.

 

Episode 8 –  Desserts

Airs on Thursday 27 November 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

Desserts are considered to be the pinnacle of Thai food. They’re colourful, rich, original and varied in both their presentation and taste. In this episode, David Thompson looks at how they’ve been made in the past and present, as well as how dessert standards are changing.

 

Episode 9 –  Transitions

Airs on Thursday 4 December 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

This episode focuses on transitions: that of day to night, of traditional Bangkok to the modern day city and market transformation in surrounding areas. It’s a compelling and insightful look at how Thailand has changed over the years.

 

Episode 10 –  Seafood

Airs on Thursday 11 December 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

Seafood has been a mainstay of Thai cuisine for many generations. It’s proximity to the water and demand for fish has meant that an entire food industry has thrived in markets and street food dishes for aeons.

 

Episode 11 –  Dtam Sang Stalls

Airs on Thursday 18 December 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

The dtam sang stalls form an integral part of the Thai street food scene. The omnipresent carts are everywhere across the country, designed to offer food with delicious ease. The stalls/carts do form a purpose, though, and David explains the difference between plaeng loy food (food served in pits) and dtam sang food (food cooked to order).

 

Episode 12 –  A big night out

Airs on Thursday 25 December 2014 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

As many know, Bangkok has a thriving nightlife scene. And, much of it is combined with food. It’s called “food you have with drinks”. It’s commonplace to many Thais, yet it’s preparation and many ingredients will come as a surprise for people who don’t know about Thai food culture.

 

Episode 13 –  Modern Bangkok

Airs on Thursday 1 January 2015 at 6pm AEST on SBS ONE.

Street food is an integral part of everyday life, but there’s something else which has attracted crowds, too: mega malls. And with these mega-malls come giant food courts, which offer everything from fast food to street styled food to aspirational shoppers.

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Sep 25, 2014
Tim Lester

First Persian singular: New York chef Louisa Shafia discovers the food of her …

Tell the ayatollah — it’s a new Iranian revolution!

Saffron, cumin, grilled meats and rice have defined Persian cooking in America. But now Brooklyn chef Louisa Shafia wants to change our perception of the food of her heritage.

“Every Persian restaurant in this county basically has the same 20 dishes,” says Shafia, who spent a month traversing Iran in search of those authentic flavors lost in the Americanized Persian restaurants back home. “I wanted to give people some of the dishes they can’t find anywhere else in the United States.”

For now, you can find Shafia and, more important, her cheese-stuffed phyllo triangles, cherry-plum “popsicles” and skewers of lamb liver every Monday night at Porsena Extra Bar in the East Village, where she hosts a Persian street-food popup.

Lamb liver? Don’t knock it — 77 million Iranians can’t be wrong. Indeed, from Tehran to Saravan, there are shops that sell nothing else.

Some of Shafia’s dishes are heavy on meat and spices; others are the kind of things a Persian family might eat for breakfast. Among those is a super-thin lavash bread with a platter of spiced feta cheese, radishes and green herbs.

Louisa Shafia at her Persian pop-up in Porsena Extra BarM.B. Elian for New York Daily News Louisa Shafia at her Persian pop-up in Porsena Extra Bar

Diners rip off a piece of bread, spoon in some cheese and herbs and then roll it up like a mini-burrito. As bar snacks go, it sure beats cheese puffs.

These are the munchies of an empire, bringing together flavors and styles from across Asia and the Middle East. Persian cuisine has existed for 1,500 years, since Cyrus the Great’s traders traveled through the known world, bringing exotic spices back home. Yet the food remains a mystery to the American palate.

“It’s unusual stuff,” said Porsena owner Sara Jenkins. “There is not much Persian food out there, and customers seem really into this opportunity to explore a cuisine we’re not familiar with. We sold out of the lamb liver last night.”

Shafia’s father was born in Iran but left before the revolution of 1979 and hasn’t been back since (just like the American ambassador). His nationality made it extra tough for Shafia to get a visa for her trip — forcing her to become an Iranian citizen just to visit.

Two years of paperwork later, she encountered relatives she had never met, and they made sure she never missed a meal. Outside of Tehran she mostly traveled alone though the countryside, relying on a rudimentary knowledge of Farsi and “the common language of cooking.”

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpiM.B. Elian/for New York Daily News
Louisa Shafia’s sabzi khordan, a mixed herb platter with spiced feta cheese
NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpiM.B. Elian/for New York Daily News
Sambousek, crispy filo stuffed with farmer’s cheese and topped with nigella seeds
NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpiM.B. Elian for New York Daily News
Jigar, lamb liver marinated in basil
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Gheymeh nesar, lamb stew cooked with barberries and pistachios
NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpiM.B. Elian/for New York Daily News
Kalam polo, lamb meatballs with rice and cabbage
  • NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi
  • NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi
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Enlarge

She said the locals she met were thrilled to share their hospitality with a stranger and loved that she had come all the way from New York.

“This is my chance to show people what I learned in Iran,” said Shafia as the crowd began to form at Porsena on a recent Monday night for food they had never heard of but would eat to the last bite.

Persian street food with Louisa Shafia at Porsena Extra Bar, 21 E. Seventh St., between Second and Third Aves., (212) 228-4923; every Monday, 5:30-10 p.m.

jsilverman@nydailynews.com

ON A MOBILE DEVICE? CLICK HERE FOR THE VIDEO.

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Sep 25, 2014
Tim Lester

Oakland street food: The documentary (Part 1)

“Comida Mobile” explores the Latino experience as mirrored in the lives of pushcart vendors in Fruitvale, Oakland.

Born and raised in Oakland, 22-year-old Miguel Montiel operates his family’s fruit cup stand on International Boulevard, often working from 5 a.m. to 5 p.m. For him and his parents, their business is a way to connect with the country his parents left behind.

Parts 2 and 3 of the film are forthcoming.

To learn more about Oakland Local’s initiative on “Street Food: Meet the people who make it” click here. Read the previous installment about the daily life of vendors and the community they’ve cultivated here. Oakland Local staff members Barbara Grady and Simone Larson contributed to this story.

For more stories about Oakland’s street food vendors, follow Oakland Local on Facebook and Twitter. Join the conversation at #foodundocumented.

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