Browsing articles tagged with " beer festivals"
Aug 1, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Eat, Drink and Be Merry at the 3rd Annual Magic Valley Beer Fest – Twin Falls Times

TWIN FALLS • For Shayne Carpenter, a beer festival is about quality and not quantity.

Carpenter said that is what will make the Blue Lakes Rotary Club’s 3rd annual Magic Valley Beer Fest — which is from 1 to 6 p.m. Saturday — stand out from other festivals he has attended. Advance tickets cost $25 and are available at Anchor Bistro, O’Dunken’s Draught House and Twin Stop on Pole Line Road. Admission costs $30 at the gate.

Carpenter, who founded the festival with his wife, Michelle, said when he moved to Twin Falls five years ago, he noticed there wasn’t an established beer festival in the immediate area.

“Between Idaho Falls and Boise, we are the only guy on the block,” he said.

Carpenter said he has attended more than 100 beer festivals, suppers and tastings over the years.

“I thought it was a good way to get craft beer in the Magic Valley,” he said. “We are very proud of our beer festival because it is not unlimited drinking. We want people to sample a beer and not look for volume. It’s about education and not intoxication.”

He said the event last year brought in more than $20,000 and about 750 people attended. He said the goal this year is to hit 1,000 attendees. All the proceeds go toward charities selected by the Blue Lakes Rotary Club.

Carpenter said while some beer festivals will give attendees a two- or three- ounce cup for unlimited sampling, at the Magic Valley Beer Fest, attendees will receive 15 tickets that will be good for 15 4-ounce samples. If you want a full mug, it will cost two tickets.

“With ours, you can relax and actually talk to the brewers. Ours is much more intimate, it’s not about drinking,” Carpenter said. “I’ve been to beer festivals and they can get out of control. We want to make sure its done well.”

The event will feature 96 beers from 39 brewers. Idaho brewers will include Von Scheidt Brewing Co., Sun Valley Brewing Co., Sawtooth Brewery, Payette Brewing Co., Snake River Brewing and Selkirk Abbey.

Food will be available from Buffalo Wild Wings, Anchor Bistro and the Lamb Weston french fry truck. Brizee Heating, Air Conditioning and Fireplaces will serve barbecue.

Live music will be provided by Front Porch Flavor from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., Lakoda from 2:45 to 4:15 p.m. and the Barking Owls from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

“It’s fun, if you like beer, this is the way to go because you get to try new beers without buying a six pack or whole growler,” said Denise Young, a member of Blue Lake Rotary Club and the Beer Fest planning committee.

Besides eating and drinking, people can also try their luck at winning several items in the silent auction and raffle. Young said there will be hunting trips, fishing poles, beer making kits, bicycles and a Pabst Blue Ribbon wakeboard up for grabs.

There will also be a lifesize Jenga game and a bean bag toss set up in the park.

And if you do happen to have too many drinks or think you should take a taxi home, Carpenter said taxi rides will be available to anywhere in Twin Falls for $5.

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Aug 1, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Eat, Drink and Be Merry at the Magic Valley Beer Fest – Twin Falls Times

TWIN FALLS • For Shayne Carpenter, a beer festival is about quality and not quantity.

Carpenter said that is what will make the Blue Lakes Rotary Club’s 3rd annual Magic Valley Beer Fest — which is from 1 to 6 p.m. Saturday — stand out from other festivals he has attended. Advance tickets cost $25 and are available at Anchor Bistro, O’Dunken’s Draught House and Twin Stop on Pole Line Road. Admission costs $30 at the gate.

Carpenter, who founded the festival with his wife, Michelle, said when he moved to Twin Falls five years ago, he noticed there wasn’t an established beer festival in the immediate area.

“Between Idaho Falls and Boise, we are the only guy on the block,” he said.

Carpenter said he has attended more than 100 beer festivals, suppers and tastings over the years.

