Mar 29, 2014
Freddie Kitson

The Bar Man – And the winner is …

How are the awards going? Baftas? Check. Golden Globes? Check. Oscars? Check. I even saw the Slave film, although when I went into the cinema I was under the impression that I had a ticket for The Wolf of Wall Street.

That’s the films dealt with, so how about the books? The Man Booker prize winner, The Luminaries is available soon in paperback, so I hope you have reserved your copy. If you weren’t at the recent Arts and Science Society lecture, here is a tip from the chair of the Man Booker organising committee. You will appreciate The Luminaries more on the second and third readings.

At 852 pages that might cut into your day a bit, so you may have to give up on some of the other 50-odd winners of various prizes available for books in this country.

So what of pubs and beer? Beer tends to suffer from the award inflation which afflicts so many other areas. CAMRA recognises gold, silver and bronze awards in eight categories at a national level, and there are corresponding accolades at county and regional levels as well as awards for winter ales, bottled beers and those given by individual beer festivals. No wonder many breweries have walls full of certificates. It is not to say that the winners are undeserving, and we are especially proud of the Two Rivers Brewery from Denver in West Norfolk which has gained gold in the Norfolk bottled beer awards for their Porters Pride, which is also available on draught, the most recent sighting being in the Chequers at Wimbotsham.

However it seems to me that the only accolade which really enters the national consciousness is the overall champion beer of Britain, currently Elland 1872 Porter.

With pubs, we have only two champions in West Norfolk each year, so for the next 12 months the spotlight is trained on the Coach and Horses at Dersingham, our newly-crowned Pub of the Year. If you have not been, why not go and have a look at a classic village pub?

It doesn’t have the airs and graces of some of the more discovered upmarket pubs by the coast, but if you want good beer, decent food and a friendly atmosphere you will need to go a long way to find anywhere better. To win the award it had to overcome the challenge of three other excellent pubs on the shortlist, which it did by the very narrowest of margins, less than 0.5 per cent, which I think is a tribute to the quality of many of our local pubs.

We think The Coach and Horses has a great chance to go on to become the Norfolk pub of the year when it goes up against the Fat Cat in Norwich.

The ultimate aim is to challenge for the national pub of the year, which for the second year in a row has gone to Lancashire. Succeeding the Baum in Rochdale is The Swan with Two Necks in Pendleton, near Clitheroe.

Cider drinkers get their own Pub of the Year award and once again our choice is the current national champion, the Railway in Downham. To become Norfolk champion it must beat off the White Lion in Norwich and the Banham Barrels. If you are a local CAMRA member you can help to choose the Norfolk champions if you are prepared to visit the branch winners and fill in a score sheet.

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Mar 29, 2014
Tina George

Florida’s Capital City Serves up 3rd Annual Restaurant Week 7 Concert Series

A mixture of eateries and nightlife for nearly every taste.

Florida’s Capital City Serves up 3rd Annual Restaurant Week 7 Concert Series

Author- News on the Net  Friday, March 28, 2014
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Tallahassee, Fla. – Celebrating the diverse selection of dining options and the city’s growing reputation as a culinary destination, Visit Tallahassee presents the 3rd Annual Capital Cuisine Restaurant Week and Concert Series, May 15 – 27, 2014.

Patrons dine their way through the Capital City, exploring the food, music and entertainment showcased in five different districts – Gaines Street, Midtown, Market District, College Town and Downtown. Regardless of location, farm-to-table offerings, eclectic food trucks, contemporary bars and annual food festivals, give the city a mixture of eateries and nightlife for nearly every taste.

Location influences food today as it did thousands of years ago. Fertile soil and a mild climate contribute to Tallahassee’s readily available, locally grown ingredients, and with the Gulf of Mexico only 25 miles away, fresh seafood finds its way onto menus everywhere.

For more information on Capital Cuisine Restaurant Week Concert Series, a complete list of participating restaurants and free concerts, visit www.VisitTallahassee.com/CapitalCuisine or call Visit Tallahassee toll free at (800) 628-2866.

“Tallahassee’s dining options are unlike anything in our region,” said Lee Daniel, Visit Tallahassee’s executive director. “Tallahassee offers a diverse menu of authentic regional cuisine, fine dining and international fare that has quickly attracted the attention and awards from leading food critics.”

Participating restaurants offer specially selected menus for lunch and dinner, featuring two to three course meals priced at $15 or $30 respectively. Many restaurants and other venues also offer live entertainment.

