Browsing articles tagged with " beer festivals"
Jun 13, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Craft beer brewers have rights, too. – Glens Falls Post

Last February while covering the Saratoga Beer Summit I met Gregg Stacy, director of marketing and sales at Brown’s Brewing Co. in Troy.

Stacy is also a member of the board of directors of the New York State Brewers Association.

While talking about the group, he drew parallels to the spirit of the country’s founding fathers — a ragtag bunch of independent thinkers banding together for the good of all — to the craft beer group’s ideals in forming “a more perfect brewer’s organization.”

All over our area there are new breweries opening and current breweries expanding, which highlights the need for an organized advocacy group.

The group has been successful in bending lawmakers’ ears to change laws and issue tax incentives that make the environment for starting a brewery in New York more appealing.

Now the association has released a new “Brewers Bill of Rights and Guidelines” specifically for beer festival participation.

They were developed to help craft brewers decide whether and how to participate in the many beer festivals brewing around the state.

“With all of the attention on craft beer as of late, the interest to produce craft beer festivals by for, and not-for-profit organizations, has been overwhelming. Brewers in New York state are inundated with beer festival requests and committing to all of these events is simply impossible. To better direct the promoter and give comfort to a brewer, the NYSBA Board decided to create a set of guidelines for the festivals to follow which will assist brewers in sorting out what events would adhere to these standards thereby making their decision to participate a bit easier,” said David Katleski, owner of Empire Brewing Company and president of NYSBA in a news release.

“Over the past 15 years craft beer festivals have allowed small brewers an economical marketing option to reach out directly to potential customers by participating in these festivals. They (festivals) have been intricate in our growth. However, the volume of newer festivals has caused confusion among the consumer. These guidelines will ultimately preserve the integrity of quality beer festivals in this state,” he continued.

Paul Leone, executive director of the NYSBA said this in the release:

“With so many new breweries opening around the state, most are under increased pressure to donate their beer for all types of events, and many are unsure what to do. We felt strongly that many are being taken advantage of and these guidelines give the brewers a tool to follow so they can make the best decision possible for themselves and their brewery.”

Here’s the Bill of Rights:

1. Breweries should never pay a fee to attend a festival or event.

2. Breweries should never provide free beer to for-profit events.

3. Breweries are entitled to proof of licensing and insurance of events.

4. Breweries are entitled to reasonable compensation for time and travel.

5. Breweries have a right to proof of valid not-for-profit status and proportion of proceeds donated.

Recommended Reading

Jun 12, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Upcoming beer festivals and beer dinners

It’s summer, so that means that pretty much every day has some sort of beer events coming up.

Here are some cool looking events thatlook like they’re worth checking out.

Firs up, on Thursday, Rye Thyme in Leominster is hosting a beer dinner with White Birch Brewing of New Hampshire.

The dinner begins at 7 p.m. and costs $40.

The dinner includes grilled coconut and lime chicken skewers paired with the Belgian Pale Ale; pork belly sliders paired with Berliner Weisse; grilled peach-Habanero pork ribs paired with Hop Session Ale; and chocolate goat cheese mousse paired with Our Humble Porter.

White Birch brewer Dave Morrell will be on hand to discuss the beers.

For reservations, call 978-534-5900.

On Friday and Saturday, the third annual Hyper-Local Craft Brewpfest is taking place at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville.

The festival runs from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on Friday; 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, and 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., also on Saturday.

Tickets are $45 and available by clicking here.

Looking for a great Father’s Day gift? Stop by Night Shift Brewing, 87 Santilli custom-logo-w-text2-e1367952915562Highway, Everett, on Saturday. I’ll be setting up shop around noon and hanging out signing copies of “Boston Beer: A History of Brewing in the Hub.” Come by for some great beers and a book I hope you or the person you buy it for enjoy.

Also on Saturday, the Wachusett Brewing Company is hosting its 20th Anniversary Brewfest at the brewery, 175 State Road, Westminster.