“I thought it was a good way to get craft beer in the Magic Valley,” he said. “We are very proud of our beer festival because it is not unlimited drinking. We want people to sample a beer and not look for volume. It’s about education and not intoxication.”

He said the event last year brought in more than $20,000 and about 750 people attended. He said the goal this year is to hit 1,000 attendees. All the proceeds go toward charities selected by the Blue Lakes Rotary Club.

Carpenter said while some beer festivals will give attendees a two- or three- ounce cup for unlimited sampling, at the Magic Valley Beer Fest, attendees will receive 15 tickets that will be good for 15 4-ounce samples. If you want a full mug, it will cost two tickets.

“With ours, you can relax and actually talk to the brewers. Ours is much more intimate, it’s not about drinking,” Carpenter said. “I’ve been to beer festivals and they can get out of control. We want to make sure its done well.”

The event will feature 96 beers from 39 brewers. Idaho brewers will include Von Scheidt Brewing Co., Sun Valley Brewing Co., Sawtooth Brewery, Payette Brewing Co., Snake River Brewing and Selkirk Abbey.

Food will be available from Buffalo Wild Wings, Anchor Bistro and the Lamb Weston french fry truck. Brizee Heating, Air Conditioning and Fireplaces will serve barbecue.

Live music will be provided by Front Porch Flavor from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m., Lakoda from 2:45 to 4:15 p.m. and the Barking Owls from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

“It’s fun, if you like beer, this is the way to go because you get to try new beers without buying a six pack or whole growler,” said Denise Young, a member of Blue Lake Rotary Club and the Beer Fest planning committee.

Besides eating and drinking, people can also try their luck at winning several items in the silent auction and raffle. Young said there will be hunting trips, fishing poles, beer making kits, bicycles and a Pabst Blue Ribbon wakeboard up for grabs.

There will also be a lifesize Jenga game and a bean bag toss set up in the park.

And if you do happen to have too many drinks or think you should take a taxi home, Carpenter said taxi rides will be available to anywhere in Twin Falls for $5.

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Jul 31, 2014
Freddie Kitson

BeerFest at the ballpark

Beer lovers, mark your calendars for Charlotte BeerFest, which will be held September 20 at BBT Ballpark.

Featured breweries will include OMB, Foothills, SweetWater, Oskar Blues, Natty Greene’s, Leinenkugel’s, D9 Brewery, Stella Artois, Magic Hat, Blue Moon, RJ Rockers, Goose Island and many others.

 “We are excited to host the inaugural Charlotte BeerFest and look forward to showcasing some of the world’s finest brews for the area’s beer enthusiasts,” said Charlotte BeerFest Executive Director Chris Boukedes. “We’re proud to celebrate this culture of craftsmanship and artisan brewing.”

A portion of the proceeds from the event will benefit Ace TJ’s Grin Kids and the USO of North Carolina.

 “It’s certainly a privilege and an honor to host this event,” said Dan Rajkowski, executive vice president and COO for the Charlotte Knights. “We’ve had a lot of functions going on throughout BBT Ballpark, but the Charlotte BeerFest will probably be the premier largest one that we will have in our first year, so we are looking forward to it.”

With more than 110 breweries (and counting), North Carolina is one of the top 5 fastest-growing states in the nation for craft brewing. As the industry grows, Charlotte is quickly becoming a hotspot for beer enthusiasts.

“Charlotte has a tremendously fast-growing craft beer community,” said John Marrino, founder of OMB, Charlotte’s oldest brewery. “Five years ago there were no breweries in Charlotte. Now we have eight with several more on the way… The beautiful thing about craft beer is that it’s best when it’s fresh. So when it’s made locally, it’s fantastic.”

Marrino said beer festivals are a great way to introduce locals to the world of craft beer, which he said makes up only one percent of the Charlotte beer market.

“Beer is a wonderful food,” said Marrino. “It’s good for you, and it makes people smile. A festival like this just enhances that.”

