Browsing articles tagged with " beer festivals"
Aug 13, 2014
Freddie Kitson

5 Ski Resort Beer Festivals Not to Miss

Skiers dig beer. So it’s no surprise that a number of beer festivals are held at ski resorts. Most in the summer and fall, but occasionally one pops up while there’s snow still on the ground. Personally I love the idea of a ski-in beer fest. I also enjoy good food and music, which most beer festivals feature as well. Pretty much a perfect mix!

Ski resorts offer large open venues, great views, and a population of eager enthusiasts (AKA skiers) ready to knock back a few pints.

Google “beer festival” along with your state to find festivals near you, including those hosted off-resort. Here are five to get you started:

Blue’s Brew Fest

August 16, 2014

Times: 12:00pm-4:00pm

Location: The Valley, Blue Mountain Ski Area, Palmerton, Pennsylvania

Admission: $30/in advance, $35/at the door

Situated in the beautiful Pocono Mountains, the Blue’s Brew Fest combines fun revelry and music with a beautiful destination–perfect for a weekend getaway!

“Blue’s Brew Fest features a wide variety of local microbrews, craft beer and some of your favorite domestic and imports! Enjoy live music with the Doc from Penn’s Peak Radio and craft and specialty vendors!”

Breck Oktoberfest

September 12 – 14, 2014

Times: 9/12 – 2:00pm-6:00pm, 9/13 – 10:00am-6:00pm, 9/14 – 10:00am-5:00pm

Location: Breckenridge, Colorado

Admission (including stein): Half Liter Stein – 1 Day $30/Full Liter Stein – 1 day $35

One of several Oktoberfests around the country, Breckenridge is sure to do it up right. Let’s face it, how can you miss with schnitzel and beer?

“Breckenridge’s 20th annual Oktoberfest, September 12-14, 2014, includes a fun-filled weekend of fall foliage, great parties, genuine German cuisine, collectible steins and special accommodation packages. Don’t miss the largest Oktoberfest in the Rocky Mountains.”

2014-08-12-BreckenridgePhotoRobinJohnson_gobreck.jpg
PHOTO: Breckenridge, Robin Johnson

Snowbird Oktoberfest

Aug. 16 – Oct. 12, Every Saturday – Sunday

Times: 12:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Location: Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort, Snowbird, Utah (Near Salt Lake City)

Admission: FREE

Another fun Oktoberfest, held annually since 1973, Snowbird’s event is one of the largest festivals in Utah. Nosh on German food, dance, and sample some of Utah’s finest local brew. While you’re there, be sure to ride the tram to the top of Hidden Peak, especially at sunset.

2014-08-12-PhotoSnowbirdSkiandSummerResort.jpg
PHOTO: Snowbird Ski and Summer Resort

Mt. Crested Butte Chili and Beer Festival

September 20, 2014

Times: 12:00pm – ?

Location: Crested Butte Mountain Resort, Colorado

Admission: Chili Beer Ticket $25 in advance/$30 at gate

Here’s your chance to get high (elevation 9,375 feet, what were YOU thinking?). Drink beer, eat chili, and relax to laid-back tunes. This is the 16th consecutive Mt. Crested Butte Chili and Beer Festival and it sounds like a blast! They have several ticket packages to choose from so be sure to visit their website to order in advance.

“Sample locally made chilis, sip some of Colorado’s finest craft beer, and enjoy some great tunes from great bands.”

Brew-Ski Festival

Saturday, March 14, 2015

Times: 12:00pm-5:00pm

Location: Boyne Highlands Resort, Harbor Springs, Michigan

Admission: FREE

Here’s where powder meets a frothy mug! They even have weekend packages including lodging, breakfast, Friday night hors d’oeuvres, and lift tickets.

“Hit the slopes, share laughter with friends and join us at our sampling bars where brewery representatives share their enthusiasm, and 240 brews from around the U.S. When you’ve satisfied your thirst, take in some live music while your favorite brats and burgers reach tasty perfection on nearby grills…”

2014-08-12-BrewSkiFestival2013PhotocreditBOYNE.jpg
PHOTO: Brew Ski Festival 2013, BOYNE

Still looking for more brew-fest options? Here is a great collection gathered by BeerFestivals.org of beer festivals help across the country:

Beer Festival Calendar

This post originally ran on the Liftopia blog.

