Browsing articles in "street food"
Feb 19, 2015
Tim Lester

Livin’ la vida Tostilocos, a mighty street-food snack

Tostilocos Frito Pie Monterrey Mexico

I must live under a rock, because, until a recent trip to Mexico, I had never heard of Tostilocos. Or Dorilocos. Or Takilocos. Or whatever you call the version of Tostilocos that’s made with Conchitas Encanto corn chips. Maybe Conchitalocos? No, it took a trip to Mexico for me to be enlightened in the ways of this street snack, which is essentially a south-of-the-border version of Frito pie. And I am now forever grateful.

Tostilocos are not a new thing. If you’ve been to Monterrey or Tijuana in the past fifteen years, in fact, you’ve probably passed by a stand or two or twenty selling bags and bags of the stuff to hungry patrons. Chef Adrian Villarreal, of the Spence and the upcoming Rreal Taco, grew up in Monterrey, and recalls seeing them as early as the mid-’80s.

“I first saw Tostilocos, or at least a variation of them, as a young kid,” Villarreal says. “I could walk and buy them at the neighborhood bodega, at school, or in the street outside school. Later in the nineties you started to see a lot of little stores in malls or strip malls that did them and chamoyadas (fruit drinks) as their main business. I don’t even remember if they had a name for them.”

Tostilocos have started gaining attention here in the U.S. in recent years. John T. Edge, the South’s wandering poet of all things delicious, wrote about them in the New York Times three years ago. NPR featured it last year (click on the link and dig that animated gif). I’m willing to bet that somewhere along Buford Highway at this very moment someone is whipping up a bag of Tostilocos. And rightfully so, the stuff is delicious and super simple to throw together.

Tostilocos Frito Pie Monterrey Mexico

So what exactly are Tostilocos? Well, the Tosti part stands for Tostitos (or Doritos, or Takis, or Conchitas), and the locos part stands for all the crazy loco mess o’ stuff you pile on top.

“What is not to like?,” Villarreal says. “They are the perfect vessel for a ton of great tasting ingredients. Who ever came up with them is a genius; cut the bag, mix a ton of tasty stuff, grab a ton of napkins and you are good to go (plastic spoon optional).”

Possible toppings include jicama, pickled pork skins, bright white crumbled queso fresco, industrial-strength liquid queso amarillo (think Cheez Wiz), corn kernels, Japanese peanuts, and more. That said, you can keep them simple, too. Villarreal prefers a classic combo of warm salsa verde and crema drizzled over his corn chips.

Check out these photos to get a good feel for how a bag is thrown together, or watch this near-feature-length video to get a running commentary (in Spanish) from a Monterrey street stand like the one I purchased my bag from last week.

You can find some “recipes” online, but really it’s best to let your imagination run wild. You start with the crunchy corn chips of your choice, pile on something cheesy, something crisp, something spicy. You can balance out the guilt with some slices of cucumber or jicama or pickled carrots or jalapeño. Better yet, lay out a spread of toppings at your next party and let everyone make their own. They’re sure to go loco for Tostilocos.

Villarreal doesn’t often break out a full array of toppings, but his chips are usually are dressed to some extent.

“The most popular is simply mixed with lime and salsa Huichol or Valentina (back in the day it was Buffalo more often). We might use lime and chile Tajín. We are never opposed to mixing with jicama or cucumber or even cueritos (pickled pork skin) when i have some, or mixing in cacahuates Japones (Japanese peanuts).”

If you’d rather try Tostilocos from a pro before tackling them on your own, I’ve heard that there’s a vendor right down Buford Highway at Plaza Fiesta. If you’ve got any other Tostilocos sources in Atlanta, do let us know. And don’t say I didn’t warn you – when you try these, you’re likely to go loco for Tostilocos.

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Feb 18, 2015
Tim Lester

A moveable feast: London street food market comes to Manchester

Manchester’s street food scene will welcome another weekly feast next weekend with the launch of Urban Food Fest.

The night market has been going strong in the London hipster district of Shoreditch since 2013 and is now branching out up north, taking over a car park off Deansgate every Saturday from February 28.