The event, which runs from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., will feature tons of Wachusett beers, live music, food, give aways and beer.

Tickets are $25 and available by clicking here.

Recommended Reading

Jun 12, 2014
Freddie Kitson

The Best of the Rest of This Summer’s Beer Festivals

·  2nd Annual Kolsch Cup (Saturday, June 14)
Although it stretches the definition of “festival” since its contained within the walls of Gordon Biersch’s Navy Yard location, the 2nd Annual Koslch Cup will crown the region’s best Kolsch beers from among 20 local contenders. For those unfamiliar with the style, Kolsch is a light, golden-colored ale that’s slightly hopped and is a terrific hot-weather alternative to the growing number of fruit and wheat beers on the shelves this time of year. Just $20 gets attendees a tasting glass and the chance to sample all 20 entrants, which include offerings from newer, hard-to-find breweries like Lorton’s Forge Brew Works and the excellent Champion Brewing from Charlottesville.

· Chesapeake Crab and Beer Fest (June 21st and August 16
Nothing says summer in the Mid-Atlantic quite like hammering a bushel of crabs alongside a cold beer, and this year there are not one but two different chances to wash an Old Bay down with a variety of craft brews. The first of two Chesapeake Crab and Beer Fests will be held on Baltimore’s Inner Harbor on June 21st, with the second docking at DC’s National Harbor on August 16th. Both will have a similar format – all-you-can eat crabs and corn, and all-you-can-drink beer and wine.

While the beer lists for this year’s fests have yet to be finalized, last year’s lineup skewed more toward established regional microbrews (think Starr Hill, Evolution and Troegs) than some of the up-and-comers found at the other festivals in this list. Whatever it may lack in hard-to-find brews, however, it more than makes up for in crabs — more than 20,000 of them, to be exact — and waterfront views.

· Northern Virginia Summer BrewFest (June 21-22):
Next weekend marks the 7th edition of this festival, which over the last several years has (along with its Fall counterpart each September) become one of the always-circled dates on local beer lovers’ calendars. Set in a large, open field just outside of historic Leesburg, this year’s event boasts 55 breweries, 8 cider makers and even one meadery.

While several of the participating breweries fall outside the “craft” definition (Shocktop, anyone?), the region’s brewpubs, microbreweries and start-ups will be well-represented. In addition, the festival features a number of local food purveyors, vendors and bands, as well as a “family fun area” with moonbounces, facepainting and assorted distractions to entertain the kids while you polish off another IPA.

· Brew at the Zoo (July 17):
Lions and Tigers and Beers — oh my. See the National Zoo in a whole new light at this year’s Brew at the Zoo, one of the few weekday festivals in the area. Sip beer and sample food from one of the event’s 65 participating breweries and 8 food trucks —the former of will include all of the usual suspects as well as several of the region’s smaller, newer micro-and nanobreweries. Although a little pricier than many of the festivals on this list, Brew at the Zoo will most definitely be the only place to sip a pale ale under the watchful eye of an elephant, and all proceeds go toward continued animal care and conservation.

· Sierra Nevada Beer Camp, Philadelphia (Aug. 2)
Although much farther afield than many, this festival merits inclusion on sheer scope, scale and audacity alone. To celebrate the opening of its East Coast brewing facility in North Carolina, Sierra Nevada has organized an unprecedented, three-week long celebration of all things craft beer. Starting at its home base in Chico, California on July 19th, Sierra Nevada has organized beer festivals in seven different cities — craft beer hotbeds San Diego, Denver and Chicago among them — inviting virtually every single U.S. craft brewer to participate along the way. A staggering 700 (pouring over 1300 different beers in total) took them up on the invitation, 75 of whom will be represented when the beer circus comes to Philadelphia on August 2nd.

