Browsing articles in "street food"
Jun 28, 2014
Tim Lester

The Giants’ Edible Garden; SF Street Food Festival Might Be Ending; Inside …

BERNAL HEIGHTS—Bernal is getting along swimmingly with new seafood spot Red Hill Station, which will also double as a built-in seafood market. Take a tour.

SAN FRANCISCO—Shaved ice, snow cones, and Italian ice: our map helps you find cool treats that are just the thing for a summertime snack.

SOMA—Congrats to Johnny Ortiz, Saison’s sous chef, who took home an Eater Young Guns award this week. At just 23, he was the youngest of the 50 semifinalists.

SOMA—As prognosticated, the end has come for the Chron‘s standalone food section: as of this weekend, it’s being combined with their home and garden coverage into a new section called Food+Home.

SOMA—Loretta Keller’s Coco500 is shutting down on July 9th and becoming the new home of Marlowe, which is being forced out by construction.

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Jun 28, 2014
Tim Lester

Hop a flight to Beijing before its street food scene disappears

The streets just south of Beijing’s Tiananmen Square are an incongruous mix. Qianmen Street, which shoots straight south from Mao’s Mausoleum and the Great Hall of the People, is a long-standing pedestrian thoroughfare lined with storefronts, now including a Häagen-Dazs ice cream shop and a Zara clothing store. The street’s 500-year-old look was refurbished in time for the city’s 2008 Olympics.

But turn off of Qianmen, and a visitor steps back into a more ancient and gritty Beijing. On Men Kuang Hutong, tiny mom-and-pop stands sell rou jia mo, a delicious sandwich of slow-cooked pork and cilantro nestled in pocket bread. Other restaurants tout their homemade baijiu, an esophagus-burning rice wine, and hot pot served from copper vessels.

As you wind your way further through the hutongs—the narrow alleyways that once made up almost all of Beijing—you reach Lazhu Hutong, where Muslim restaurateurs rush around to serve guests at tables set up in the street. It’s one of Beijing’s best-kept secrets. Lamb and duck, along with onions and cilantro, are marinated in the spices of the Silk Road—cumin, chili, salt, pepper, cardamom, turmeric. Diners cook up their own meals on a cast-iron griddle set over a bucket of scorching hot coals on each table.

These alleys—where diners spend hours chatting, smoking, drinking, and eating at tiny outdoor tables—are diminishing. Beijing is transitioning from a city of grease-smudged kitchens to one of high-rise malls packed with boutiques and Sichuan-fusion cuisine joints. Since the 1990s, the city has demolished hundreds of these old neighborhoods.

For now, though, smoke still pours into the sky from the street-food alleys, and Chinese mix with westerners keen to experience the “real” Beijing.

In the northeast area of the city, not far from one of Beijing’s most beautiful temples, Yonghegong, there sits a tiny alley called Beixinqiao San Tiao, the third hutong up from Guijie, or Ghost Street. Here you’ll find one of the few remaining lamb-leg streets, where diners choose an entire leg of lamb or mutton and grill it themselves on a rotisserie slung over a charcoal pit, again set on individual tables.

“There were once 30 alleys, at a minimum” that sold grilled lamb legs “before the city started clearing out the hutongs and began taking them down in 2001,” says Adam Gottschalk, a local beer and bourbon importer who leads food-centered walking tours for The Hutong, a Beijing cultural center. “Now there are two left.”

Other Asian cities, such as Tokyo and Hong Kong, have managed to keep lively outdoor eating areas alongside swankier development, says Colin Chinnery, a Beijing artist and curator whose Chinese grandparents owned a siheyuan—a courtyard home on a hutong—just east of the Forbidden City. But Beijing seems to be promoting a more posh lifestyle, he says. “As people’s cost of living and wages go up, their standard of living goes up,” Chinnery says. “It’s kind of understandable that people want to go to more upscale places.”

There’s another factor hastening the decline of street restaurants, he notes. “If you have modernization and you see that the urban environment needs to be cleaned, then you understand that the hygienic condition of these restaurants leaves something to be desired. People are more careful where their food comes from, and they want to know what they’re eating,” he says.

The Beijing government dealt a further blow to street-barbecue restaurants by announcing a ban on grilling earlier this year, arguing that it contributed to Beijing’s notorious air pollution. The ban really hasn’t stopped people from grilling outdoors, even though the government has warned it will photograph violators at night and give them warnings during the day.

The rule makes no sense, says Ricky Wang, a local beer salesman who grew up in Beijing. “It’s part of Beijing’s people’s lives. Sometimes, we want to drink a beer and have outdoor barbecue.” Besides, he says, it’s a big city. It’s impossible to enforce the ban everywhere.

Back on crowded Lazhu Hutong, barbecued lamb seems more popular than ever. It takes some maneuvering for us to nab a tiny table and a few low stools. An elfin man lugs a kettle filled with hot briquettes, which he plops into an indentation in the center of the table. The heat pours off the coals. Another waiter lays a cast-iron griddle on top of the kettle and we place portions of lamb, duck, and onions on top. We also order fermented tofu, riddled with blue veins like a sort of fancy cheese, which we smear like butter across fried bread. Dinner for three—including three large beers—is 119 yuan, or $19. There are no other westerners in sight.

Meanwhile, on Beixinqiao San Tiao, the young expats are almost equal in number to the Chinese slowly turning lamb legs over charcoal pits. As the leg cooks, diners use a long knife and fork to slice off chunks of lamb and continue grilling them on the rack below. As the fat drips down, the fire flares up. When the lamb is cooked, diners grab a piece or two with chopsticks, wrap it up in a wide lettuce leaf and add chopped nuts and a fermented chili bean sauce. Motorcycles roar through the lane, smoke billowing into the sky.

It may be that the last truly loyal customers of Beijing’s dying street-dining scene are foreigners. “I occasionally go to the hutongs, and it’s always to meet a western friend,” says Colin Chinnery.

These streets are “awesome” right now, says Adam Gottschalk—but in two years, they could well be gone. “Meanwhile,” he says, “I’m always thinking of that famous quote from Yogi Berra: ‘Nobody goes there anymore; it’s too crowded.’”

This post originally appeared at CityLab. More from our sister site: 

The pernicious realities of ‘artwashing’

Why can’t we build skinny skyscrapers everywhere?

Why public transit is not living up to its social contract

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Jun 27, 2014
Tim Lester

Beijing’s Famed Street-Food Scene Struggles to Survive

The streets just south of Beijing’s Tiananmen Square are an incongruous mix. Qianmen Street, which shoots straight south from Mao’s Mausoleum and the Great Hall of the People, is a long-standing pedestrian thoroughfare lined with storefronts, now including a Häagen-Dazs ice cream shop and a Zara clothing store. The street’s 500-year-old look was refurbished in time for the city’s 2008 Olympics.

But turn off of Qianmen, and a visitor steps back into a more ancient and gritty Beijing. On Men Kuang Hutong, tiny mom-and-pop stands sell rou jia mo, a delicious sandwich of slow-cooked pork and cilantro nestled in pocket bread. Other restaurants tout their homemade baijiu, an esophagus-burning rice wine, and hot pot served from copper vessels.