The pop-up event will feature 15 different local traders every week, serving gourmet street food from all over the world: from British pulled pork sliders to Venezuelan arepas, Italian wood-fired pizza, Mexican burritos, Spanish paella, Peruvian choripan and Greek souvlaki.

There will also be plenty of sweet treats, from American red velvet cupcakes and Swiss chocolate brownies to French crepes and Dutch poffertjes, and to wash it all down there will be craft beer from the likes of Manchester microbrewery Shindigger, real ale, cider, wine, prosecco and Fever Tree cocktails.

Diners can sit down to eat and drink together in a communal seating area while listening to live music from a changing line-up of six musicians every week.

Founder Jessica Tucker, who is originally from south Manchester, said: “As soon as we opened the London event I was keen to bring it to my home town of Manchester and we’re super excited about it.

“We’re trying to keep it as local as possible, we want it to be really Manchester-focused with an emphasis on locally-produced, gourmet food.

“The stalls will change every single week so there will always be a different line-up of producers with different dishes to try.

“It’s been a huge hit in Shoreditch, with first class national and international press coverage. We get visitors from around the world and this will be the hottest event in Manchester.”

The event is the latest addition to Manchester’s thriving street food scene, with rivals including B.Eat Street’s Friday Food Fight at the nearby Great Northern Warehouse and the Guerrilla Eats Street Food Party, which has just announced a new 12-week residency at a warehouse in Shudehill.

Urban Food Fest will be held at the Euro Car Parks at 2-6 Bridgewater Street, Deansgate, M3 4LY, from 5pm to midnight every Saturday from February 28. Entry is free.

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Feb 18, 2015
Tim Lester

The Best British Street Food Trends For 2015

Discovering the cheapest, freshest and most authentic native street food has always been a mark of kudos for British travellers abroad. But until a few years ago, international visitors to the UK certainly couldn’t say the same of our own kerbside offerings.

street food truck

Epitomised by football ground burger vans, and city centre hotdog vendors peddling over-processed sausages to half-cut students, British street food was a recipe for food poisoning.

But while our scene was stagnating, across the pond a very different story was unfolding. “The ‘modern street food’ movement started on the west coast of America in about 2004, when catering trucks from LA movie sets were taken onto the streets,” says Charles Banks, co-founder of global food trends agency, thefoodpeople.

“Then along came the recession and many chefs found themselves out of work or unable to afford restaurant rents, and as such took renovated postal trucks onto the streets to provide high quality, no frills food to the people of California.”

But it wasn’t until the trend reached New York on the East Coast that Britain, in the shape of food writer Richard Johnson, picked up the baton.

Inspired by a great tasting burger he ate in a New York park while nursing a hangover with Marco Pierre White – and lamenting the absence of a great street food scene in the UK – Johnson came up with the concept of the British Street Food Awards, aimed at rounding up and showcasing the best of British street food vendors.

And so began the British street food revolution. Starting with pop-up markets in the hippest neighbourhoods of East London, the phenomenon has now spread to many of the country’s major cities – from Manchester and Birmingham to Bristol, Brighton and beyond.

And take Leeds – host to the fifth British Street Food Awards in 2014. Pop-up food markets are quite literally popping up all over town, while at the city’s newest shopping centre, Trinity, five food trucks are hoisted up the side of its building each month as the country’s best street vendors are given the opportunity to peddle their wares alongside the resident restaurateurs of Trinity Kitchen for one month only.

The street food phenomenon gives those with passion and talent, but little capital, the opportunity to make their food business dream a reality. But there are stirrings at the other end of the foodie spectrum, too, with top chefs stepping out from their restaurants and hitting the streets to get in on the action.

Top chef and eponymous owner of Bistrot Bruno Loubet, and his long-standing chef, James Packman have this month taken to the streets of London with Le Swine, a van that promises to bring you the ultimate bacon butty.