Visitors are encouraged to share dining and concert experiences by using the hashtag #IHeartTally on Twitter Facebook, Instagram and Vine.

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Mar 29, 2014
Tina George

Wind Creek Hospitality Announces Major Initiative Focused on Supporting and … – SYS

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MONTGOMERY, Ala., March 28, 2014 /PRNewswire/ – Wind Creek Hospitality (WCH), one of the largest hospitality companies in Alabama, today announced a bold new initiative focused on promoting regional food that includes growers, purveyors, consumers, chefs and restaurateurs, amateur cooks, food banks, and non-profits promoting healthy lifestyles. 

“Wind Creek’s Southern Table: Setting a Place for Good Food” is a multi-faceted initiative spearheaded by WCH President Jay Dorris.  Designed to expand access to good food for citizens across the region, this effort will promote the culinary industry and its traditions, and support locally grown and produced food.

In making today’s announcement in Montgomery, WCH’s Vice President of Marketing Michael Perhaes was joined by Edwin Marty, Executive Director of EATSouth, which has an urban farm in downtown Montgomery, and Caroline Rosen, Executive Director of Front Porch Revival, an organization comprised of regional culinary professionals.

Perhaes said, “The good food that is grown all across our region should be available to everyone, and we are making a targeted effort to have what’s grown here and what’s made locally offered on our Wind Creek menus. We also want to make sure that our culinary community is valued and encouraged to grow.” 

Wind Creek Hospitality is extremely fortunate to have great partners in these efforts like EATSouth and Front Porch Revival.”

“Wind Creek’s Southern Table” encompasses several strategies.  First, it will offer philanthropic support to organizations such as EAT South, which encourages healthy lifestyles through education and sustainable food production. “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” will also support food pantries and other food distribution efforts aimed at helping needy families across the region. 

Edwin Marty, EATSouth’s Executive Director noted, “Having a company the size of Wind Creek Hospitality involved in making good food accessible has the potential to make a powerful impact on our State and our region.”

As part of “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” commitment to local growers and purveyors, Wind Creek Hospitality has also committed to using locally grown and produced food in all of its restaurants whenever possible. Already, WCH’s food and beverage operations at its properties, Wind Creek Atmore, Wind Creek Wetumpka and Creek Casino Montgomery, play a major role in supporting local food production.

For example, in the past 6 months, WCH has purchased 243,190 pounds of local chicken, 48,670 pounds of local catfish, 912 Alabama-made cakes and 15,280 pounds of locally made sausage. WCH’s chefs have also committed to regularly featuring more seasonal produce and specialty products such as Belle Chevre cheese made in Elkmont, Alabama. 

Additionally, as part of “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” initiative, WCH is continuing to work with smaller producers and local growers on challenges they face with distribution and quantity of available items.  For example, WCH and its produce supplier, Southeastern Fresh Produce, have developed a new system of distribution that provides a way for small Community Supported Agriculture enterprises, like Season in the Sun Farm in Baldwin County, to sell their fresh produce commercially.       

Several efforts to promote culinary excellence are also part of “Wind Creek’s Southern Table” including sponsorship of food festivals such as Gulf Shore’s Annual National Shrimp Festival and amateur cooking events like barbeque cook-offs. 

“Wind Creek Hospitality’s commitment is going to make a huge difference to the restaurant industry and the future of food in our region,” said Caroline Rosen. “Not only will ‘Wind Creek’s Southern Table’ support our local farmers, it will also mean that more great chefs will be trained here and have notable careers without leaving home.”

“Wind Creek’s Southern Table” will have a rolling kitchen supporting many of its programs and projects.  The 24-foot long food truck, which took 5 1/2 months to outfit, has been dubbed “Good to Go”. It has an industrial kitchen onboard with the capability of producing hundreds of meals at a time.  The truck’s traveling culinary ambassador, Chef Paul Norton, has promised that the truck will not only serve good food, it will also serve as a rolling repository of information about good food in the region – where to get it and how to make it.

“I want to have ‘Good to Go’ be a place where people can talk about, learn about, and enjoy great food,” said Chef Paul.  “This is a chance for WCH to really support the growers and food producers in our region and share great meals with our neighbors.  It will truly be a moveable feast.”