As you wind your way further through the hutongs—the narrow alleyways that once made up almost all of Beijing—you reach Lazhu Hutong, where Muslim restaurateurs rush around to serve guests at tables set up in the street. It’s one of Beijing’s best-kept secrets. Lamb and duck, along with onions and cilantro, are marinated in the spices of the Silk Road—cumin, chili, salt, pepper, cardamom, turmeric. Diners cook up their own meals on a cast-iron griddle set over a bucket of scorching hot coals on each table.  

These alleys—where diners spend hours chatting, smoking, drinking, and eating at tiny outdoor tables—are diminishing. Beijing is transitioning from a city of grease-smudged kitchens to one of high-rise malls packed with boutiques and Sichuan-fusion cuisine joints. Since the 1990s, the city has demolished hundreds of these old neighborhoods.

For now, though, smoke still pours into the sky from the street-food alleys, and Chinese mix with westerners keen to experience the “real” Beijing.

In the northeast area of the city, not far from one of Beijing’s most beautiful temples, Yonghegong, there sits a tiny alley called Beixinqiao San Tiao, the third hutong up from Guijie, or Ghost Street. Here you’ll find one of the few remaining lamb-leg streets, where diners choose an entire leg of lamb or mutton and grill it themselves on a rotisserie slung over a charcoal pit, again set on individual tables.

“There were once 30 alleys, at a minimum” that sold grilled lamb legs “before the city started clearing out the hutongs and began taking them down in 2001,” says Adam Gottschalk, a local beer and bourbon importer who leads food-centered walking tours for The Hutong, a Beijing cultural center. “Now there are two left.”

Other Asian cities, such as Tokyo and Hong Kong, have managed to keep lively outdoor eating areas alongside swankier development, says Colin Chinnery, a Beijing artist and curator whose Chinese grandparents owned a siheyuan—a courtyard home on a hutong—just east of the Forbidden City. But Beijing seems to be promoting a more posh lifestyle, he says. “As people’s cost of living and wages go up, their standard of living goes up,” Chinnery says. “It’s kind of understandable that people want to go to more upscale places.”

There’s another factor hastening the decline of street restaurants, he notes. “If you have modernization and you see that the urban environment needs to be cleaned, then you understand that the hygienic condition of these restaurants leaves something to be desired. People are more careful where their food comes from, and they want to know what they’re eating,” he says.

The Beijing government dealt a further blow to street-barbecue restaurants by announcing a ban on grilling earlier this year, arguing that it contributed to Beijing’s notorious air pollution. The ban really hasn’t stopped people from grilling outdoors, even though the government has warned it will photograph violators at night and give them warnings during the day.

The rule makes no sense, says Ricky Wang, a local beer salesman who grew up in Beijing. “It’s part of Beijing’s people’s lives. Sometimes, we want to drink a beer and have outdoor barbecue.” Besides, he says, it’s a big city. It’s impossible to enforce the ban everywhere.

Back on crowded Lazhu Hutong, barbecued lamb seems more popular than ever. It takes some maneuvering for us to nab a tiny table and a few low stools. An elfin man lugs a kettle filled with hot briquettes, which he plops into an indentation in the center of the table. The heat pours off the coals. Another waiter lays a cast-iron griddle on top of the kettle and we place portions of lamb, duck, and onions on top. We also order fermented tofu, riddled with blue veins like a sort of fancy cheese, which we smear like butter across fried bread. Dinner for three—including three large beers—is 119 yuan, or $19. There are no other westerners in sight.


A lamb leg grills over coals at an alleyway hutong eatery in the bustling Beixinqiao San Tiao alley. (Debra Bruno)

Meanwhile, on Beixinqiao San Tiao, the young expats are almost equal in number to the Chinese slowly turning lamb legs over charcoal pits. As the leg cooks, diners use a long knife and fork to slice off chunks of lamb and continue grilling them on the rack below. As the fat drips down, the fire flares up. When the lamb is cooked, diners grab a piece or two with chopsticks, wrap it up in a wide lettuce leaf and add chopped nuts and a fermented chili bean sauce. Motorcycles roar through the lane, smoke billowing into the sky.

It may be that the last truly loyal customers of Beijing’s dying street-dining scene are foreigners. “I occasionally go to the hutongs, and it’s always to meet a western friend,” says Colin Chinnery.

These streets are “awesome” right now, says Adam Gottschalk—but in two years, they could well be gone. “Meanwhile,” he says, “I’m always thinking of that famous quote from Yogi Berra: ‘Nobody goes there anymore; it’s too crowded.’”

 

Recommended Reading

Jun 27, 2014
Tim Lester

LA Street Food Fest, Tavern’s Low Country Boil, and More!

Tenth Anniversary Dinner at Cliff’s Edge — 6/26
Ten years in the restaurant business is nothing to sneeze at. To celebrate the accomplishment, Silver Lake’s Cliff’s Edge has invited a start-studded crew of guest chefs such as Nancy Silverton (Mozza) and Walter Manzke (Republique) as well as mixologist Matthew Biancaniello to collaborate on a 10-course dinner with resident toque Vartan Abgaryan. This event not only benefits your taste buds but also the community—a portion of the proceeds will go to Micheltorena Elementary School’s edible garden. Lucky you if you managed to score one of the $125 tickets. Rumor has it the event is sold out. More information.

Nancy Silverton and Suzanne Tracht in the Chandelier Room — 6/28
And they’re off! Chefs Christian Page, Nancy Silverton (Mozza), and Suzanne Tracht (Jar) are joining forces at Santa Anita Park’s Chandelier Room to cook up some seriously tasty daytime bites for the Gold Cup stakes race. More information.

Fifth Annual L.A. Street Food Fest — 6/28
With more than 100 vendors, including food trucks, carts, celebrity chefs, restaurants, beer, cocktails, wine, an ice cream social, and an iced coffee lounge—all for $55—we know how we’re spending our weekend. Participants include the Grilled Cheese Truck, Kraken Mobile, Aloha Plate, Bizarra Capital, and Sticky Rice, as well as Tacos Kokopelli and Aqui es Texcoco from Baja, Mexico. Bring your stretchy pants and come hungry. More information.

LA Weekly presents Tacolandia — 6/28
Tacos may be ubiquitous in L.A., but they’re also exceptionally diverse. Sample versions from more than 40 local and Mexican taco slingers during the second annual event, curated by our own Digest blogger, Bill Esparza. Pros like the Food Network’s Simon Majumdar, “Ask A Mexican” columnist Gustavo Arellano, and critic Besha Rodell will judge the offerings to select the city’s best taco. You can experience all this plus live music, tequila tastings, and more for $30. More information.

Art Beyond the Glass — 6/29
The third annual charity cocktail event features an expanded lineup of bartenders from across the city, such as Julian Cox and Josh Goldman (Soigné Group) and Karen Grill (Bestia). The mixologists will be creating drinks while showcasing their own artistic endeavors (think: paintings, sculptures, music) all for the benefit of the Mural Conservancy of Los Angeles. More information.