So why is everyone wanting a slice of the street food action? What exactly is its appeal?

street food

“Food served in the open air removes so many of the barriers. It acts as a great leveller,” says Petra Barran, founder of Kerb, a membership organisation for some of London’s finest street food cooks. “There you all are on the same bit of kerb, one of you is cooking and serving, the other is eating and paying but you have the same ownership of that space. And the transaction is a very human one – far, far away from the abstractions of the internet or lead times or conference calls.

“It’s back to basics and it makes people feel a part of the city they inhabit – and that’s vital for a city’s mental well-being. Plus it’s damn nice to have the food you’ve ordered be cooked in front of you, just for you. Makes it taste better.”

For Banks it is the immediacy and the intimacy: “There is no time lag with street food, its cooked and served right there in front of you by the vendor, who is probably the owner and creator of the idea which makes street food very personal.”

Adam Layton organiser of Street Feast London, believes it’s as much about the social side of the experience as the food itself. “We see Street Feast as a rival to the pubs and clubs. It’s a festival atmosphere where people come to drink, eat and have a good time with their mates.”

As of Friday 31 January, the Street Feast team will be taking over a new East London location, Haggerston’s Hawker House, for the next ten weekends, where it promises “three floors of street food, music, booze and toasty indoor vibes.”

While the street food scene continues to attract the hipster crowd, Petra sees its future as more than a transient fad.

“What we’re more interested in is that itinerant cooks can continue to serve great food on the streets, that they can have a chance to grow their businesses from the kerb up and that people who love proper, independent food can continue to find it out there on the streets.

“If this is still happening one, two, three years from now then we’ve gone beyond the trend and become an integral part of the city. That’s the goal.”

Banks is similarly optimistic: “The street food revolution will continue to roll, changing the face of food on the high street, in public places, transport hubs, at festivals, concerts and markets.”

He adds: “In 2015 street food will continue to create a unique food experience that is affordable, real, all about the food and a credible alternative to conventional food channels.”

So that’s the direction the food trucks are heading in. But what are they going to be serving over their counters?

“Burgers will continue to be big, but the burger market is already saturated. In fact, the whole ‘meat and wheat’ market is,” says Layton. “What we’re expecting for 2015 are for vendors to ‘think outside the bun’. Asian flavours are set to be big with influences from Japan and Malaysia.”

From Asian steamed buns to Louisiana chicken, here are five street food names to watch for 2015…

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Feb 18, 2015
Tim Lester

Happy Food, a Plentiful New Food Court on Flushing’s Main Street

The good news is that street food has become much more profuse in the last year, via windows, sidewalk stands, and full-blown food courts, so that now there are probably two dozen opportunities to purchase things like curried fish balls on skewers, bowls of congee, vegetable-stuffed bings, pot stickers, and chicken wings as you walk south on Main Street from the 7 train terminus. Newest to arrive is a food court right on the same spot where the Peking duck sandwich disappeared, at the southwest corner of 40th Road and Main Street.

Happy Food exterior.

The English sign sings out Happy Food, though a Mandarin-speaking friend noted that the Chinese name is Big Mouth. It occupies the entire ground floor of the corner building and has a sign outside that proclaims — as if it were a bistro in Bushwick — “Soft Opening,” promising a 20% discount on prices that were not that high to begin with. At the end of the long hall is a seating area with only three trestle tables, and lines of people with their fast-food purchases waiting to sit down. Between the tables and the front door are four activity areas arranged along two parallel counters. Make your selection, pay at one of three registers, and then return to the counter to collect your food.

Right inside the front door on your left is a rather conventional display of Chinese charcuterie, with some gruff butchers whose lovable side never seems to make an appearance. Nevertheless, at the current 20% off, the meat and poultry is a great deal. There are the usual strips of anise-lacquered pork tenderloin, Peking duck, steamed chicken, barbecued geese, sausages, cuttlefish, and the thing I selected for this visit: five very plump chicken wings for the bargain price of $9.71.



Happy Food cold salads, charcuterie, and interior.

Next, moving toward the back, is a long counter with 32 tubs in a steam table. From these you may select three or four dishes for $5.25, which are then served over a mountain of rice with a soup appetizer. You may also select a bowl of warm soy milk in lieu of soup. There are similar deals in all the Chinatowns, but never has been seen such a colorful array of dishes, including chicken in a Malaysian coconut curry, fish heads braised in hot pickled chiles, baby bok choi and half-dozen other vegetable selections, thick slices of soy-braised pork belly, duck-blood stew, and clams with black bean sauce.