Follow Wind Creek Hospitality on Facebook.com/windcreekhospitality and Twitter @wchospitality

Follow “Good to Go” on Facebook/tastewindcreek and Twitter @tastewindcreek  #goodtogo

About Wind Creek Hospitality
Wind Creek Hospitality operates casinos, hotels, racetracks, poker rooms, and entertainment facilities in Alabama and Florida including the 236-room resort Wind Creek Casino Hotel Atmore, the 283-room resort Wind Creek Casino Hotel Wetumpka, Creek Casino Montgomery and Mobile Greyhound Park in Alabama. In Florida, WCH operates the Pensacola Greyhound Track Poker Room and Creek Entertainment Gretna. Wind Creek Hospitality is an authority of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians. 

The Poarch Creek Indians are descendants of a segment of the original Creek Nation, which once covered almost all of Alabama and Georgia. Unlike many eastern Indian tribes, the Poarch Creeks were not removed from their tribal lands and have lived together for almost 200 years in and around the reservation in Poarch, Alabama.

The reservation is located eight miles northwest of Atmore, Alabama, in rural Escambia County, and 57 miles east of Mobile.  The Poarch Creek Indians is the only federally recognized Indian Tribe in the state of Alabama, operating as a sovereign nation with its own system of government and bylaws. The Tribe operates a variety of economic enterprises, employing thousands of area residents.

SOURCE Wind Creek Hospitality

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Mar 29, 2014
Tina George

Two Eat Street food festivals on the way

Hopes that events will increase trade

By Jessica Bave, Reporter

Two Eat Street food festivals on the way

THE historic heart of Basingstoke is set to host the first of two Eat Street food festivals in the town centre.

London Street is hosting the event, organised and funded by Basingstoke and Deane Borough Council and Destination Basingstoke, on April 12 from 11am to 3pm, ahead of the food fair a week later in Festival Place.

Basingstoke’s restaurants will open their doors to showcase international cuisine and demonstrate the tricks of their trade.

Accompanied by live music and The Candy Floss Queens, there will also be the chance to decorate cupcakes, make Easter eggs, follow a children’s Easter trail and taste food all for free.

The activities, which are supported and provided by local businesses, hope to draw attention to what is on offer in the area and increase footfall across the town.

Councillor Ranil Jayawardena, deputy leader of the borough council, said: “This will be a great event for local businesses and families looking for something to do on the first weekend of the Easter school holidays – making the Top of The Town a place to come to, not walk through.

“We’re taking the action needed to turn ‘old Basingstoke’ into a more interesting and vibrant destination for residents and visitors today and tomorrow.”

Destination Basingstoke’s managing director Felicity Edwards added: “This is the first time anything like this has happened, and we hope it will encourage more co-operation between local businesses and a better understanding of what they each have to offer.”

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Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Friday brings more dining options to Tupelo

If you haven’t heard, two of the three food trucks now operating in Tupelo are serving lunch today in downtown Tupelo. Food Truck Friday

It’s Food Truck Friday, and Local Mobile and Memphis Style BBQ on Wheels have set up shop in Fairpark in front of City Hall on Main Street.

Two Dudes Mexican Foods wasn’t able to make it this week, as the owners are making modifications on their truck.

Curt McLellan, who opened the city’s first food truck, Local Mobile, last year, said he welcomed more food trucks.

“I think it’s great – it gives people more opportunities to try eating at food trucks,” he said. “We’ve got totally different menus, different price points. … it’s like having a food court at the mall, except we’re here, outside.”

Read more in tomorrow’s Daily Journal.

 

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Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Friday: Rice Box Truck gives new meaning to ‘fast food’

HOUSTON — The Rice Box Truck specializes in your favorite guilty-pleasure Chinese food.  John Peterson, the guy behind “the Box” frequently serves up lunch at his alma mater, the University of Houston.

“I studied business right over there at Melcher Hall,” he explained, pointing down the road.

During his studies, Peterson traveled to China and picked up a passion for the food, which he re-created for the American palate at The Rice Box.

“I just keep it simple, ‘cause the reality is, it is fast food Chinese food — General Tso’s Chicken, sesame, sweet and sour, these are all things I survived on when we were in college,” he said of his food philosophy.

Around campus, Peterson is best known for his General Tso’s Chicken – a twice-fried favorite he drenches in a secret homemade sauce.

From the familiar red and white boxes, to the disposable chopstix and eggrolls, “The Rice Box” is everything you love about Chinese take-out, but out of a truck, and a fast one at that.

“This truck does 0-60 in about 15 seconds — pretty competitive on the street with other food trucks,” he said with a laugh.

Peterson is not just a food guy, he’s also car guy. “Powered by Rice” is proudly stenciled on the front of the truck – a clever reference to the so-called “Ricer” import automotive-culture.  Before the self-taught chef got into food, he set up a blog with half a million Facebook followers across the world, who now follow his food truck, too.