Many of the nation’s premiere Destination Breweries will be at this event, including Three Floyds of Indiana and Russian River of Northern California, both of which are among twelve that collaborated with Sierra Nevada to create a 12-pack of unique, celebratory beers that will be released in bottles in mid-July. A host of large and small brewers from Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, DC and Virginia round out the list, ensuring that the 2.5 hour drive from DC won’t be made in vain (just don’t try to make the drive back right afterwards!).

· Gettysburg BrewFest (August 23):
This one’s for those who like beer with a dash of history. A newcomer this year, the inaugural Gettysburg BrewFest combines a strong lineup of 35 small and mid-size breweries with what promises to be a unique setting on Seminary Ridge, the site of several key moments during the Battle of Gettysburg. Even more unique may the festival’s host — the Lutheran Theological Seminary — offering potentially definitive evidence of Ben Franklin’s supposed claim that “beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy.”

History and religion aside, festival highlights include appearances by many little-known southern Pennsylvania breweries such as South County, Spring House, Gunpowder Falls and the tremendously-named Something Wicked Brewing Company. If that weren’t enough, festival organizers are trumpeting (get it?) the appearance of world-renowned bugler Jari Villanueva as something sure to complete the “Gettysburg experience” for festivalgoers. He’ll play Taps while you’re drinking from them —doesn’t get much better than that.
—Scott Langerman

Recommended Reading

Jun 11, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Upcoming beer festivals and beer dinners

It’s summer, so that means that pretty much every day has some sort of beer events coming up.

Here are some cool looking events thatlook like they’re worth checking out.

Firs up, on Thursday, Rye Thyme in Leominster is hosting a beer dinner with White Birch Brewing of New Hampshire.

The dinner begins at 7 p.m. and costs $40.

The dinner includes grilled coconut and lime chicken skewers paired with the Belgian Pale Ale; pork belly sliders paired with Berliner Weisse; grilled peach-Habanero pork ribs paired with Hop Session Ale; and chocolate goat cheese mousse paired with Our Humble Porter.

White Birch brewer Dave Morrell will be on hand to discuss the beers.

For reservations, call 978-534-5900.

On Friday and Saturday, the third annual Hyper-Local Craft Brewpfest is taking place at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville.

The festival runs from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on Friday; 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, and 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., also on Saturday.

Tickets are $45 and available by clicking here.

Looking for a great Father’s Day gift? Stop by Night Shift Brewing, 87 Santilli custom-logo-w-text2-e1367952915562Highway, Everett, on Saturday. I’ll be setting up shop around noon and hanging out signing copies of “Boston Beer: A History of Brewing in the Hub.” Come by for some great beers and a book I hope you or the person you buy it for enjoy.

Also on Saturday, the Wachusett Brewing Company is hosting its 20th Anniversary Brewfest at the brewery, 175 State Road, Westminster.

The event, which runs from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., will feature tons of Wachusett beers, live music, food, give aways and beer.

Tickets are $25 and available by clicking here.

Recommended Reading

Jun 10, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Upcoming beer festivals and beer dinners

It’s summer, so that means that pretty much every day has some sort of beer events coming up.

Here are some cool looking events thatlook like they’re worth checking out.

Firs up, on Thursday, Rye Thyme in Leominster is hosting a beer dinner with White Birch Brewing of New Hampshire.

The dinner begins at 7 p.m. and costs $40.

The dinner includes grilled coconut and lime chicken skewers paired with the Belgian Pale Ale; pork belly sliders paired with Berliner Weisse; grilled peach-Habanero pork ribs paired with Hop Session Ale; and chocolate goat cheese mousse paired with Our Humble Porter.

White Birch brewer Dave Morrell will be on hand to discuss the beers.

For reservations, call 978-534-5900.

On Friday and Saturday, the third annual Hyper-Local Craft Brewpfest is taking place at the Armory, 191 Highland Ave., Somerville.