Ray Goodrich, director of marketing and communications for Foothills Brewing, said given the opportunity to try hundreds of different craft beers in one setting, attendees are guaranteed to find at least one beer that they like.

“It’s really exciting to try something new,” he said. “Everybody’s always worried about calories, but the taste is really a great trade off.”

The festival will feature a variety of food, adult fun (must be 21 and older to enter) and live music with performances by the Grammy Award-winning band Blues Traveler along with local acts Simplified and Charity Case.

General admission tickets are $50 and include unlimited beer samples, a sampling cup and access to all performances, special beer-themed activities and contests. VIP tickets are $100 and include additional benefits such as expedited entry at the gates, VIP area, private beer tasting with exclusive craft beers, a gift bag and entry to an exclusive VIP hospitality suite.

Visit www.charlottebeerfest.com for more information or to purchase tickets.

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Jul 31, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Pintful: Across the pond, thirst is growing for American craft beer

Under a bright summer sun, craft beer fans moved from tent to tent sampling American ales, California commons and West Coast India pale ales.

A food truck rodeo anchored one end, a stage the other. A guy in a shirt from a popular Colorado brewery mingled in the crowd. The speakers blared Dolly Parton’s “Jolene.”

For a moment, it felt like Hickory Hops, or any of the other great outdoor craft beer festivals in North Carolina. But I stumbled upon this one 4,000 miles from home while on vacation in Barcelona, Spain.

The surreal experience across the Atlantic Ocean at the La Fira del Poblenou spoke to the growing thirst abroad for American-style craft brews – not to mention the small-world craft beer community.

The Brewers Association, an industry trade group, recently reported American craft beer exports increased 49 percent in 2013 to 282,500 barrels and an estimated $73 million.

The growth in Europe is particularly intriguing given that American brewers drew their inspiration from their predecessors in beer-soaked regions of Germany, Belgium and the Czech Republic.

Spain is not known for its craft beer. But the country’s tastes are beginning to change.

“The beer scene is super strong and growing here,” Alan Sheppard, the head brewer at Edge Brewing in Barcelona, told me at the festival. “It’s like the states in ’96-’97.”

The Florida native said he opened a 15-barrel operation in January that brews American-style beers, such as his Flor de la Vida (Flower of Life) American Pale Ale, to “bring the craft beer revolution to Spain.”

“Everybody just wants American-style West Coast IPAs over here,” Sheppard said.

(In Spanish, he told me, an IPA is pronounced “eee-pa.” Craft beer is known as cervesa artesana and a brewery is a cerveseria.)

It turned out Sheppard previously worked for a brewing equipment company and helped install Starpoint Brewery’s system in Carrboro. (“He’s a great guy,” said Starpoint’s Tim Harper when I later recounted the connection.) He later sent me to a great craft beer bar, La Cerveteca, where a beer cooler featured a Carolina Brewery sticker. (“This is our hometown brewery,” my excited wife tried to tell the non-English-speaking bartender in a broken Spanish that left him confused but smiling.)

A few tents down from Sheppard at the festival, Peter Brown, a co-owner at BeerCat, another new local brewery, said the craft beer scene in Spain was nonexistent five years ago. And it remains a small portion of sales, despite the growth.

Most bars in Spain feature only one or two taps and universally pour flavorless light lagers such as Estrella (“es-stray-ya”) and Mahou (rhymes with “cow”).

“Spain drinks the third-largest volume of beer in the world but … beer is seen as just something to cleanse your palate. It’s clear, fizzy and cold,” said Brown, a British lawyer who now lives in Barcelona. “So we need to retrain palates. It’s getting traction.”

What I’m tasting

Back in North Carolina, a few Spanish craft beers are now appearing in select bottle shops.

At Beer Study in Chapel Hill, I found Bernabé 11 from Mateo and Bernabé, a craft brewer from the La Rioja region in Northern Spain.