Tavern’s “Low Country Boil” — 6/29
A taste of the south comes to Los Angeles as Tavern’s Suzanne Goin and Caroline Styne, together with chef de cuisine Amy Deaderick, honor the Low Country Boil—a delicious regional tradition from the coastal areas of the Carolinas. The feast features crawfish, crab legs, Andouille sausage, potatoes, and sweet corn—all served on newspaper-covered tables for $55. More information.

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Jun 27, 2014
Tim Lester

Six Reasons to Queue Up at the LA Street Food Fest

Food festivals can be overwhelming. With more than 60 vendors (that’s not even counting the “Ice Cream Social” folks), the L.A. Street Food Fest is no exception. To make the most of our money and our sacred stomach space, we’re going by contributor Jason Kessler’s food fest guidelines. His first rule? Identify your targets.

With that in mind, here are six L.A. Street Food Fest bites we think are worth waiting in line for:

WHAT: Porchetta (a savory, fatty and moist Italian roast pork) and salsa verde from Union’s Bruce Kalman.
WHY: This dish perfectly combines flavors from the two regions (Northern Italy and the California coast) that were the inspiration for Kalman’s buzzy new Italian restaurant in Pasadena.

WHAT: Mini truffle burgers from VaKa Burger.
WHY: Recently voted as the best burger in SoCal, we can attest this caramelized onion and provolone-topped slider lives up to the title. Its truck attracts long lines daily for a reason. 

WHAT: A chorizo gravy and quail egg-topped biscuit from Picnik’s Eduardo Ruiz.
WHY: You probably skipped breakfast to save space for the big day. Make it up here—given Picnik’s sausage-centric menu, we’re sure Ruiz knows his way around chorizo.

WHAT: Cheesy Ranch “Wachos” (waffle fry nachos) from the Los Lobos Truck.
WHY: Do you really need another reason to eat cheesy fried potatoes in waffle form? Fine. They’ve even been trademarked.

WHAT: Alcoholic oysters by Matthew Biancaniello (representing Cliff’s Edge).
WHY: The mixologist’s signature passion fruit, mezcal and sriracha-infused mollusks are perfect for a post-Wacho—and pre-dessert—palate cleanser.

WHAT: And finally, for dessert: the internet-viral churro ice cream sandwich from Churro Borough.
WHY: We had thought cinnamon-sugar fried dough couldn’t get any better—turns out we just hadn’t stuffed it with panna cotta ice cream. This is easily the buzziest bite at the fest this year, so grab a plate or two to tide you over while waiting in line. 

P.S. If you still have room (how?!), don’t fret: there are Korean BBQ brisket tostadas (Formosa Café), ceviche and aguachile (Coni’s Seafood), cheesy mac and ribs (Grilled Cheese Truck), sweet and sour rib-eye beef (Starry Kitchen) and lots, lots more to be had.

 

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Jun 27, 2014
Tim Lester

Ten Things to Try at This Year’s Street Food Fest

140625-del-rey-deli.jpgDel Rey Deli
The little sandwich shop that could, way out in Playa Del Rey, has been gaining steam of late, making the rounds at a few different food festivals this year. Just don’t expect much of Del Rey Deli‘s awesome chorizo: their in-house choriman is slinging at Tacolandia across town instead.

140625-el-coraloense-exterior.JPGEl Coraloense
This year’s Taco Madness winner won’t be at Tacolandia downtown, they’ll be slinging ceviches at the LA Street Food Festival. The cooled-down mariscos plates from El Coraloense should help ward off some of that Pasadena summer heat, too.

140625-starry-kitchen-nguyen-tran.jpgStarry Kitchen
Food festival mainstays Nguyen and Thi Tran’s Starry Kitchen has been culture-jamming the food scene in LA for years. A stop for their over-the-top fried “balls” is worth it alone, but Tran’s ridiculous outfits and matching personality put the whole thing over the top.

140625-chicken-rice-truck.jpg
Chicken Rice
While the lines have largely died down at this Hollywood late night halal cart, especially now that they’ve got an out-of-the-way brick and mortar, Chicken Rice is still slinging up tasty bowls of grilled chicken over their signature orange rice. With plenty of red and white sauce, of course.

140625-brian-huskey-formosa.pngFormosa Cafe
If you missed chef Brian Huskey’s fried chicken sandwich at last weekend’s DTLA Night Market, there’s a good chance you’ll find it here. Laced with a sweet potato puree, it’s a funky mix that represents Huskey’s new menu at Formosa Cafe.

Screen%20Shot%202014-06-09%20at%203.37.28%20PM.jpgPicnik
A relative newcomer, Pasadena’s Picnik is jumping into the LA Street Food Fest with their popular sausages. The shop, which is helmed by Eduardo Ruiz of Corazon Y Miel, also slings ceviche from a small space inside their Pasadena location, so there’s a good chance the menu is a mix of both sausages and seafood.

bepvietnameseeater.jpegBEP Vietnamese
Connie Tran’s longtime pop-up BEP Vietnamese will be on hand, slinging the sort of Southern Vietnamese specialties — often seafood-centric — that she’s become well known for.

140625-donut-friend.JPGDonut Friend
Doughnuts are as captivating as ever, and Highland Park’s Donut Friend has been the talk of them all of late, using original recipes, unusual mash-ups and a ‘build your own” model to create truly unique sweets.

140625-your-little-local-coffee.JPGYour Little Local
This 1954 vintage camper is possibly the most Instagram-worthy part of the whole festival (minus the food). Your Little Local is a mobile event space / bar that also pops up as a standalone coffee operation occasionally, using beans from Vittoria Coffee, an Australian export.

140625-harlowe-interior.jpgHarlowe
The recent West Hollywood bar Harlowe already does well with their pre-measured Sazeracs and on tap Old Fashioned, so expect the inevitable long line inside the VIP tent to move pretty briskly. —Farley Elliott

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Jun 26, 2014
Tim Lester

A street food festival

Be it oil dripping vadas or spongy vada pavs or crispy dosas, street food is always an enticing option for gourmands. Tuck into the street cuisine of The Gateway Hotel.

Colourful lights, a cycle, cinema posters of Maan Karate and Vallavanukku Pullum Ayudham … create a perfect ambience at the Khau Galli festival at The Gateway Hotel. “It would be more fitting to call it Madurai Theruvora Sappatu Thiruvizha,” says V. John Praveen, Executive Chef. “We wanted to kindle nostalgia and have reintroduced some forgotten recipes and masalas,” he says.

“Have you heard of ‘Marathi Mokku’ or ‘Kalpasi’?” he asks. “In the name of sophistication we have lost good number of traditional spices and recipes which are also healthy,” says John Praveen.

‘Kozhi Milagu Soup’ and ‘Paruppu Malli Chaaru’ kicks off the culinary journey. Though not too elaborate, the buffet table serves the ‘Virudhunagar Kozhi Biryani’ and ‘Chettinadu Muttai Roast’ to woo the non vegetarians. The muttai roast is easily the dish of the day prepared in Chettinad style with onions, ginger garlic paste, tomatoes and garam masala.