By Erika Wiggins, The Active Explorer (@Active_Explorer)

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Aug 12, 2014
Freddie Kitson

GOODS | New “Red Dawn Saison” Released By Penticton’s ‘Cannery Brewing …

August 11, 2014 

Cannery Brewing is located at 112 – 1475 Fairview Rd. in Penticton, BC | 250-493-2723 | cannerybrewing.com

Cannery Brewing is located at 112 – 1475 Fairview Rd. in Penticton, BC | 250-493-2723 | cannerybrewing.com

The GOODS from Cannery Brewing Company

Penticton, BC | A new dawn is here. It’s a red dawn. A Red Dawn Saison! And it’s the latest limited release in the Artisan Creations series from Penticton’s Cannery Brewing.

French for “season”, Saisons were originally brewed during the cooler temperatures from autumn to early spring in order to be ready for the scorching heat of summer. Jeff Canada, who is part of the brewing team at Cannery Brewing, took the lead on the brewing of this fresh, crisp ale. “We had a great time testing out a variety of different options for the Red Dawn Saison. We wanted to create a saison that was unique in flavour, colour and finish. I think we did just that with this highly individualistic quintessential artisanal brew. Its unique red colour leads to a surprisingly dry finish. At 5.5% alc./vol. and 28 IBU’s, it’s the perfect beer to help quench a major thirst this summer.”

Inspired by pieces of art or photography, the labels for Cannery Brewing’s new Artisan Creations line-up are artistic creations that match the artistry of these beers. Jeff explained, “We looked at a lot of possible images for this label. When we saw this photo (above) from Kaarel Mikkin of www.headpead.com, we all fell in love with it instantly! We feel the artistic nature of this image is perfectly paired with the artistic nature of this new beer.”

Cannery Brewing’s Red Dawn Saison is a single batch release that will be available at private liquor stores and restaurants throughout BC until it is gone. It is already sold out at the brewery, so don’t delay. For a list of private liquor stores carrying the Red Dawn Saison, click here.

For more information on Cannery Brewing or any of its fine hand-crafted ales and lagers, visit www.CanneryBrewing.com, follow them on Facebook, Twitter and YouTube, call 250.493.2723 or drop by and see them in the Brewery, which is located in Penticton, British Columbia.

DETAILS

112 – 1475 Fairview Rd. | Penticton, BC | V2A 7W5
Telephone: 250-493-2723
Email: info@CanneryBrewing.com
Web: www.CanneryBrewing.com | Facebook | Twitter | Youtube

GALLERY

Cannery Brewing CompanyMaple Stout | Cannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyLakeboat Lager | Cannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyAnarchist | Cannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing CompanyCannery Brewing Company

THE PEOPLE

Owners: Patt and Ron Dyck
Brew Team: A passionate group of beer crazy souls.

ABOUT CANNERY BREWING

Located amidst the breath taking scenery of Penticton, British Columbia, our micro-brewery produces individually hand-crafted fine ales and lagers of unmistakable complexity and balance.  This flavour is the result of wonderful combinations of premium quality malted grains and carefully chosen Pacific Northwest hops. Cannery Brewing is the Small Brewery with Big Flavour!

All of our beers are created with carefully selected and scrutinized ingredients.  We use the finest hops and malted barleys and only the finest yeast strains.  Our brews are all natural.  They contain no preservatives and are not pasteurized.  You get a fresh, crisp taste every time.

We brewed our first batch of beer in the Old Aylmer Fruit and Vegetable Cannery in Penticton on April Fool’s Day, 2001.  It did seem like an auspicious day for the start of a brewery that would be dedicated to enjoyment (not to mention the odd practical joke!). In the beginning, we brewed and sold beer in kegs for local restaurants, pubs and clubs.  After that came the wonderful 8.5 litre Party Pigs of beer that flew out our doors. (Our pigs do fly!)

In 2011, we celebrated our 10th anniversary and our 1000th brew! Today we sell our beers in 650ml bottles, 355ml cans, on tap, in Party Pigs and we recently launched a new Growler program. A Growler is a reusable, glass 2L bottle that can be filled at our brewery.

AWARDS ACCOLADES

Over the years, we have been fortunate to receive a number of different awards at various beer festivals throughout the country. We were thrilled when we won a Gold Medal for our Squire Scotch Ale and a Silver Medal for our Naramata Nut Brown Ale as part of the 2010 Canadian Brewing Awards.