The golden ale tasted sweet and lightly fruity. It’s a good illustration of Spanish craft beer – good but not yet great.

Contact John at 919-829-4698 or jfrank@newsobserver.com.

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Jul 31, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Doctor Fermento: August brings the start of beer festival season

Being an avid local craft beer lover, I chase beer festivals with abandon. No, I haven’t been to every annual beer festival in the state, but those that I haven’t visited are high on my must-attend list.

The primary deterrents for the festivals I’ve yet to attend are time and cost since most of them are beyond driving distance and involve air travel and overnight accommodations, at a minimum.

I attend beer festivals for reasons that go beyond sheer enjoyment. Most festivals support a good cause, and the brewers that attend them almost always donate their beer. I’m not a cause junkie by any means, but my attendance is a vote of confidence for the local breweries that I love, and I like to support the causes that are important to them.

The Sept. 13 Capital Brewfest is a good example. This one’s on my “yet to attend” list, but maybe this is the year. This is the gig’s third year, and it’s hosted by the Rotary of Juneau. In years past, it has benefitted SAGA. I don’t have a whole bunch of intel on this year’s event but suspect it will be the same. Regardless, it’s one of the few beer festivals that are “in the ‘hood” so to speak, and it’s definitely worthy of your attendance.

The fest takes place 1-5 p.m. at the Juneau Arts and Culture Center. Tickets will set you back $32.50 but get you admission, a commemorative glass and unlimited 2-ounce samples. Unlimited samples are pretty great for a beer festival; I don’t see too many festivals organized this way, but who’s complaining? Alaskan Brewing Company will obviously factor in huge at this gig, but the state’s other breweries will be equally represented. Check out the information at capbrewfest.com and on Facebook.

Closer to me here in Los Anchorage are a number of other cool fests you might consider if you happen to be up this. The most imminent, and undeniably my favorite, is the 3rd Annual 49th State Brewing Company’s Augtoberfest that takes place Friday, Aug. 1 and Saturday, Aug. 2 at the brewery’s expansive grounds in Healy.

Though I wouldn’t call driving to Healy from Anchorage casual (it’s a haul at right around 250 miles), it can be spectacular if the weather cooperates. When the skies are clear, the crowning fireweed backlit by the sun and sweeping vistas of Denali reward the festgoer on the way up. This can come at a cost – driving south into the sun with a hangover on a bleary-eyed Sunday morning.

This year, as part of the gig, you can get a discount ticket and experience the incredible scenery from the big windows of an Alaska Railroad passenger car as it threads its way north through some of Alaska’s most rugged backcountry if you don’t feel like driving.

When I attend, I stay at the Park’s Edge Log Cabins, just off the highway and over a little hill in Healy. No, this isn’t a shameless plug. I’ll be the first to admit the view from there isn’t spectacular and it’s off the beaten path on a dusty road (there are bed and breakfasts and accommodations closer to the brewery grounds), but that’s the allure.

Returning to the cabin at night at 2 a.m. rewarded me with the most uncanny silence I’ve ever experienced on Earth. I was really struck by the complete absence of sound, and it was nice after spending the night in a rowdy crowd twisting to music by some of my favorite local bands.

Better yet, a simple phone call fetched a brewery transport van that drove me down the dusty road and up the short distance to the brewery, freeing me of the hassle of worrying about driving intoxicated. This is a double-edged sword for me because having transportation is a license to rage and I always tend to overconsume as a result.

The brewery is encompassed by and accessed through a huge Bavarian-mimicking beer garden with a grand stage, outdoor dining areas, a horseshoe pit, fire pit and plenty of room to roam. An indoor pub is warm and inviting when the weather’s cool and dark and cool when it’s hot outside.

A central, circular hooded fire pit provides a nice touch to the very homey enclave. The menu’s robust and varied and serves some of the finest food in the area during the short months that the establishment is open along the otherwise barren stretch of highway connecting Anchorage to Fairbanks. An authentic Bavarian menu is featured during Augtoberfest along with O’fest-themed specialty beers.