Vegetarians enjoy the ‘Masala pulao’, ‘Thakkali Sadham’, ‘Lemon Sevai’ and ‘Podi Idli’ to go with ‘Urulai Pal curry’ and ‘Kaikari Milagu Masala’.

There are live counters that serve freshly fried vadas, pakodas and vada pavs. “Since it is street food we have concentrated more on these live counters. Memories of long walks with parents down streets eating this kind of food are still green my mind. We have tried to bring those experiences back with these counters,” says John Praveen.

The vada kadai has medhu vadai, keerai vadai, paruppu vadai and kariveppilai vadai with another station making egg bonda and bread pakodas. The ‘Veechu Parotta’ counter serves parottas stuffed with vegetables and chicken and is bustling with diners.

There is a chaat counter, too, where paani poori, bhel poori, poori kachori, aloo masaladar.

There is the unusual dal station where guests are encouraged to prepare their own dish with a choice of boiled rajma, toor and hara moong dal.

‘Vazhai Then Amirdham’ with a consistency of a payasam and the local delicacy jigarthanda make up the dessert section. ‘Sukku Kaapi’ is also a part of the feast. For those who are usually hesitant to eat street food, this is a perfect opportunity to try out the same in hygienic surroundings. Khau Gali is open on Fridays and Saturdays from 7.30 p.m.

“We have planned to extend this festival for two months depending upon the business,” says John Praveen.

The aromatic vegetarian and non vegetarian fare comes at an all inclusive price of Rs.799. For reservation call 6633001.

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Jun 26, 2014
Tim Lester

Tequila Tent at LA Street Food Fest

Heads up, this year’s cocktail participants at L.A. Street Food Fest’s Summer Tasting Event in the Rose Bowl are going to be stellar. It’s just the thing to quench your thirst after noshing on the best of what the L.A. street food scene has to offer. How do I know? I picked the bars myself. For the second year in a row the LASFF organizers tasked me with curating the cocktail bar selections at the annual summer food fest. And to make sure they’re up to the standards of your discerning palates, I did a lot of research and many grueling tasting sessions. Ahem, many.

But I’ve narrowed it down to some of the best cocktail hotspots which will fit in with the summery festival nicely: 1886, Harlowe, and Petty Cash. Here’s what they’ll be serving up. (Church Key and Melrose Umbrella Co. will be there, too, but are keeping their cocktail deets up their sleeves.)

During the festival’s VIP session, new West Hollywood bar Harlowe will serve up a bottled cocktail, a “fun carbonated tequila beverage.” Afterwards for general admission they’ll have their “Captain Planet,” a cocktail on the current menu made with Bols Genever, house-made spiced watermelon strawberry shrub, lemon juice, and “effervescence”.

Petty Cash is bringing the perfect thirst quencher for the hot day: Petty Cash Margarita made with Ocho Tequila and kegs of its Brixton cocktail which at the restaurant is made with gin, poblano sorbet, habanero, lime, and flaming Green Chartreuse on top. But I wonder how they’ll replicate that flaming chartreuse.

Pasadena’s own 1886 will have the Queen’s Park Swizzle, a refreshing rum cocktail that’s similar to a Mojito with rum, lime, simple syrup, mint and Angostura bitters.

If craft cocktails aren’t your jam, the Tequila Tasting Tent returns to the Bowl and there will also be beer from local breweries Angel City and Golden Road as well as Stella Artois, Kronenbourg, and Singha.

For coffee lovers, the summer event debuts a new Iced Coffee Lounge featuring frosty brews from the likes of Cognoscenti Coffee, Copa Vida, plus the debut of Angels Gate Roasting from San Pedro.

Stay hydrated!

Tickets are $55 for general admission and $80 for VIP (early entry)

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Jun 26, 2014
Tim Lester

Tacolandia, Homemade Brew & Food Festival, L.A. Street Food Fest and more …



More than 40 taco vendors are expected to participate in the second annual Tacolandia, a celebration of the yummy-filled tortillas that have become a staple street food of Los Angeles.

Soho Taco, which makes every tortilla from scratch and even has gluten-free tacos, plans to serve one of its specialty tacos that consist of marinated shrimp, grilled with garlic butter and topped with cabbage, cheese and chipotle sour cream.

Another vendor to make an appearance at the event is Carnitas El Momo, who was awarded “Best in Show” at Groupon’s Taco Madness event earlier this year. Carnitas El Momo has been around for 41 years serving savory carnitas, which are often raved about on Yelp.

There will also be food demonstrations, a tequila garden and La Tortilla Factory will be giving out free packages of handmade white corn tortillas to the first 1,500 attendees who visit its booth.

Tacolandia: 3-7 p.m. June 28. Minimum age 21. Tickets $30; $50 includes VIP gift bag and five drink tickets; $20 for tequila garden (does not include admission to event). El Pueblo de Los Angeles, 125 Paseo de la Plaza, Los Angeles. www.ticketfly.com/purchase/event/554827

Los Angeles, San Fernando Valley and Santa Monica area

Classes

Cook LA: Cuban Menu, 6:45 p.m. June 26 ($75); Italian Menu Favorites, 6 p.m. June 28 ($75); Healthy Summer Menu, 5:30 p.m. June 29 ($70); Grilling 101, 6 p.m. July 5 ($75); Healthy Armenian Menu: Nancy Mehagian introduces recipes from her book “Siren’s Feast — An Edible Odyssey” and signs the book, 7 p.m. July 11 ($75); Knife Skills, 5:30 p.m. July 13 ($75); Girls Night Out, 7 p.m. July 18 ($75); Tapas from Around the World, 6 p.m. July 19 ($75); Artisan Bread, 10:30 a.m. July 20 ($75); Thai Menu, 6 p.m. July 26 ($65); Indian Menu, 6:45 p.m. July 31 ($75). Reservations required. 10938 Ventura Blvd., Studio City. 818-760-5157. www.cooklaonline.com

Chez Cherie Cooking School: Thrill of the Grill, 6:30 p.m. June 24-25 ($70); Saveur Cooks: American Classics, 6:30 p.m. July 1 ($75); Fresh Asian Flavors, 6:30 p.m. July 8 ($65); Summer Farmer’s Market Finds, 6:30 p.m. July 15 ($65); Flavors of the Mediterranean, 6:30 p.m. July 22 ($75); Cookbook Cooking, 6:30 p.m. July 29 ($65). Reservations required. 1401 Foothill Blvd., La Canada Flintridge. 818-952-7217. www.chezcherie.com