The festival runs from 6:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. on Friday; 3 p.m. to 6 p.m. on Saturday, and 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., also on Saturday.

Tickets are $45 and available by clicking here.

Looking for a great Father’s Day gift? Stop by Night Shift Brewing, 87 Santilli custom-logo-w-text2-e1367952915562Highway, Everett, on Saturday. I’ll be setting up shop around noon and hanging out signing copies of “Boston Beer: A History of Brewing in the Hub.” Come by for some great beers and a book I hope you or the person you buy it for enjoy.

Also on Saturday, the Wachusett Brewing Company is hosting its 20th Anniversary Brewfest at the brewery, 175 State Road, Westminster.

The event, which runs from 1 p.m. to 7 p.m., will feature tons of Wachusett beers, live music, food, give aways and beer.

Tickets are $25 and available by clicking here.

Recommended Reading

Jun 9, 2014
Freddie Kitson

World Beer Festival Cleveland: 5 things to know

CLEVELAND, Ohio – The World Beer Festival Cleveland returns Saturday, June 14, with some added twists and a new venue. Here are five things to know:

1. WHO PUTS THIS ON?

World Beer Festivals are produced by All About Beer Magazine, based in Durham, North Carolina. Most of the fests are in the southeastern part of the country. President Daniel Bradford says ticket sales already are ahead of last year’s event, which drew about 2,500 people.

“It’s known as ‘beer fest,’ he said. “It’s really fun. We feel the markets take it over. It’s their festival, and we got that vibe year one in Cleveland.”

2. FOCUS ON CLEVELAND

This year: The festival will be held at Jacobs Pavilion at Nautica, 2014 Sycamore St.

Last year: North Coast Harbor Dock 30 near FirstEnergy Stadium.

Why choose Cleveland?

“It had absolutely nothing to do with ‘Captain America,’ ” Bradford said, “but when we started our setup we had to wait awhile for “Captain America” (crew) to blow up all the cars in the area.

“Our model is what I call a mid-tier city,” he said. “We’ve built a really successful program to experience the adventure of beer. That’s our primary goal.”

But he said seeing knowledgeable beer drinkers in a larger city like Cleveland made returning a no-brainer.

“What was really great was the quality of the crowd,” Bradford said. “These were people who there for the quality of the beer.”

To that end, Bradford said the fest tries to “help volunteers be more knowledgeable about beer so they can talk about beer” with attendees.

An added draw for Bradford: He and the owners of Great Lakes Brewing Co., Pat and Dan Conway, are longtime friends.

“We go way back,” Bradford said. “We heard there wasn’t anything like this (going on in Cleveland), and it’s an excuse to go to Great Lakes Brewpub. I do love their beer.”

3. IF YOU GO

When: It’s 1-5 p.m. (noon-5 p.m. for VIP) Saturday, June 14.

Cost: General-admission tickets are $40 and include a tasting glass and 40 taste tickets. VIP admission tickets are $75 and offer the bonus hour, access to a private hospitality area and other amenities.

Beers: More than 200 beers will be available from around the world, country and throughout Ohio.

Info: worldbeerfestival.com (tickets also are on sale at Great Lakes Brewing Co., 2516 Market Ave., Cleveland).

4. WHAT’S HAPPENING?

• The fests emphasize “beer experiential” areas, Bradford said. That includes a scale model, 4 feet by 6 feet, of a working brewery.

• A Taste of Belgium – an area sponsored by Duvel Moortgat USA – is expected to include Duvel, Liefmans, Brewery Ommegang, Brasserie D’Achouffe and Maredsous. In addition to tasting styles ranging from golden ales to lambics, tripels and other ales, patrons will be able to sample Belgian waffles paired with beer.

• Great Lakes Brewing Co. will explore details behind the art of creating a beer and information about sustainable farming.

• Beer seminars include a roundtable discussion with reps from Fat Head’s Brewery, Thirsty Dog Brewery and Buckeye Brewing.