Tickets for this no-miss event are $25 for the first day ($30 at the gate), $15 for the second day ($20 at the gate) or you can get a weekend pass for $35 ($40 at the gate). Surf out to 49statebrewing.com to get your tickets in advance and poke around for lodging at the same time.

Another excellent fest that’s coming up is the 4th Annual Kenai Peninsula Beer Festival at the Soldotna Sports Center from 5-10 p.m. Oct. 9. Tickets are $30, which scores you eight four-ounce samples and a commemorative tasting glass. Yeah, I know, eight samples might seem a little paltry for a five-hour fest, but you can buy additional sampling tickets at two for $3 or $15 for 12.

What really sets this fest apart is it may be the most casual and most disciplined beer event in the state. There never seems to be any bad karma at this laid-back gig that’s outside and appointed with all manner of food and craft booths and live music to keep things going. It feels like going to a Saturday market with a beer.

Most of the Kenai Peninsula breweries will be on hand, including Kassik’s Brewery, Kenai River Brewing Company, St. Elias Brewing and maybe Homer Brewing Company as well. Of course, other breweries from across the state will be represented, as will national and especially Pacific Northwest beers provided by our local distributors.

You can snag your tickets online at https://events.admitoneproducts.com/tkt_sales.php?test=trueevent_id=823214sales=. You’ll want to plan ahead as the fish are running and you might have to get creative for accommodations.

Feeling really adventurous? Check out the Oct. 17-19 Yukon Beer Festival in Whitehorse. I’ve never been to a Canadian beer festival before, and this might be my first one. It’s distant, but probably no worse than driving to the Haines Beer Festival in May every year. Check out Yukon Beer Festival on Facebook for more information.

At the same time, and much closer to home for me is the Eagle River Beer Festival at the Boys and Girls Club on Oct. 17-18. This is one of the rowdiest beer festivals in the Anchorage area, and I love the feel of it when I attend. The time and cost has not been announced, so keep your mug to the wall. Other events to keep an eye out for include Bodegafest in Anchorage and the Mighty Matanuska Beer Fest at the Alaska State Fairgrounds.

The bottom line is that there’s no need to let your meat loaf and leave your mug idle. Make plans to get out there and support good local craft beer.

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Jul 30, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Listermann Brewing spices up summer with Volksfest beer festival

CINCINNATI — If you want to escape the crowds at LumenoCity, then you should head to Norwood this weekend for one of the region’s most unique beer festivals.

The Listermann Brewing Company is hosting its second annual Volksfest beer fest on Friday and Saturday.

Volksfest features all of Cincinnati’s local breweries and focuses on summer beers. That means lower ABVs and refreshing summer flavors.

The location is a little bit different this year. Instead of the parking lot adjacent to the brewery, Listermann’s has shifted the festival to a brick lot just a bit behind the brewery.

volksfest map

There will be live music and food all day and the celebration goes from Friday at 5 p.m. until midnight and Saturday from noon until 11 p.m.

The ceremonial keg tapping of the Listermann Volksfest Lager will be held at 4 p.m.

The breweries involved are: Blank Slate, Fifty West, Christian Morelein, Rock Bottom, Rivertown, Mt. Carmel, Madtree, Cellar Dweller, Wiedemann, Quaff Bros, Rhinegeist, Triple Digit, Bad Tom Smith and Listermann. Some of the breweries are made beers just for Volksfest.

RELATED: Hops onboard! Brew tours ramble through Cincy
MORE: Beat the heat with these Top 9 local summer beers

The Cincideutsch organization is helping run the event and it will feature local home brew clubs — such as the The Bloatarian Brewing League — cultural societies and more.

Similar to the Oktoberfest and Starkbier Fest held by Listermann, the event is family and dog friendly. On Saturday, Adore-A-Bull Rescue will be hosting an adoption event.