Let’s Get Cookin’: Moroccan Menu, 6:30 p.m. June 24 ($85; $160 couples); Steve Raichlen: Man Made Meals demonstration, tasting and book signing, 6:30 p.m. June 25 ($95; $170 couples); Beer and Burgers, 6:30 p.m. June 27 ($85; $160 couples); Frozen Desserts, 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. June 28 ($125); Pascale Beale: Salade, 6:30 p.m. July 9 ($85); Quick and Easy Basic Entrees, four weeks, 6;30 p.m. July 10 ($325 for series; $85 per class); Crazy for Crab, 6:30 p.m. July 11 ($90; $170 couples); Sizzling Summer Appetizers, 6:30 p.m. July 15 ($85). Reservations required. 4643 Lakeview Canyon Road, Westlake Village. 818-991-3940. www.letsgetcookin.com

Sur La Table — Farmers Market: Southeast Asian Street Foods, 6:30 p.m. June 24 ($69); Secrets of Grilling, 6:30 p.m. June 25 ($69); Date Night: Great Summer Cooking, 5 and 8 p.m. June 27 ($79); Modern Pickling, 10 a.m. June 28 and June 30 ($69); Cool Summer Treats, 2 p.m. June 28 ($69); Date Night: Summer Grilling, 5 and 8 p.m. June 28 ($79); Thai Menu Favorites, 2 p.m. June 29 ($69); Learn to Cut Like a Pro, 10 a.m. July 1 ($59); Grilled Seafood, 6:30 p.m. July 2 ($79); Cooking Without Recipes, 10 a.m. July 3 ($69); Date Night: Summer Cooking, 6:30 p.m. July 3 ($79); 10 Skills Every Cook Should Know, 10 a.m. July 5 ($69); Pasta from Scratch, 11 a.m. July 6 ($69); Date Night: Brazilian Steakhouse Menu, 6 p.m. July 6 ($85); Macarons, 10 a.m. July 12-13 ($69); French Bistro Favorites, 6 p.m. July 13 ($69). Reservations required. Age 18 and older. 6333 W. Third St., Los Angeles. 323-954-9190. www.surlatable.com

Chef Eric’s Culinary Classroom: Favorite Fish Recipes, 7 p.m. June 24; Grilling Favorites, 7 p.m. June 27; Spanish Cuisine, 2 p.m. June 28; Sushi, 7 p.m. July 11 ($95). Most classes $90. Reservations required. 2366 Pelham Ave., Los Angeles. 310-470-2640. www.culinaryclassroom.com

Charm City Cakes: Learn how to create a “Stars and Stripes” decorated cake, 11 a.m. June 28. Minimum age 14. Cost $150 for each. Reservations by phone or info@charmcitycakeswest.com. 8302-A Melrose Ave., Los Angeles. 323-642-7234.

Events

Saint Martha: New modern American menu with wine by the glass from “under appreciated regions.” Hours: 5-10:30 p.m. Sunday, Tuesday-Thursday; 5 p.m.-midnight Friday-Saturday. 740 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles. 213-387-2300. www.saintmartharestaurant.com

Los Angeles County Fair culinary competitions: Variety of contest categories including almost homemade, barbecue, reception cake, cheesecake, chili, Gold Medal Flour cookies, leftover turkey, European pastry, pie, pumpkin and tamales. Preserved foods entry forms due June 24; baked foods, confections and other categories entry forms due Aug. 1. Rules and forms from the website. The fair is Aug. 29 to Sept. 28 at Fairplex, 1101 W. McKinley Ave., Pomona. www.lacountyfair.com/partners/new-competitions

Napa Valley Grille: Five course wine dinner with wines from Frank Family Vineyards, 7 p.m. June 24. Cost $95 plus tax and tip. 1100 Glendon Ave., Los Angeles. 310-824-3322. www.napavalleygrille.com

Enzo and Angela: Italian wine tasting dinner, 7 p.m. June 25. Cost $75. Reservations required. 11701 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. 310-477-3880. www.enzoandangela.com

James Beard Foundation’s Celebrity Chef Tour dinner at Pedalers Fork: Discussion and food by Sam Baxter, Gavin Lansdale, Christian Monchatre and Dan Murray, 6 p.m. June 26. Cost $150. Reservations required. 23504 Calabasas Road, Calabasas. www.celebritycheftour.com

Barnsdall Art Park Foundation’s Friday Night Wine Tasting: Silverlake Wine presents the tasting, 5:30-8:30 p.m. June 27 and Fridays through Sept. 5. Cost $25 (includes a limited-edition wine glass); $5 children over age 3; $15 designated nondrinker (no sales at the door). Bring your own picnic; food trucks. No dogs. Check website for parking tips. Barnsdall Art Park, 4800 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. www.barnsdall.org

Great Oxnard Salsa Challenge: Salsa categories for the contest include fruit, green, hot, medium, mild and red. Entry fee $25 per salsa. Entry form deadline July 11. Check website for contest details. Oxnard Salsa Festival, with salsa tasting tent, cooking demonstrations, marketplace, music and salsa dance contest, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. July 26-27 at Plaza Park, Fifth and B streets. 805-247-0197. www.oxnardsalsafestival.com

Holly.Andres@langnews.com

South Bay area

Classes

Kids cooking class: Kids will learn how to make hand-rolled sushi with ingredients of their choice at a class offered by Mitsuwa Marketplace’s Torrance store, 21515 S. Western Ave., Torrance. Every participant will receive a goody bag, free apron and bandana. The class is scheduled for 11-11:45 a.m. July 6, but reservations are required by July 1. Call 310-782-0335, www.mitsuwa.com.

Events

Homemade Brew Food Festival: Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles celebrates its second anniversary with dozens of beers from local clubs, emerging food artisans and live music. A portion of all proceeds will be donated to San Pedro Art Association to help fund next year’s All Grades Student Art Competition. Port of Los Angeles, Warehouse No. 10, 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro. 2-6 p.m. June 29. Call 310-732-1270 or email info@craftedportla.com.

Riviera Village Summer Festival: International food court, more than 200 arts and crafts, carnival rides, beer garden, live bands; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. June 28-29. Catalina Avenue and Avenue I, Redondo Beach; www.rvsummerfestival.com.

Sandy.Gerety@langnews.com

Long Beach area

Renaissance Long Beach’s Day of Discovery: Bringing together the best of Long Beach’s music, food, art and drinks. There will also be a live cocktail competition. 6-9 p.m. June 26. Renaissance Hotel, 111 E Ocean Blvd., Long Beach. renaissance-hotels.marriott.com/renaissance-long-beach-hotel

Dancin’ in the Streets: Live music performances by Allah Las, California Lions and more. As well as a Beachwood BBQ Brewing Beer Garden. 7-11 p.m. Downtown Long Beach Promenade, on Ocean Blvd. Admission is free. Call 562-436-4259 or visit www.summerandmusic.com

Pirate Invasion Mermaid Festival: Sword fights, costume contest, live music, food and drinks. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. June 28, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. June 29. Belmont Pier, 15 39th Place, Long Beach. Admission is free. www.alfredosbeachclub.com

Brittany.Taylor@langnews.com

San Gabriel Valley area

Classes

Fiore Market Cafe: Bread-making class, rustic loaves, focaccia and baguettes, 7-10 p.m. July 15. $30, payment due at sign up, 1000 Fremont Ave., South Pasadena. 626-441-2280 or www.fioremarketcafe.com/