Right across the aisle is a station that peddles cold salads, four of which involve chicken feet. There’s also a spicy cabbage slaw; a mock duck that’s one of the best in Flushing, featuring mushrooms wrapped like internal organs inside several layers of tofu skin; pig ears sliced thin; well-oiled cloud ear fungus; gobs of gluten with yellow leeks — you get the picture. Single servings are priced at $2 and $4, assortments somewhat more.

It’s a worthwhile addition to the food scene of the neighborhood, and a place uncommonly accessible to outsiders.

Another long counter features dim sum of every sort, along with congee and crullers, and hot-and-sour soup. There are rice noodle sheets wrapped around shrimp or scented beef, steamed buns filled with pork, siu mai of various sorts, shrimp har gow, and a dozen other types of buns and dumplings, most at $2 per serving and constituting a quick grab-and-go snack for shoppers.

Yes, Happy Food/Big Mouth offers few surprises. But in its selection of pan-Chinese standard street fare, nodding more to the south than the north, and to the evident excitement of the new patrons, it’s a worthwhile addition to the food scene of the neighborhood, and a place uncommonly accessible to outsiders. 40-28 Main Street, (718) 321-1389.

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Feb 18, 2015
Tim Lester

Nue Delivers Tasty Twists on Global Street-Food Favorites

When Chris Cvetkovich announced that he would open a street-food-inspired restaurant, the buzz was palpable. He shared an early working menu with me then, in October—one that he and his chef, Chris Godwin of the Fat Duck in London and The Salish Lodge in Snoqualmie, were still tweaking. I eagerly gobbled it up, writing an excited, likely far-too-early preview for the new place that would be called Nue. Talk of Romanian mititei, Indonesian curry sandwiches, and even some modernist-technique items—like compressed fruit inspired by the ultra-fresh, beautifully cut chilled fruit found on the streets in countries like Malaysia—seemed an exciting antidote to a food writer’s occasional palate fatigue.





More Photos »

By the time I made the trip to the Capitol Hill restaurant a couple weeks ago, I was still hopeful, but also knew that this could get ugly. My biggest concern was that taking dishes from so many places around the world, with so many flavor profiles, could result in a cacophonous assault on the taste buds. But as I discovered, Nue has avoided this potential pitfall—in part by incorporating Asian flavors on almost half of the menu, with a focus on Vietnam, Japan, and Korea. So when Barbadian pig tails or Latvian smoked sprats are thrown into the mix, it’s more a welcome departure than a global war on the tongue.

Also helpful: the relatively small size of the plates (with perfect price points generally in the $7–$12 range). They are, however, easy for two to share generously. You’d be smart to curate your choices and ask to have them brought in an order that makes sense to you. On our first visit, almost everything (five dishes) arrived at once, which is hardly ideal. The second time around we called the shots, and the experience was far better.

Nue’s small interior holds three communal tables and a few seats at a back bar, and the cratelike shelves that make up the main wall—garnished with papier-mâché dragons, cans of Thai fruits and other exotic foodstuffs, bottles of cheap foreign beers, and tattered Lonely Planet guides—give off an Asian food-stall vibe. A large painted mural of a pig and a goat drinking together, labeled respectively as “hungry” and “horny,” are whimsical and kind of out of left field, yet feel at home among the rest of the pitch-perfect kitsch.

However, there’s nothing kitschy about the food. The big flavors found here are spot-on, and their balance, as well as the textures, are actually quite complex, in the way that the best street food can be. A bite of the chunky Japanese yakitori chicken thigh—grilled, bone-in (no street-style skewer)—encompasses the sweet teriyaki-style sauce, the “kewpie” mayo (a creamy Japanese mayo made with rice vinegar instead of distilled vinegar), the thin strips of nori, and the julienned pickled ginger, and is one of the most beguiling I’ve had in a very long time. (It’s also my 7-year-old daughter’s favorite dish.) South African bunny chow comes served atop lightly toasted slices of Pullman bread that hold up under the heaping mound of shredded chicken breast cooked with Indian masala, lime, and cilantro. The meat yields an almost stew-like affect that in some wondrous way manages to taste like both curry and barbecue. Ripping at the bread with your fingers and using it to “spoon” up the meat certainly screams messy, on-the-fly street food.