Some of the special beers #9beer will be looking for include:

  • Blank Slate’s Ryesing Up
  • Cellar Dweller’s Ryno’s
  • Christian Moerlein’s Altered wheat
  • Mad Tree’s Tiamet
  • Rhinegeist’s Squirt
  • Rock Bottom’s Summer Honey

…. just to name a few.

volksfest beerfest

Click the photo for a complete beer list

Listermann’s is also still accepting volunteers to help serve beer and more during the event. Any beer fans who are interested can call 513-731-1130.

For the latest Cincinnati beer news and entertainment, go to wcpo.com/beer or follow Jesse on Twitter at @wcpojesse .

You can take part in the conversation at our #9beer Facebook page too!

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Jul 30, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Craft Beer Scene Around Rockford: A look back at Milwaukee’s Firkin Fest

By Michael Sears
President, Forest City Brewers

Greetings, all!

What beautiful weather we have experienced lately. It’s just the type of weather that begs for us to enjoy some craft beer in the great outdoors, so make sure you stop into your favorite bar or restaurant that has a nice outdoor seating area and bring some friends.

Speaking of craft beer in the great outdoors, if you remember my article from June 25, I talked about some of the beer festivals coming up. Well, the weekend of July 19, my wife and I breached the Cheddar Curtain for a trip to Milwaukee, more specifically to attend Firkin Fest. This was the first time we have attended, so we did not know what to expect. Let me tell you, it was a great experience.

Saturday afternoon, we checked into our hotel nearby the festival (no driving after one of these events). It was a little early before the festival started, so we decided to walk around the area a bit. Downtown Milwaukee near the riverwalk is a real neat area, as it is full of restaurants, bars and things to do. It is also very beautiful with the many old cathedrals and ornate bell towers.

We came upon a small park, and in the park was the Sprecher Brewery fire truck, complete with nine taps … nirvana! We decided to stop by for a quick pint, and started some small talk with the bartender. She was telling us during the summer months they are there every Monday through Saturday in the early afternoon serving beer and lunch. Only in Milwaukee!

After finishing our beers, we headed over to the festival, which was a short four blocks away. Once inside, it was a cozy environment — not overcrowded, as some festivals are — on grass with plenty of trees providing shade. The weather was splendid, sunny and upper 70s, perfect for sampling beer.

Our first stop was to sample some mead (my wife’s favorite) from Bos Meadery. They had six different meads, but our favorite was the Pomegranate Pymet. Quite the start, as most of these were 8 percent or above!

We made our way around the rest of the festival, which consisted of 54 breweries featuring 210 beers, 46 of which were on cask and four homebrew clubs pouring their own beers. Some of our favorites and not-so-favorites were, in no particular order: Nutty Cherry on cask from the Milwaukee Beer Barons homebrew club, 2 Hearted Ale on cask from Bells Brewery (super delicious), a very interesting Blue Cheese Amber (yes, blue cheese) and Kolsch from Bell City Homebrew club, Bacon Bomb Rauchbier from Brenner Brewery (would have been better without the smoked malts, which gave an off flavor of phenols/medicinal), Peruvian Morning Imperial Stout with coffee on cask from Central Waters Brewery (very good), Rubaeus raspberry flavored from Founders Brewery, Elliot Ness Red Lager from Great Lakes Brewery, Cherry Lager from Lakefront Brewery (nice and refreshing), a Rye beer from Milwaukee/Chicago Area homebrew club, Coffee Stout from New Glarus Brewery, an interesting IPA infused with red pepper flakes from North Shore homebrew club, an Abbey Triple from Sprecher Brewery, Double Stout on cask from Tyranena Brewery, a Chocolate Cherry Milk Stout from Waukesha Homebrew Club (very well done and tasty, one of my wife’s favorites).