Roy’s Restaurant: Summer entertaining cooking class, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. June 29. $55. Learn to make California roll, Chinese chicken salad and classic braised short ribs in this hands-on, interactive class. 626-356-4066 for reservations. 641 E. Colorado Blvd. roysrestaurant.com

The Village Kitchen Shoppe: Hands-On: Seared scallops and prosciutto wrapped shrimp, 6 p.m. June 26. $50. Lunch and learn class: Sambal chicken skewers with garlicky yogurt, Israeli couscous, 11 a.m. June 27. $25. Take a break: Bacon hash, baked eggs with tomato, herbs and cream, candied Applewood bacon, orange marmalade bread and butter pudding, 11 a.m. June 28. $50. 147 N. Glendora Ave., Glendora. Reservations to 626-914-7897 or Villagekitchenshoppe.com

Williams-Sonoma: Everything Ice Cream: June 29. Classes for junior chefs (ages 8 and up) are 9:30 a.m. Saturdays. June 28: Ice cream in minutes, for ages 5-12. Must register at least 24 hours in advance. Call your local Williams-Sonoma to register and find out times for free technique classes. Nearby locations include: Westfield Santa Anita, 626-445-1585, Brea Mall, 714-256-9301, and Pasadena at the Commons, 142 S. Lake Ave. 626-795-5045 or www.williams-sonoma.com

Events

L.A. Street Food Fest: 6-10 p.m. June 28. General admission, all ages $55. 4-10 p.m. VIP early admission, all ages $80. All-you-can-eat samples from more than 100 food trucks from Los Angeles and Mexico, plus street carts, stands, local restaurants. Beer samples from Angel City, Golden Road, Singha, Stella and others, samples of signature cocktails and a new iced coffee lounge. Enjoy frozen treats, vote in the Street Food cook-off. Children age 7 and younger are free with a paying adult. Wristband required for alcoholic beverages. Only service dogs with proper paperwork will be permitted. Tickets are available online only and are non-refundable. Hosted at the Rose Bowl, 1001 Rose Bowl Drive, Pasadena. www.eventbrite.com

Whole Foods Arroyo: Cheese night, featuring seasonal tastes from buffalo, goat and sheep milk, 6-7:30 p.m. June 24. Free, but may add optional wine pairing for $10. Space limited, RSVP to sparr.marketing@wholefoods.com. 465 S. Arroyo Parkway, Pasadena. www.wholefoods.com

Whole Foods Pasadena: Summer’s best cheeses, seasonal tastes from buffalo, goat and sheep milk, 6-7 p.m. June 24. Free, but RSVP to sp.pas.marketing@wholefoods.com and include number of guests in your party. 3751 E. Foothill Boulevard, at Rosemead, Pasadena. 626-351-5994.

Bristol Farms: Maddalena is the oldest bonded winery in Los Angeles. Their wines, plus some Spanish and Italian gems as well, 6-8 p.m. June 26. Contact cafe for reservations and price, 626-441-5450. 606 Fair Oaks Ave., South Pasadena. www.bristolfarms.com/events

Fairplex: Food trucks from 5:30-8:30 p.m. June 26. Subject to change, but scheduled are Chunk-n-Chip, Crepes Bonaparte, Currywurst, Farmers Belly, Haute Burger, MexiCalbi, Ragin’ Cajun, and Schmuck Truck. Free parking and entry, Gate 1, 1101 W. McKinley Ave., Pomona. www.fairplex.com

Dog Haus Biergarten: Second annual hot dog eating contest is back July 5. Qualifying rounds are 7-10 p.m. June 26. Anyone interested in entering the hot dog eating contest must participate in a qualifying round prior to the July 5 competition. Contestants must completely finish four dogs in a bun in their fastest time possible. The 10 fastest times advance to the finals. Register to 626-683-0808. Dog Haus Biergarten is located at 93 E. Green St., Pasadena.

Send information for events two weeks in advance to 626-544-0845 or features@sgvn.com

Linda.Gold@langnews.com

Inland Valley area

Classes

Everything Ice Cream: June 29. Classes for junior chefs (ages 8 and up) are 9:30 a.m. Saturdays. June 28: Ice cream in minutes, for ages 5-12. Must register at least 24 hours in advance. Call your local Williams-Sonoma to register and find out times for free technique classes. Williams-Sonoma, Victoria Gardens, 12514 S. Mainstreet, Rancho Cucamonga, 909-646-8400, www.wiiliams-sonoma.com

Events

Pechanga’s Sixth Annual Microbrew Craft Beer Festival: 1-5 p.m. June 28, tickets, $25 for designated driver, $45 general admission, Pechanga Casino and Resort, 45000 Pechanga Parkway, Temecula, 951-770-2507, www.pechanga.com

Blues Brews Craft Brew Walk: 4-8 p.m. June 28, tickets $20-$50, Claremont Village at First Street and Harvard Avenue, Claremont, 909-626-1364, www.claremontbluesandbrews.com

Mt. Baldy Fire Dept. 57th Annual Steak Fry: 3-9 p.m. June 28, tickets $10-$25, Mt. Baldy Trout Pools, 6945 Mt. Baldy Road, Mt. Baldy, 909-982-1213, www.mtbaldyfire.com

Elaine.Lehman@langnews.com

Recommended Reading

Jun 25, 2014
Tim Lester

Tacolandia, Homemade Brew & Food Festival, cooking classes and more food …



More than 40 taco vendors are expected to participate in the second annual Tacolandia, a celebration of the yummy-filled tortillas that have become a staple street food of Los Angeles.

Soho Taco, which makes every tortilla from scratch and even has gluten-free tacos, plans to serve one of its specialty tacos that consist of marinated shrimp, grilled with garlic butter and topped with cabbage, cheese and chipotle sour cream.

Another vendor to make an appearance at the event is Carnitas El Momo, who was awarded “Best in Show” at Groupon’s Taco Madness event earlier this year. Carnitas El Momo has been around for 41 years serving savory carnitas, which are often raved about on Yelp.

There will also be food demonstrations, a tequila garden and La Tortilla Factory will be giving out free packages of handmade white corn tortillas to the first 1,500 attendees who visit its booth.