“It’s us putting Houston on their map,” he said.

From fast food to fast cars, Peterson said he’s happy he returned to Houston to serve the school that helped make it all happen. 

“It is like the universe put me back out here,” he said.

Peterson is planning to open a second truck within the next few weeks.  He frequently serves the UH campus and the Montrose area.  You can follow him on Twitter @RiceBoxTruck. 

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Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Three pieces of food truck news

Three pieces of food truck news: one good, two bad

1

Food Truck rallies resume on Sunday: After a long, cold winter, Wichita’s food truckers are ready to resume their monthly gatherings, which they try to make happen on the last Sunday of the month. This month’s happens from noon to 3 p.m. Sunday at the Wichita WaterWalk, 515 S. Main. The lineup includes B.S. Sandwich Press, Hopperoni Express, Let’m Eat Brats and The Flying Stove, and all will be serving up Cajun specialties. Before the trucks start serving, Firefly Yoga Studio will put on an outdoor yoga class from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. It’s free, but donations will be accepted.

2

Cake Face is closing: Cake Face Bake Shop, which opened its food truck in 2012, was supposed to be at the rally this weekend but won’t be. Owners Summer and Dave Schoenhals are moving to Oregon for a job opportunity and have closed their business. The couple is selling the truck, an 18×8 upgrade they bought in August. They’ve posted an ad offering the truck and all of its contents for sale on Craigslist.

3

The Rolling Dough also is closed: The food truckers who last summer bought the Schoenhals’ original rig have closed, too. Joseph and Cherre Nestelroad, who opened their pizza food truck last fall, posted last week on the truck’s Facebook wall that they have too much going on in their lives, especially with two small children, to keep the business going. The post indicated that the couple was open to considering giving it another go when their kids are older.

Quick bites

Lotus Leaf on the move

Don’t go to Delano planning to dine at Lotus Leaf Cafe, which opened at 613 W. Douglas in November of 2010. The restaurant has begun its move to a much larger space at 215 N. Washington, right next door to Taste See in Old Town. The Delano spot closed on Saturday. The restaurant owners say the goal is to reopen by 11 a.m. Tuesday with additions such as a coffee/juice/smoothie bar, organic wine and beer and more menu items. To follow along with the reopening, visit the restaurant’s Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/Lotusleafcafe.

Two wine dinners

Wine drinkers have two approaching events to choose from. One is a farewell-to-winter event scheduled for 7 p.m. Saturday at Oeno, the wine bar at 330 N. Mead. The dinner is $40 a person and will feature three springlike courses paired with three wines, plus dessert. Gazpacho, lamb chops and seared scallops are on the menu. For reservations, call 316-440-5000. Then, on Tuesday, Hereford House at 1400 Terradyne St. in Andover will put on a wine event featuring a dinner and three wines. Attendees keep the three Riedel brand glasses the wine is poured in. The event starts at 6 p.m. and costs $150 a person for wine and an additional $40 for dinner. For reservations, call 316-260-6600.

Sixth annual Scottish Rite Pancake Feed

The sixth annual Scottish Rite Pancake Feed, an all-you-can-eat Chris Cakes feast that raises money for the historical Scottish Rite Center, 332 E. First St., is Tuesday. Lunch will be served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., and dinner will be served from 5 to 7 p.m. Admission is $5 at the door. For more information, call 316-263-4218.

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Mar 29, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food truck vendors donate portion of sales to hit-and-run victim

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LEXINGTON, Ky. (WKYT) – Grab a bite to eat at a food truck on Main and Vine Streets anytime before 7:00 Friday night, and 10 percent of the cost will go towards the Barbara Screeney Medical Fund.

Screeney is part-owner of the ‘That’s How We Roll’ food truck. But last November, family members say she was walking home along Old Frankfort Pike, after leaving one of her three jobs, when a car hit her.

Police still have not found the driver responsible. Screeney spent several weeks at UK Hospital, and Cardinal Hill Rehabilitation Hospital, and she is still recovering from a traumatic brain injury.

Family members say numerous medical bills have been piling up since Screeney’s accident. That’s why the other food truck vendors in Lexington are doing what they can to help out their friend.

“I think it’s nice of everybody to do this and we’re going to keep doing this until hopefully she gets better,” says Tracy Latham, a food truck vendor.

Food trucks will be set up until 7:00 p.m. on Friday.

To donate to Screeney’s medical fund online, click on the link in this article.

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