Last, but certainly not least, was a beer from Founders Brewery, which was a wheat wine aged in bourbon barrels for 16 months, then blended, called Sweet Repute. Oh my, so complex and many flavors! A truly great beer, but alas, this was a limited release from 2013 and cannot be found again. At least I had the pleasure of a few precious sips.

Prost!

Michael Sears is president of the Forest City Brewers. The Forest City Brewers is a homebrewing club dedicated to the art of finely crafted beer. The club meets the first Wednesday of each month at Thunder Bay Grille on East State Sreet. For more about Forest City Brewers, go to http://forestcitybrewers.org. If you have comments or recommendations, please contact Mike at rockfordcraftbeer@comcast.net.

From the July 30-Aug. 5, 2014, issue

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Jul 29, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Buzz: World Beer Festival returns

For the 19th year in a row, The World Beer Festival will be held in Durham on Oct. 11 in the Durham Bulls Athletic Park.

The festival, produced by All About Beer Magazine, has reduced tickets available by 35 percent and raised the price to relieve crowding, said Daniel Bradford, producer of the World Beer Festivals.

“We’re also restructuring how we handle beer acquisition,” Bradford said. “So we will be able to hand-select the breweries.”

The Food Bank of Central Eastern North Carolina will be the charity beneficiary of the event.

General admission tickets are $55 and include a tasting glass to sample from over 200 international beers. VIP tickets are $70 and offer a private air-conditioned hospitality area with private bathrooms and a bonus selection of beers.

***

Pho restaurant at Southpoint: According to recent government filings, restaurant chain Pholicious will be coming to the Streets at Southpoint.
The company filed its articles of incorporation with the name “Pholicious at Street of Southpoint, Inc.”
According to its website, Pholicious is located in Florida, Kentucky, Virginia, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Massachusetts, Texas, Oklahoma and Georgia, making the potential Southpoint location the first in North Carolina. The restaurant specializes in Pho, a Vietnamese noodle soup.

***

Chick-fil-A mobile pay: After launching a mobile payment test in the Triad area earlier this year, Chick-fil-A is testing it throughout 30 locations in the Triangle.
Customers can download the app from iTunes or Google Play. Then, customers register for an account with credit card information and pay by scanning a code at the register or drive thru, which deducts the cost from the account balance.
“In addition to being a convenience for customers, we believe the mobile payment feature will help with speed of service as well,” said Lori Allred, franchise Operator of the Holly Springs Chick-fil-A restaurant in a release. “Our guests no longer have to look through their purses or wallets. They will have payment readily available on their smart phone.”

***

Jewelry shop closes: Gioia on Ninth announced that it will be closing on Aug. 6.
The jewelry store and fashion boutique at 738 Ninth St. has been open nearly a year.
According to Gioia’s social media account, the store is holding a storewide sale until the closing.
Owner Cristina Scamardella declined to comment on the closing.

***

New furniture store: Furnish This, an independent furniture store, has opened at 3109 Hillsborough Road.
Owner and founder Tyler Singleton said the store focuses on North Carolina furniture brands with at or below wholesale pricing.
The store, which opened on July 21, specializes in showroom samples and closeouts.
“What I have on my floor is what I’ve got,” Singleton said.
Singleton, a 2010 UNC-Chapel Hill alumnus, spent nearly four years managing a gold and diamond mining operation in South America before recently returning to Durham.

Have an item for The Buzz? Contact Alex Dixon at amdixon7@gmail.com or at 919-419-6684.
 

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Jul 29, 2014
Freddie Kitson

London Beer Festival Roundup: August 2014

Beer By The River

Hot weather and cold (or cellar temperature) beer are well-established bedfellows, so it’s no surprise that August features plenty of great opportunities for combining the two. We’ve summarised some of London’s more notable beery gatherings here, but feel free to let us know in the comments if we’ve missed anything compelling.