Tacolandia: 3-7 p.m. June 28. Minimum age 21. Tickets $30; $50 includes VIP gift bag and five drink tickets; $20 for tequila garden (does not include admission to event). El Pueblo de Los Angeles, 125 Paseo de la Plaza, Los Angeles. www.ticketfly.com/purchase/event/554827

Los Angeles, San Fernando Valley and Santa Monica area

Classes

Cook LA: Cuban Menu, 6:45 p.m. June 26 ($75); Italian Menu Favorites, 6 p.m. June 28 ($75); Healthy Summer Menu, 5:30 p.m. June 29 ($70); Grilling 101, 6 p.m. July 5 ($75); Healthy Armenian Menu: Nancy Mehagian introduces recipes from her book “Siren’s Feast — An Edible Odyssey” and signs the book, 7 p.m. July 11 ($75); Knife Skills, 5:30 p.m. July 13 ($75); Girls Night Out, 7 p.m. July 18 ($75); Tapas from Around the World, 6 p.m. July 19 ($75); Artisan Bread, 10:30 a.m. July 20 ($75); Thai Menu, 6 p.m. July 26 ($65); Indian Menu, 6:45 p.m. July 31 ($75). Reservations required. 10938 Ventura Blvd., Studio City. 818-760-5157. www.cooklaonline.com

Chez Cherie Cooking School: Thrill of the Grill, 6:30 p.m. June 24-25 ($70); Saveur Cooks: American Classics, 6:30 p.m. July 1 ($75); Fresh Asian Flavors, 6:30 p.m. July 8 ($65); Summer Farmer’s Market Finds, 6:30 p.m. July 15 ($65); Flavors of the Mediterranean, 6:30 p.m. July 22 ($75); Cookbook Cooking, 6:30 p.m. July 29 ($65). Reservations required. 1401 Foothill Blvd., La Canada Flintridge. 818-952-7217. www.chezcherie.com

Let’s Get Cookin’: Moroccan Menu, 6:30 p.m. June 24 ($85; $160 couples); Steve Raichlen: Man Made Meals demonstration, tasting and book signing, 6:30 p.m. June 25 ($95; $170 couples); Beer and Burgers, 6:30 p.m. June 27 ($85; $160 couples); Frozen Desserts, 10:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. June 28 ($125); Pascale Beale: Salade, 6:30 p.m. July 9 ($85); Quick and Easy Basic Entrees, four weeks, 6;30 p.m. July 10 ($325 for series; $85 per class); Crazy for Crab, 6:30 p.m. July 11 ($90; $170 couples); Sizzling Summer Appetizers, 6:30 p.m. July 15 ($85). Reservations required. 4643 Lakeview Canyon Road, Westlake Village. 818-991-3940. www.letsgetcookin.com

Sur La Table — Farmers Market: Southeast Asian Street Foods, 6:30 p.m. June 24 ($69); Secrets of Grilling, 6:30 p.m. June 25 ($69); Date Night: Great Summer Cooking, 5 and 8 p.m. June 27 ($79); Modern Pickling, 10 a.m. June 28 and June 30 ($69); Cool Summer Treats, 2 p.m. June 28 ($69); Date Night: Summer Grilling, 5 and 8 p.m. June 28 ($79); Thai Menu Favorites, 2 p.m. June 29 ($69); Learn to Cut Like a Pro, 10 a.m. July 1 ($59); Grilled Seafood, 6:30 p.m. July 2 ($79); Cooking Without Recipes, 10 a.m. July 3 ($69); Date Night: Summer Cooking, 6:30 p.m. July 3 ($79); 10 Skills Every Cook Should Know, 10 a.m. July 5 ($69); Pasta from Scratch, 11 a.m. July 6 ($69); Date Night: Brazilian Steakhouse Menu, 6 p.m. July 6 ($85); Macarons, 10 a.m. July 12-13 ($69); French Bistro Favorites, 6 p.m. July 13 ($69). Reservations required. Age 18 and older. 6333 W. Third St., Los Angeles. 323-954-9190. www.surlatable.com

Chef Eric’s Culinary Classroom: Favorite Fish Recipes, 7 p.m. June 24; Grilling Favorites, 7 p.m. June 27; Spanish Cuisine, 2 p.m. June 28; Sushi, 7 p.m. July 11 ($95). Most classes $90. Reservations required. 2366 Pelham Ave., Los Angeles. 310-470-2640. www.culinaryclassroom.com

Charm City Cakes: Learn how to create a “Stars and Stripes” decorated cake, 11 a.m. June 28. Minimum age 14. Cost $150 for each. Reservations by phone or info@charmcitycakeswest.com. 8302-A Melrose Ave., Los Angeles. 323-642-7234.

Events

Saint Martha: New modern American menu with wine by the glass from “under appreciated regions.” Hours: 5-10:30 p.m. Sunday, Tuesday-Thursday; 5 p.m.-midnight Friday-Saturday. 740 S. Western Ave., Los Angeles. 213-387-2300. www.saintmartharestaurant.com

Los Angeles County Fair culinary competitions: Variety of contest categories including almost homemade, barbecue, reception cake, cheesecake, chili, Gold Medal Flour cookies, leftover turkey, European pastry, pie, pumpkin and tamales. Preserved foods entry forms due June 24; baked foods, confections and other categories entry forms due Aug. 1. Rules and forms from the website. The fair is Aug. 29 to Sept. 28 at Fairplex, 1101 W. McKinley Ave., Pomona. www.lacountyfair.com/partners/new-competitions

Napa Valley Grille: Five course wine dinner with wines from Frank Family Vineyards, 7 p.m. June 24. Cost $95 plus tax and tip. 1100 Glendon Ave., Los Angeles. 310-824-3322. www.napavalleygrille.com

Enzo and Angela: Italian wine tasting dinner, 7 p.m. June 25. Cost $75. Reservations required. 11701 Wilshire Blvd., Los Angeles. 310-477-3880. www.enzoandangela.com

James Beard Foundation’s Celebrity Chef Tour dinner at Pedalers Fork: Discussion and food by Sam Baxter, Gavin Lansdale, Christian Monchatre and Dan Murray, 6 p.m. June 26. Cost $150. Reservations required. 23504 Calabasas Road, Calabasas. www.celebritycheftour.com

Barnsdall Art Park Foundation’s Friday Night Wine Tasting: Silverlake Wine presents the tasting, 5:30-8:30 p.m. June 27 and Fridays through Sept. 5. Cost $25 (includes a limited-edition wine glass); $5 children over age 3; $15 designated nondrinker (no sales at the door). Bring your own picnic; food trucks. No dogs. Check website for parking tips. Barnsdall Art Park, 4800 Hollywood Blvd., Los Angeles. www.barnsdall.org

Great Oxnard Salsa Challenge: Salsa categories for the contest include fruit, green, hot, medium, mild and red. Entry fee $25 per salsa. Entry form deadline July 11. Check website for contest details. Oxnard Salsa Festival, with salsa tasting tent, cooking demonstrations, marketplace, music and salsa dance contest, 11 a.m.-7 p.m. July 26-27 at Plaza Park, Fifth and B streets. 805-247-0197. www.oxnardsalsafestival.com

Holly.Andres@langnews.com

South Bay area

Classes

Kids cooking class: Kids will learn how to make hand-rolled sushi with ingredients of their choice at a class offered by Mitsuwa Marketplace’s Torrance store, 21515 S. Western Ave., Torrance. Every participant will receive a goody bag, free apron and bandana. The class is scheduled for 11-11:45 a.m. July 6, but reservations are required by July 1. Call 310-782-0335, www.mitsuwa.com.