The grilled jerk pig tails, unfortunately, were almost all fat. The waitress (who happens to be the owner’s wife) told us that fat content varies wildly from pig to pig. I believe her, but there needs to be a check in place to make sure that they’re not serving ones as inedible as ours. Spicy Korean jumbo chicken wings really were gigantic; they ask for the largest possible, apparently. More important, though, they’re glazed with garlic, ginger, sesame, scallion, and a spicy gojujang (a Korean fermented soybean, red chili, and rice sauce) that brings delightful heat and requires wet-wipes to clean your hands after eating, as well they should. I can’t decide if these or the tasty ones at Tray Kitchen are superior. I’ll keep eating both until I reach a verdict, which could take, you know, forever.

We cooled it all down with a composed Vietnamese spinach herb salad, which, while not resembling street food, reminded me of those papaya/peanut/fish sauce salads in a cup you get on the street in Vietnam and Thailand. There isn’t any papaya, but the leaves are dressed with shiso, basil, peanuts, nuoc cham dressing, candied shrimp, sawtooth (similar to cilantro), and rau ram (Vietnamese coriander). It isn’t spicy, but the intersection of all of those ingredients, surprisingly, works—the pungent tempered with the subtle. It’s a haiku of a dish, straightforward yet mysterious.

Speaking of all those herbs and sauces, it’s commendable how Nue really takes the time to source authentic, harder-to-find ingredients. It makes reading the menu challenging, but the staff is more than happy to answer any questions.

A prawn laksa, a spicy noodle soup found mostly in Malaysia, is given a southern Indian spin via a thicker peanut and coconut curry treatment, but the galangal (think ginger and eucalyptus), sambal (a vinegary chili-based sauce with notes of fish and shrimp paste), and duan kesom (Vietnamese mint) keep it true to its origins.

Romanian mititei was fine if not memorable, the grilled pork sausages enlivened by two dipping sauces: a horseradish mustard and ajvar, made from smoky eggplant and red peppers. Most impressive on this plate were the pickles, which achieve a cooling, milder bite than your average pickle while managing not to taste like an underbrined cucumber. I’d buy these by the jar. Likewise, the Indian spinach pakora were entirely reputable, though not what I’d seek here. However, their ability to keep the chickpea filling moist deserves mention.

After two visits, I have yet to explore Trinidad (goat curry), Latvia (sprats), the Caribbean (the cubano sandwich) or Hungary (paprikash), though of course I have every intention to. I’ve also tried Nue’s single dessert item—liquid-nitrogen ice cream, a nod to their love of Modernist cuisine—only once, but found the infusion of shiso honey rather lackluster. Had it not been dinner, I would have gone for the Vietnamese-coffee version. (They plan to change up flavors regularly.)

Finally, while I’ve grown weary of imbibing and describing six-ingredient craft cocktails, Nue surprised me with a drink menu worth mentioning. On a whim, I ordered the “Little Diddy ’bout Jack and Siam” (cue cheesy laugh track), curious about a cocktail described as “chilled Chardonnay, jackfruit, Thai chili, basil.” I’m a fan of jackfruit’s earthy, soapy, ever-so-slightly-sweet, pineapple-gone-bad flavor. It’s definitely what you’d call an acquired taste, but it’s not in fact related to the stinky durian that it resembles. In this preparation, several chunks of the meaty fruit, soaked in alcohol for hours, float in a slightly sweet chardonnay and get a spicy blast from the chili pepper and an herbal note from the basil.