• Some of the festival’s proceeds will go to Engage! Cleveland. The group aims to attract and retain young professionals in Greater Cleveland. “When we go into a market we’re looking for a charity that resonates with our lifestyle and is a bridge to the sort of people who like our event,” Bradford said. Organizers said World Beer Festivals have raised more than $350,000 for charities over the years.

5. ATTENDING OHIO BREWERIES

New this year: Akron’s Thirsty Dog and Columbus’ Four String Brewing Co.

Returning Northeast Ohio breweries: Black Box, Brew Kettle, Buckeye, Cornerstone, Fat Head’s, Great Lakes, Griffin Cider Works, Hoppinʼ Frog, Lagerheads, Portside.

Returning out-of-area breweries: Elevator (Columbus), Great Black Swamp (Toledo), Jackie Oʼs (Athens), Rivertown (Cincinnati), Rockmill (Lancaster).

Recommended Reading

Jun 6, 2014
Freddie Kitson

The American beer industry from its earliest days

Lauren Clark caught the first wave of American craft beer. The author of “Crafty Bastards,” Clark (pictured) quit her desk job about 20 years ago to become an apprentice at the former Commonwealth Brewing Co. After a stint as an assistant brewer at Cambridge Brewing Co., she gravitated toward a writing and editing career. She is founder of drinkboston.com, a site about drinks and bars in the Hub.

“Crafty Bastards: Beer in New England, From the Mayflower to Modern Day” is an overview of the industry from its earliest days in America, beginning with what the Pilgrims brewed, and including how Jamaica Plain became a brewing hub, when Jim Koch began dominating craft beer, and why the website Beer Advocate, founded by two Massachusetts residents, now attracts 2.5 million monthly visitors.

Continue reading below

Early New Englanders were a resourceful bunch, says Clark, a resident of Somerville, and they brewed with whatever raw ingredients they could find. “That was what it was all about for the first couple hundred years. It was, ‘Hey, we have a lot of molasses. Let’s make a beer out of that.’ ”

Throughout the book, Clark comes back to the resilience and “Yankee ingenuity” shown by brewers, even today. Trillium Brewing is shoehorned into a tiny space in Boston’s Fort Point neighborhood, where an old dairy tank is the mash tun (the vessel in which starches are converted into sugar to be fermented). Acquiring the proper license to pour samples took more than a year.

“New England brewers are accustomed to have to do these hacks,” says Clark. “And now they have to deal with these regulations and codes, a lot of red tape. But they still do it. They don’t give up.”

Women were some of the earliest brewers. “Brewing beer was like making dinner,” says Clark. “They had to make beer for their families.”

Today, women are often on the outside of an industry that, while gaining notice, can still be insular. Clark says she never felt excluded during her stint as a professional brewer, but she sees how the current beer culture — where most brewers and many drinkers are men — can leave women out. “It’s still very much male-dominated for sure,” she says. “There still is a real nerdiness and aggressiveness about beer appreciation, ‘My beer has more hops than your beer.’ On the consumer side, there is sort of this arm-wrestling people do with their taste for beer.

“There’s this notion that women like sweet, pink drinks. That’s total B.S. Who are the wine drinkers? At least half the wine drinkers are women, and a lot of good wines are not sweet at all.”

The most obvious example of beer’s gender divide is beer festivals, she says. “There are situations where the maleness of craft beer culture comes out. At beer festivals. Women look around and are like, ‘OK, this is a scene.’ ”

Lauren Clark will appear on June 10 at Stoddard’s Fine Food Ale, 48 Temple Place, Boston, in an event celebrating women in beer, sponsored by Boston Area Beer Enthusiasts Society and Girls’ Pint Out.

Recommended Reading

Jun 6, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Toronto Summer: Three cheers to 2014′s beer festivals

It’s a Canadian summer tradition – sharing a cold beer outside with a couple of good friends.