Events

Homemade Brew Food Festival: Crafted at the Port of Los Angeles celebrates its second anniversary with dozens of beers from local clubs, emerging food artisans and live music. A portion of all proceeds will be donated to San Pedro Art Association to help fund next year’s All Grades Student Art Competition. Port of Los Angeles, Warehouse No. 10, 112 E. 22nd St., San Pedro. 2-6 p.m. June 29. Call 310-732-1270 or email info@craftedportla.com.

Riviera Village Summer Festival: International food court, more than 200 arts and crafts, carnival rides, beer garden, live bands; 10 a.m.-7 p.m. June 28-29. Catalina Avenue and Avenue I, Redondo Beach; www.rvsummerfestival.com.

Sandy.Gerety@langnews.com

Long Beach area

Renaissance Long Beach’s Day of Discovery: Bringing together the best of Long Beach’s music, food, art and drinks. There will also be a live cocktail competition. 6-9 p.m. June 26. Renaissance Hotel, 111 E Ocean Blvd., Long Beach. renaissance-hotels.marriott.com/renaissance-long-beach-hotel

Dancin’ in the Streets: Live music performances by Allah Las, California Lions and more. As well as a Beachwood BBQ Brewing Beer Garden. 7-11 p.m. Downtown Long Beach Promenade, on Ocean Blvd. Admission is free. Call 562-436-4259 or visit www.summerandmusic.com

Pirate Invasion Mermaid Festival: Sword fights, costume contest, live music, food and drinks. 10 a.m.-9 p.m. June 28, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. June 29. Belmont Pier, 15 39th Place, Long Beach. Admission is free. www.alfredosbeachclub.com

Brittany.Taylor@langnews.com

San Gabriel Valley area

Classes

Fiore Market Cafe: Bread-making class, rustic loaves, focaccia and baguettes, 7-10 p.m. July 15. $30, payment due at sign up, 1000 Fremont Ave., South Pasadena. 626-441-2280 or www.fioremarketcafe.com/

Roy’s Restaurant: Summer entertaining cooking class, 11 a.m.-1:30 p.m. June 29. $55. Learn to make California roll, Chinese chicken salad and classic braised short ribs in this hands-on, interactive class. 626-356-4066 for reservations. 641 E. Colorado Blvd. roysrestaurant.com

The Village Kitchen Shoppe: Hands-On: Seared scallops and prosciutto wrapped shrimp, 6 p.m. June 26. $50. Lunch and learn class: Sambal chicken skewers with garlicky yogurt, Israeli couscous, 11 a.m. June 27. $25. Take a break: Bacon hash, baked eggs with tomato, herbs and cream, candied Applewood bacon, orange marmalade bread and butter pudding, 11 a.m. June 28. $50. 147 N. Glendora Ave., Glendora. Reservations to 626-914-7897 or Villagekitchenshoppe.com

Williams-Sonoma: Everything Ice Cream: June 29. Classes for junior chefs (ages 8 and up) are 9:30 a.m. Saturdays. June 28: Ice cream in minutes, for ages 5-12. Must register at least 24 hours in advance. Call your local Williams-Sonoma to register and find out times for free technique classes. Nearby locations include: Westfield Santa Anita, 626-445-1585, Brea Mall, 714-256-9301, and Pasadena at the Commons, 142 S. Lake Ave. 626-795-5045 or www.williams-sonoma.com

Events

L.A. Street Food Fest: 6-10 p.m. June 28. General admission, all ages $55. 4-10 p.m. VIP early admission, all ages $80. All-you-can-eat samples from more than 100 food trucks from Los Angeles and Mexico, plus street carts, stands, local restaurants. Beer samples from Angel City, Golden Road, Singha, Stella and others, samples of signature cocktails and a new iced coffee lounge. Enjoy frozen treats, vote in the Street Food cook-off. Children age 7 and younger are free with a paying adult. Wristband required for alcoholic beverages. Only service dogs with proper paperwork will be permitted. Tickets are available online only and are non-refundable. Hosted at the Rose Bowl, 1001 Rose Bowl Drive, Pasadena. www.eventbrite.com

Whole Foods Arroyo: Cheese night, featuring seasonal tastes from buffalo, goat and sheep milk, 6-7:30 p.m. June 24. Free, but may add optional wine pairing for $10. Space limited, RSVP to sparr.marketing@wholefoods.com. 465 S. Arroyo Parkway, Pasadena. www.wholefoods.com

Whole Foods Pasadena: Summer’s best cheeses, seasonal tastes from buffalo, goat and sheep milk, 6-7 p.m. June 24. Free, but RSVP to sp.pas.marketing@wholefoods.com and include number of guests in your party. 3751 E. Foothill Boulevard, at Rosemead, Pasadena. 626-351-5994.

Bristol Farms: Maddalena is the oldest bonded winery in Los Angeles. Their wines, plus some Spanish and Italian gems as well, 6-8 p.m. June 26. Contact cafe for reservations and price, 626-441-5450. 606 Fair Oaks Ave., South Pasadena. www.bristolfarms.com/events

Fairplex: Food trucks from 5:30-8:30 p.m. June 26. Subject to change, but scheduled are Chunk-n-Chip, Crepes Bonaparte, Currywurst, Farmers Belly, Haute Burger, MexiCalbi, Ragin’ Cajun, and Schmuck Truck. Free parking and entry, Gate 1, 1101 W. McKinley Ave., Pomona. www.fairplex.com

Dog Haus Biergarten: Second annual hot dog eating contest is back July 5. Qualifying rounds are 7-10 p.m. June 26. Anyone interested in entering the hot dog eating contest must participate in a qualifying round prior to the July 5 competition. Contestants must completely finish four dogs in a bun in their fastest time possible. The 10 fastest times advance to the finals. Register to 626-683-0808. Dog Haus Biergarten is located at 93 E. Green St., Pasadena.

Send information for events two weeks in advance to 626-544-0845 or features@sgvn.com

Linda.Gold@langnews.com

Inland Valley area

Classes

Everything Ice Cream: June 29. Classes for junior chefs (ages 8 and up) are 9:30 a.m. Saturdays. June 28: Ice cream in minutes, for ages 5-12. Must register at least 24 hours in advance. Call your local Williams-Sonoma to register and find out times for free technique classes. Williams-Sonoma, Victoria Gardens, 12514 S. Mainstreet, Rancho Cucamonga, 909-646-8400, www.wiiliams-sonoma.com

Events

Pechanga’s Sixth Annual Microbrew Craft Beer Festival: 1-5 p.m. June 28, tickets, $25 for designated driver, $45 general admission, Pechanga Casino and Resort, 45000 Pechanga Parkway, Temecula, 951-770-2507, www.pechanga.com

Blues Brews Craft Brew Walk: 4-8 p.m. June 28, tickets $20-$50, Claremont Village at First Street and Harvard Avenue, Claremont, 909-626-1364, www.claremontbluesandbrews.com

Mt. Baldy Fire Dept. 57th Annual Steak Fry: 3-9 p.m. June 28, tickets $10-$25, Mt. Baldy Trout Pools, 6945 Mt. Baldy Road, Mt. Baldy, 909-982-1213, www.mtbaldyfire.com

Elaine.Lehman@langnews.com

Recommended Reading

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