Cheers All Around For Penticton’s Cannery Brewing | Penticton Western News

Cannery Brewing Strikes Gold At CBAs | Beer Geek

Squire Scotch Ale A Gentleman’s Affair | Bryehn.ca

Cannery Brewing India Pale Ale: Now this is an IPA! | BCandy

Naramata Namesake Gets Award At Beer Fest | My Naramata

———————————————————————–


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Aug 12, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Dover Downs preparing for Beer Festival

DOVER, Del. (AP) — When Dover Downs Hotel Casino first launched its craft beer-themed Brew Festival four years ago, there were about 1,800 craft breweries in the country. These days, there are more than 2,700 and the number keeps ticking up.

That same explosive growth is happening right here in Delaware with new breweries and beer festivals popping up every year.

The expansion of Delaware’s craft beer culture has been so rapid that Lindsey Timberman, the Pike Creek publisher of the Delaware Hop Scene website, can hardly keep up.

“It’s been insane. It’s neat to see, but it’s kind of mind-boggling,” says Timberman, who started the website with her boyfriend Eric Roberts in 2012. “We used to go to Philadelphia once a month, but we have no need to now because there is so much happening right here in Delaware. There is always something going on.”

For next weekend’s Brew Festival in Dover, which runs Aug. 16 from 4-8 p.m., a record number of 1,000 people are expected. Each year, the number of attendees has grown right along with the beer scene in the First State, says George Fiorile, vice president and general manager of hotel operations at Dover Downs Hotel Casino.

Twenty-one breweries from across the country, including Delaware’s own 3rd Wave Brewing Company (Delmar), Fordham Old Dominion Breweries (Dover), 16 Mile Brewery (Georgetown), Twin Lakes Brewing Co. (Greenville), Mispillion River Brewing (Milford) and Dogfish Head Craft Brewery (Milton), will be represented. Nearly 100 different beers will be available for tasting.

For $25, beer lovers get 10 drink tickets and a souvenir glass for guzzling at the hotel’s Rollins Center, the 18,000-square-foot ballroom that hosts everything from concerts to boxing matches. (Designated drivers get in for $15 and get unlimited soda.)

The hotel’s chefs have also whipped up some off-centered finger foods to pair with the brews. There will be items like peanut butter and jelly waffles and “mac and cheese bombs” in three flavors, including feta and spinach, bacon burger and hot dog.

The hotel will also unveil a new concoction – a stout-battered waffle dog and it’s exactly what you think it is: waffle batter infused with a stout cooked around a hot dog.

In addition to the food and drink, Bear-based island folk/rock act The Splashing Pearls will perform, giving the festivities a cool groove backdrop.

Fiorile says the decision to host a craft beer festival was a no-brainer due to its popularity in the state. Plus, it draws a crowd largely in the 25 to 35 age group, some of whom are checking out the hotel and casino for the first time.

With the fourth annual Brew Festival now joined by more than a dozen annual beer festivals across Delaware, it’s nearly a full-time job for Timberman to keep an up-to-date calendar of Delaware craft beer events on her website.

“Very rarely is there a day in the month when there is not something going on and that speaks volumes about the craft beer scene in Delaware. When we started, we had a Facebook page and hoped to get a couple of hundred people. We’re now up to 2,200 likes,” she says. “It’s a lot to keep up with, but it’s the coolest thing to keep up with because it’s fun.

“It’s beer. Who doesn’t like to talk about beer?”

___

Information from: The News Journal of Wilmington, Del., http://www.delawareonline.com

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Aug 12, 2014
Freddie Kitson

10 tips for a great bottle share

SO MUCH craft beer. So little time.

Attending beer festivals or ordering flights of beer from bars are great ways to expand your knowledge and palate. These opportunities provide several small pours of beer instead of the traditional method of ordering full-size glasses.

Or, you can throw your own mini-beer festival by organizing a bottle share.

Calling up a few like-minded friends to engage in a Saturday beer tasting is a perfect excuse to intermingle different circles of acquaintances and tick a few new beers off of your own “must try” list, as every attendee brings some of their own personal stock to pour.

Here are some guidelines for planning.

1. The more the merrier.

While your initial instinct may be to keep your tasting group small, expanding the number of participants means that you’ll have more varieties of beer to try. Different people have different preferences and this will force you out of your comfort zone to try beers that you typically may not purchase on your own. A larger group of attendees also increases the number of rarities or beers acquired from regional travel and trades.