I fell in love with this inimitable drink. I had two, and talked about it to whomever would listen the following week. Throughout the day before my second visit, I spent more than a few minutes fantasizing about it. Then, crushingly, they told me they were out. I think I gasped. The server explained that they hadn’t soaked the jackfruit in time, which I’ll chalk up to new opening kinks rather than laziness. Apparently, other customers also asked for it that night, which I hope bodes well for this unusual but bewitching cocktail.

With or without it, Nue, with its shabby charm and killer food, is going to be just fine—as long as they continue to surprise us with their unique takes on favorite street fare and execute them as well as they have to date. Street food is in danger of becoming a cliché, it’s true, but this exciting new restaurant reminds us why it’s so utterly addictive.

nsprinkle@seattleweekly.com

NUE 1519 Fourth Ave., 257-0312, nueseattle.com. Noon–10 p.m. Tues.–Wed.; noon–11 p.m. Thurs.–Sat.; 11 a.m.–9 p.m. Sun.

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Feb 18, 2015
Tim Lester

Getting the lard out of my street food

Gourmet Tamales

3616 Ocean Ranch Boulevard, Oceanside

America’s finest farmers’ market foodies love tamales.

I’m often fascinated by questions of authenticity when it comes to street food. Like, the way some guys will set their jaw and argue against quality in favor of traditionally greasy, cheap and eaten-standing-up snacks. Literally arguing that you can make something worse by using better quality ingredients, and by eating it out of context.

I do it too, with some degree of sentimentality. Bacon-wrapped hot dogs? Best when they cost two bucks each off a street cart after watching a live sporting event. Street tacos? Greatest off a truck for a buck apiece when I’ve recently surfed. Tamales? Well, there are a number of places I’d like to eat a tamale, and however insufferable a foodie I may be, it’s pretty unlikely one of them would ever be at a farmers’ market.

Cue Gourmet Tamales. I don’t know why I’d gravitate to tamales at a farmers’ market. All around are fresh greens and ripe fruit, pressed oils and live sea urchin. Why would I fill my sack with beautiful, healthy, locally grown produce then turn around and eat stewed meat wrapped in steamed masa and a corn husk? Just a sickness I suppose, but I will not be cured. I will clench my fist and insist tamales are not merely welcome but integral to the San Diego farmers’ market experience.

Good luck choosing from all this.

But gourmet? Come on, we’re still talking about tamales, right? The stuff served wrapped in foil by metal push carts all over the Southland? Of course we are, but we’re also talking about the Mercato, Little Italy. Catt White doesn’t keep bad vendors around in her Saturday Market, one of the reasons its such a favorite stop for loving couples parading their togetherness, and East Coast transplants with family visiting for the first time. And self-described foodies like me.

I filled my shopping bag with great ingredients and was drawn like a moth to the Gourmet Tamales booth. “No Lard,” its sign says, which might get a rise out of the staunch traditionalist. “Gluten Free,” it says. Okay, now that’s just unnecessary.

The key to the greatness of Gourmet Tamales is the variety. It’s got vegetarian options including spinach, feta and tomatillo; or black beans and roasted jalapeño. It’s got vegan options including sweet corn and scallions; and green mole with vegetables. Hell, it’s even got dessert tamales, including orange mango and pumpkin spice.

They each run $3.50 each, cash only. Yes, you can get packs of three frozen for 8 bucks apiece, but all must be the same flavor, and with 24 to choose from this somehow seems like a worse deal.

Of course, I went for the meat menu, because I needed to see these stack up against my lardy favorites — shredded beef with chipotle, and pork loin with roasted green chiles. They were delightful. The masa may not have been as rich or creamy as it would have been with lard, but I found myself willing to make this tradeoff, especially with the tasty meats and peppers giving me some spice to work with. I wish they were cheaper, and I wish I could try all of them, but I also wish I had a few more in my freezer right now. Guilt-free tamales. Who’d have thought?

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Feb 17, 2015
Tim Lester

Yiro Yiro becoming a household name for Greek street food

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Feb 17, 2015
Tim Lester

Manly food scene gets Harry Phat’s and Just Desserts with the Boathouse and …

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Feb 17, 2015
Tim Lester

Greek street food finally gets a foothold in Sydney thanks to the humble yiros

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