But instead of reaching for your usual brew, treat your taste buds to something local at some of the many craft beer festivals going on around the city this summer.

And what better way to kick off the summer than with Ontario Craft Beer Week.

The week-long festival, which starts June 13, celebrates the thriving locally-based craft beer industry and gives a taste of the kind of premium quality offered in Ontario craft beer.

The festival starts with Session Toronto, a two-day celebration of food, music and craft beer, which will take over Yonge-Dundas square.

“This craft beer industry is on the rise, obviously, but there’s a lot of people that still don’t know what’s going on,” Jed Corbeil, co-founder of Session Toronto, told CityNews. “They don’t know this wonderful thing that’s right on their doorstep. It’s local people making local beers and they’re right there in front of you.”

He says he feels the rise in popularity not only has to do with the quality of product being produced across the province but that it also feels good supporting local businesses.

“People love quality; quality’s timeless,” Corbiel explained. “When people understand that it’s brewed in small batches and it’s something that’s made locally…You want to support them because they’re real people.”

The event also includes Collaboration Nation where 30 craft brewers are teamed up with local artists and celebrities and compete for a listing in the LCBO.

“The people who won in 2013 were Beau’s All Natural Brewing company and Tom Green,” said Corbeil. “They sold, in the first four months, 60,000 bottles of this winning beer. It’s huge!”

SESSION TORONTO PROMO from DMJHodge on Vimeo.

But if you’re thinking beer festivals aren’t for everyone… think again.

Taking place on Canada Day, Brewers Backyard, at the Evergreen Brick Works, is an event for all ages.

“We like to refer to it as a farmers market for craft beer,” explained founder Cass Enright. “It’s held during the day, it’s very casual and relaxed vibe. We like having everyone come out to it – from the kids to parents to grandma and grandpa.”

Brewers Backyard showcases different craft brewers and food vendors from around the province. The proceeds for the event go to Evergreen, a community environmental centre.

“It’s great to see new business open up and create new products for consumers and beers that Torontonians can be proud of coming from the city,” said Enright. “Great homegrown products that are getting attention all across the province.”

Another staple of the summer is the Toronto Festival of Beers which returns to Bandshell Park at Exhibition Place July 25 – 27. Try some of the over 300 brands at the festival, including Steam Whistle, Flying Monkey, Banks, Mad Noisy, Triple Bogey and Junction Craft Brewing. The world beer pavilion which will feature beer from a host town, region or country each year.

And what’s a festival without great music? K-OS, The Trews and Matthew Good will each headline a night on the main stage.

The three-day event not only showcases some of the best independent breweries in Ontario but offers guided tours and VIP packages for an extra charge.

Also make sure to check out the Roundhouse Craft Beer Festival Aug. 9 and 10. The outdoor festival, which is in its third year, encourages a relaxing environment – a picnic blanket, good beer, good food and good conversation.

Recommended Reading

Jun 6, 2014
Freddie Kitson

Beer festivals aren’t just fun places to drink — they also help launch new … – Omaha World

Posted: Thursday, June 5, 2014 1:00 am

Beer festivals aren’t just fun places to drink 
— they also help launch new brewers

By Andrea Kszystyniak / World-Herald staff writer

The Omaha World-Herald

Summer in Omaha is the season of beer.

There are at least five beer festivals hitting the area in the next few months, starting with Omaha Beer Fest and Benson Beer Fest this weekend.

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      Jun 5, 2014
      Freddie Kitson

      Wine and beer festivals shine throughout the area this summer

      Paul Tonacci

      Paul Tonacci



      Posted: Wednesday, June 4, 2014 2:19 pm

      Wine and beer festivals shine throughout the area this summer

      By PAUL TONACCI, At The Shore

      The Press of Atlantic City


      Who says tasting wine has to be a stuffy experience? Not me. And perhaps not you if you’re planning to attend a wine festival this summer.

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