2. Bottle limits strictly enforced.

Along with the invitation, place a limit on how many different bottles invitees can bring. It’s easy to get carried away, especially if you’ve taken the time to assemble an impressive cellar of rare beers that you’d like to show off. But, to imbibe responsibly, make sure you and your attendees follow a bottle limit policy. This keeps the pours small and allows the group to enjoy the beer without things getting out of control.

3. Variety is the spice of life.

Keep things interesting by cultivating a bottle list that spans styles and geography. As the organizer, ask everyone what they plan on bringing in advance. That way, you can help prevent duplication of bottles or too many beers representing the same style or from the same brewery. The exception to this rule would be planning a themed party, such as Russian Imperial Stouts or beers from Oregon, for example.

4. Sequence your drinking “playlist.”

When deciding the drinking order for the beers, think about each beer as a song in an epic mix tape. While traditional logic may indicate you should save the best for last, the fact of the matter is that your taste buds aren’t going to be as fresh at the end of the night. Start off with something exciting, put another big beer in the middle and, yes, finish strong. In between those key bottles, mix up the styles to keep everyone guessing.

5. Take your time.

A bottle share is not a race. Depending on the number of bottles being shared and size of the pours, you will probably want to allot the majority of the day to slowly drink through your supply. The goal here is to taste and enjoy these different beers. You do that by sipping slowly, taking notes and discussing the flavors with your peers.

6. Hydration, hydration, hydration.

Drink water. Drink lots of water. A good rule of thumb is to drink a full glass of water for every sample pour. This staves off the symptoms of dehydration like headaches and stomach issues as well as prevents the ever-dreaded next day hangover.

7. Snack attack.

Leave out serving bowls filled with pretzels, nuts or chips. If hosting an all-day event, make a plan for take-out or pizza delivery during meal times. Palate-cleansing snacks like unsalted crackers and mild fruit allow you to taste with a fresh tongue.

8. Show your appreciation.

From the newbie who brings an uninspiring shelf-warmer to the experienced trader sharing a rare, hard-won prize, encourage each other and say thank you. Craft beer drinkers are a supportive community. That comes from sharing knowledge, personal experiences and, of course, beer. While having a few of those hard to acquire “holy grail” beers make a tasting memorable, those beers can taste even more amazing when following a more pedestrian, average brew.

9. Take care of each other.

Even with the best intentions, people can get carried away and drink too much. Watch out for each other by encouraging those who may need to slow down or take a break. Create an atmosphere of personal and group responsibility. And make sure everyone has made arrangements for a designated driver.

10. Why so serious?

Beer is supposed to be fun. Don’t take yourself or your beer too seriously. Laugh, be humble and enjoy the company of your fellow drinkers. While sharing exciting, different beers was the impetus, what you’ll find is that the real benefit is quality time spent with good friends.

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Aug 12, 2014
Freddie Kitson

We’re going on a beer hunt



I feel a bit stink for Geoff Griggs at the moment.

Dubbed the doyen of Kiwi beer writing by those more esteemed than I, he found himself in Palmerston North at the beginning of the month.

I have told him and many others that Village Inn Kitchen is the spot to grab a beer in the city, so he is fair enough to be disappointed the place was closed when he tried to visit.

But it got me thinking: how can people travelling to cities they do not go to often find themselves a good pint?

To save you answering the question, I have put together four tips, tricks and titbits to arm you with most of the tools you will need to find good beer wherever you go.

1)   Untappd is, without a doubt, one of the handiest apps available to beer hunters. It is most commonly used to check in beers you drink – an R18 Pokedex, if you will. 

While I am no fan of its medal system – anything that gives you rewards, even if just digital, for drinking more raises moral issues with me – it has handy features.

You can see what people think of beers you are considering buying, and you can check what your friends love at beer festivals.

However, the best feature is the compass-looking icon.

You can use it to see what bars and breweries are nearby, then check that place’s page to see what people are drinking there; find the bar, check their beer list, know what they have.

This always works just as well for bottle shops, as long as people check in to the store they purchased the beer from when they enjoy it at home.

2)   Twitter has changed how people access information.

We hassle our telecommunications provider when the internet isn’t working; we find out what beers are still on tap at the pub; we organise social gatherings.

It can also be used to find out where is good for a drink.

It came in handy for me when I had to head to Dunedin for a couple of weeks last year; plenty of people came to my aid to recommend where to get a good pint.

They recommended Albar, and it is now one of my favourite pubs in the country.

3)   RealBeer was a godsend when I got into home brewing; it’s home to the best home brew forum for anyone living in New Zealand.