1-3 August: Epping Ongar Railway Beer Festival

OK so this isn’t really in London, but you can get there on the tube (more-or-less) and, more importantly, YOU GET TO DRINK BEER AND RIDE ON A STEAM TRAIN. More specifically, 40 real ales, eight ciders, and various heritage steam and diesel trains combine for the purpose of great nerdy satisfaction at North Weald station this weekend. Tickets cost £13 (£11 for CAMRA members), see the website for more details.

9-16 August: London Beer City

Comprising a week of events celebrating beer and brewers in the capital, London Beer City intends to “take the excitement of a beer festival into every corner of the city”. The busy schedule features walks, talks, bike tours, ‘live brews’, open days, music, pop-ups, barbecues, themed tastings, a ‘beer school’ and, of course, lots and lots of lovely beer. You won’t be able to attend every event, but it’s worth trying to catch a few.

12-16 August: The Great British Beer Festival

CAMRA’s Great British Beer Festival returns to Olympia in customarily colossal style. A compulsory fixture in every London-dwelling beer lover’s calendar, this year’s festival promises some big numbers: 900 beers, 50,000 attendees, 350 breweries, and so on. Based on previous years, big bellies and grizzly beards are also to be expected. Tickets cost £10 (or £8 for CAMRA members). We’ll be running a dedicated preview later this week.

14-17 August: London Craft Beer Festival

Returning for its second year, the London Craft Beer Festival at Bethnal Green’s Oval Space provides the opportunity to taste ‘small serves’ of many different beers with a £35 all-inclusive ticket. We observed last year that this festival provides a deliberately quite different alternative to the Great British Beer Festival, and it looks like this year’s event will be no different in that respect.

30 August: Beer By The River

Battersea-based brewer Sambrooks has teamed up with the National Trust for this one-day event set in Morden Hall Park. Beer (obviously), food, music and tranquil surroundings are promised in exchange for a £10 ticket. The river in question is the Wandle, which flows through Morden Hall Park, and also lends its name to Sambrooks’s flagship beer.

Also…

In addition to the events mentioned above, several London pubs are conducting smaller beer festivals next month. Highgate’s brewpub The Bull is celebrating pale ales and IPAs in their Beyond the Pale festival from 14-17 August, Stratford’s Tap East will be launching some new collaborative brews in their Open Brewhouse Beer Festival from 22-24 August, and The Red Lion in Isleworth will hold their summer beer festival from 22-25 August.

If you’re a lover of beer or pubs, why not buy the Londonist book of London pub crawls for less than the price of a pint.

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Jul 28, 2014
Freddie Kitson

St. Louis supports local brewers during craft beer week

ST. LOUIS, MO (KTVI) – The St. Louis Craft Beer Week is well underway as it enters Monday.

The week long event started on Saturday with events at Macklind Avenue Deli, Wine Shop Tasting Bar, Six Row Brewing Company, The Moto Museum, Everything Wine Cigars and Three Kings. Sunday events were held at the Milagro Modern Mexican, Urban Chestnut Brewing Company, International Taphouse (Soulard), Craft Beer Cellar, Everything Wine Cigar, The Libertine and the Three Kings.

Urban Chestnut Brewing Company, off of Washington Avenue in St. Louis, had live music from Tommy Halloran and Brian Curran, outside seating in their biergarten and a pork roast. Along with the roast, Andrew’s Bayou Ribs was present with their delicious ribs.

iTap in Soulard, featured special beers for the event: 4 Hands Pomegranate Prussia, Perennial Anniversari, Bottles of Love Child, Gueze Tilquin, Jolly Pumpkin La Roja and HaandBryggeriet Haandbakk. A DJ was on hand to keep the atmosphere alive.

The St. Louis Craft Beer Week  is a great chance to venture out and try new beers and support St. Louis craft breweries.

Throughout the week there will be tap takeovers, beer dinners, beer festivals, celebrations, free keep the glass, and many more types of events.

For more information and a complete schedule of events visit STLBeerWeek.com

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