Not “one of the best” or “in the top few”.

The best. Period.

And what to good home brewers know about? Good beer.

Everyone on the forum has been nothing but helpful, so take advantage of them – in the nicest way possible, of course.

4)   There are these things we all interact with every day.

They can be annoying, smelly, large, and messy.

They can also be fun, small, organised and smell like a glass of IPA.

We call them “other people”.

You may talk to them sometimes about work, what to eat for dinner or how crazy the weather has been, so why not talk to them about where to get a good beer?

The way the craft beer “thing” is going these days, you are likely to know another person who appreciates good beer.

So ask around and see what they know.

Best case scenario: you’ll end up with someone to have a beer with sometime.

And, to quote Uncle Hunter, good people drink good beer.

5)   There is a plan in the works to make it easier to find, not only good beer, but all the brewries in New Zealand.

It also has a name bound to annoy every sub-editor in the world - kiwi CRAFT.

Jules van Cruysen is running a Kickstarter for kiwi CRAFT, a guidebook and app he wants to create.

kiwi CRAFT will show drinkers where to get a good beer virtually anywhere in New Zealand.

He has a big job ahead of him – he needs about $11,000 in the next nine days – but weirder things have happened (Octomom, Radlergate, any media brew made with The Beerhive).

In comparison to those three things, getting $11,000 in nine days is a walk in the park.

– Manawatu Standard

Sponsored links









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Aug 12, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Beer Me!: Dover Downs’ Brew Festival on Saturday

When Dover Downs Hotel Casino first launched its craft beer-themed Brew Festival four years ago, there were about 1,800 craft breweries in the country. These days, there are more than 2,700 and the number keeps ticking up.

That same explosive growth is happening right here in Delaware with new breweries and beer festivals popping up every year.

The expansion of Delaware’s craft beer culture has been so rapid that Lindsey Timberman, the Pike Creek publisher of the Delaware Hop Scene website, can hardly keep up.

“It’s been insane. It’s neat to see, but it’s kind of mind-boggling,” says Timberman, who started the website with her boyfriend Eric Roberts in 2012. “We used to go to Philadelphia once a month, but we have no need to now because there is so much happening right here in Delaware. There is always something going on.”

POLL: Have you ever been to a beer festival?

For the Brew Festival in Dover, which runs Saturday Aug. 16 from 4-8 p.m., a record number of 1,000 people are expected. Each year, the number of attendees has grown right along with the beer scene in the First State, says George Fiorile, vice president and general manager of hotel operations at Dover Downs Hotel Casino.

Twenty-one breweries from across the country, including Delaware’s own 3rd Wave Brewing Company (Delmar), Fordham Old Dominion Breweries (Dover), 16 Mile Brewery (Georgetown), Twin Lakes Brewing Co. (Greenville), Mispillion River Brewing (Milford) and Dogfish Head Craft Brewery (Milton), will be represented. Nearly 100 different beers will be available for tasting.

For $25, beer lovers get 10 drink tickets and a souvenir glass for guzzling at the hotel’s Rollins Center, the 18,000-square-foot ballroom that hosts everything from concerts to boxing matches. (Designated drivers get in for $15 and get unlimited soda.)

The hotel’s chefs have also whipped up some off-centered finger foods to pair with the brews. There will be items like peanut butter and jelly waffles and “mac and cheese bombs” in three flavors, including feta and spinach, bacon burger and hot dog.

The hotel will also unveil a new concoction – a stout-battered waffle dog and it’s exactly what you think it is: waffle batter infused with a stout cooked around a hot dog.

In addition to the food and drink, Bear-based island folk/rock act The Splashing Pearlswill perform, giving the festivities a cool groove backdrop.

Fiorile says the decision to host a craft beer festival was a no-brainer due to its popularity in the state. Plus, it draws a crowd largely in the 25 to 35 age group, some of whom are checking out the hotel and casino for the first time.

With the fourth annual Brew Festival now joined by more than a dozen annual beer festivals across Delaware, it’s nearly a full-time job for Timberman to keep an up-to-date calendar of Delaware craft beer events on her website.

“Very rarely is there a day in the month when there is not something going on and that speaks volumes about the craft beer scene in Delaware. When we started, we had a Facebook page and hoped to get a couple of hundred people. We’re now up to 2,200 likes,” she says. “It’s a lot to keep up with, but it’s the coolest thing to keep up with because it’s fun.

“It’s beer. Who doesn’t like to talk about beer?”

IF YOU GO

What: Fourth annual Brew Festival

When: Aug. 16, 4-8 p.m.

Where: Dover Downs Hotel Casino, 1131 U.S. 13, Dover

Cost: $25 ($15 for designated drivers)

A TASTE OF DELAWARE’S BEER FESTIVALS

Sept. 6: Brews By the Bay in Lewes (www.delawarebrewers guild.org)

Sept. 6: Historic Odessa Brewfest (www.odessabrewfest .com)

Sept. 26: Brew at the Zoo Wine Too! at Brandywine Zoo (www.brandywinezoo.org)

Sept. 27: Harvest Hop Fest at World Cafe Live sat the Queen (www.queen.worldcafelive.com)

Oct. 4: River Towns Ride Festival in New Castle and Delaware City (www.rivertownsfestival.com)

Oct. 11: Delaware Beer and Wine Festival at the Delaware Agricultural Museum Village (www.delawarewineandbeer festival.com)

Nov. 1-8: Wilmington Beer Week (www.wilmingtonbeer week.com)

April 10-11, 2015: Delaware State Fair’s Triple Threat BBQ, Beer Music Festival (www.triplethreatbbq.net)

April 2015: Wilmington Craft Beer Festival at Santa Fe Wilmington

April 2015: Dewey Beach Brewfest at Gary’s Dewey Beach Grill (www.garysdeweybeachgrill.com)

April 2015: R2Hop2 Beer and Music Festival at Fordham Dominion Brewing (www.fordhamanddominion.com)

July 2015: Downtown Newark Food Brew Festival (www.newarkfoodandbrewfest.com)

July 2015: Smyrna Craft Beer, Wine Food Festival (www.smyrnafestival.com)

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Aug 11, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Letter: Well done for a great day

Could I congratulate the organisers of the Bobtown Beer Bash which was held last Saturday.

This is the first time we have attended this event and I can say we were pleasantly amazed as to how much thought and effort had gone into it – good beer selection, quick service, good food, spotlessly clean toilets and fantastic entertainment.

I understand that the funds raised go to worthy causes and perhaps to save the village community centre from decay and degradation.

I am in no doubt that all the pubs and clubs do very well in the shadow of your hard efforts, so not only is it causes you support, you do well for all mankind that flocks to the village each year. Without your efforts, it would have been another quiet, hot Saturday in an unknown backwater.

You’ve put Bobtown on the map.

Oh and I must say, in 30 years of visiting beer festivals up and down the continent, this is the only festival that I have sampled cold beer and cider, and not warm and tepid concoctions, which is nothing short of a miracle with temperatures in the 80s.

Nice one Beer Bash organisers!

Andrew Johnson

Mirfield

Send your letters to dewsbury.editorial@jpress.co.uk or Reporter Series, Floor 5, 26 Whitehall Road, Leeds, LS12 1BE

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Aug 10, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Take Your Pick of Beer Fests

Here’s a stupid question—can Portlanders get enough beer? Of course not, as demonstrated by the sheer number of beer festivals this town holds. There’s one happening now—the Portland International Beerfest, taking place at Holladay Park by the Lloyd Center, while next weekend is the Imperial IPA Fest at Saraveza and their Bad Habit event space.

The International Beerfest, running today and tomorrow, actually has a lot of American beers, covering everything from barley wine to porters, though the real point is to get into the foreign beers. Not surprisingly Germany is well represented (lots of lagers but some interesting looking ales too) and there’s a lot of Belgium ale as well. The rest is an adventurous miscellany of Austrian, Canadian, Polish, Dutch, New Zealand, Czech, French and English beers with the odd cider. Watch out for Scottish brewery BrewDog who are known for their robust ales—their Tokio stout weighs in at a festival winning 18.2% ABV. Portland International Beerfest, Saturday Sunday, $25 (inc. 10 beer tickets). Full information is available here

Smaller in scale but with a more neighborhood feel, the Imperial IPA Fest is now in its fifth year and features 40-plus rotating taps of IPA, much of it rare or brewed especially for the fest (the likes of Block 15, Base Camp Brewing Co, Coalition, Gigantic and Solera will all be debuting exclusives). There is also a short list of regional Berliner Weisse on draft and the infamous double bacon BLT makes a return. 5th Annual IIPA Festival, August 16 17, Saraveza and Saraveza’s Bad Habit Room at 1004 N. Killingsworth, $20 (inc. glass and 10 drink tickets)

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