Browsing articles tagged with " Cart Vendors"
Sep 17, 2013
Jim Benson

Reducing Emissions, One NYC Street-Vendor Cart At…

By




New York food cart hooks up to the grid. [Photo by Simply Grid]

New York food cart hooks up to the grid. [Photo by Simply Grid]

Enlarge Photo

Almost anything can be run on electricity these days. Add to the list, now, even New York City’s numerous food carts.

In a new pilot program, street vendors are testing out “grid-powered” electrical connections as an alternative to the noisy, polluting generators they typically use to run their carts, Gothamist reports.

The hardware is being supplied by Simply Grid, a company specializing in “on demand” services involving public access to electricity.

It launched similar electric food-cart pilot programs in Atlanta and Austin earlier this year. New York’s program is sponsored by the Mayor’s Office, the city DoT, and local utility Con Edison.

To keep New Yorkers supplied with hot dogs and falafel, Simply Grid installs a pedestal on the street that vendors plug into using the cords that normally attach to their generator.

The pedestals have built-in metering controllers that connect wirelessly to Simply Grid and to the vendor’s smartphone, allowing each vendor to turn on the service with a tap.

“We accept SMS text messages for outlet control too,” notes the company’s Michael Dubrovsky, “so vendors without smartphones can still use the service.”

Simply Grid estimates that switching from generators to grid electricity could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 9 metric tons a year.

It also says its system will save vendors money by eliminating the need to buy fuel for the generators.

One thing is certain: New York streets would be (a little) quieter without constantly running food-cart generators.

With food-cart vendors hooking up to the grid and New York cabbies testing out electric taxis, who knows what will go electric next?

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Sep 14, 2013
Jim Benson

Reducing Emissions, One NYC Street-Vendor Cart At A Time

By




New York food cart hooks up to the grid. [Photo by Simply Grid]

New York food cart hooks up to the grid. [Photo by Simply Grid]

Enlarge Photo

Almost anything can be run on electricity these days. Add to the list, now, even New York City’s numerous food carts.

In a new pilot program, street vendors are testing out “grid-powered” electrical connections as an alternative to the noisy, polluting generators they typically use to run their carts, Gothamist reports.

The hardware is being supplied by Simply Grid, a company specializing in “on demand” services involving public access to electricity.

It launched similar electric food-cart pilot programs in Atlanta and Austin earlier this year. New York’s program is sponsored by the Mayor’s Office, the city DoT, and local utility Con Edison.

To keep New Yorkers supplied with hot dogs and falafel, Simply Grid installs a pedestal on the street that vendors plug into using the cords that normally attach to their generator.

The pedestals have built-in metering controllers that connect wirelessly to Simply Grid and to the vendor’s smartphone, allowing each vendor to turn on the service with a tap.

“We accept SMS text messages for outlet control too,” notes the company’s Michael Dubrovsky, “so vendors without smartphones can still use the service.”

Simply Grid estimates that switching from generators to grid electricity could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 9 metric tons a year.

It also says its system will save vendors money by eliminating the need to buy fuel for the generators.

One thing is certain: New York streets would be (a little) quieter without constantly running food-cart generators.

With food-cart vendors hooking up to the grid and New York cabbies testing out electric taxis, who knows what will go electric next?

_______________________________________________

Follow GreenCarReports on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.



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Aug 2, 2013
Jim Benson

Naperville to conduct survey about downtown food carts

Mobile food cart vendors have been selling hot dogs and pulled pork in downtown Naperville since at least 2010, but now city officials want to ask the public if they should remain part of the scene.

The vendors say they fill a need for a quick bite along the Riverwalk or by the Chicago Avenue parking garage, but critics claim the carts may steal business from established restaurants.

“It’s been a delicate balance,” Katie Wood, executive director of Downtown Naperville Alliance, said about the mobile food cart program the city began three years ago. “We just want to make sure it’s the best thing for the community and it doesn’t get too carried away so brick-and-mortar restaurants aren’t in jeopardy.”

The $275 annual permits now held by two vendors — Joe Hornbaker of Joey’s Red Hots and John Singleton of John’s Rib House — recently were extended until Dec. 31.

When the city council agreed to the extension, staff members committed to review the program. The public survey is part of that review, city spokeswoman Linda LaCloche said.

Developed by the Downtown Advisory Commission, the survey will ask people if they like the food carts, if the presence of the carts motivated them to come downtown, and if they’ve ever changed their plans from eating at a restaurant because of the carts’ on-the-go options, Wood said.

Hornbaker, who sells hot dogs and brats from his cart on Main Street just south of Jackson near the Riverwalk’s horse trough fountain, said he hopes the program is allowed to continue.

“I don’t think I really hurt anybody,” Hornbaker said. “A lot of my customers have dogs and are walking with kids and strollers. It’s just easier to stop by here.”

He also hopes for more flexibility in the hours vendors are permitted to operate, which now are set for lunch from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and late-night nosh from 10 p.m. to 2 a.m. Looser time restrictions would help make up for time lost when he decides not to set up shop because of rain or excessive heat, Hornbaker said.

Reliability, however, is one of the issues Chris Finck said he has noticed since the mobile food vendors began operating. Finck, chairman of the Downtown Naperville Alliance board, said the vendors have not added to the vibrancy or festive atmosphere of the downtown, but they have created additional concerns about garbage and unfair competition.

“The biggest issue I’m most concerned about is they siphon off some business from the mom-and-pop restaurants,” Finck said. “I don’t think it’s fair that they get optimal locations for the price of a permit when the other brick-and-mortar restaurants have to pay rent.”

LaCloche said the survey will help gauge opinions from food cart customers and potential customers before the end of the year when the licenses expire.

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Jul 25, 2013
Jim Benson

Meet the three Brooklyn food vendors the city says are the dirtiest

Meet the dirtiest grub purveyors in Brooklyn.

City health inspectors have fined 357 food-cart vendors in Brooklyn for using grimy bare hands, smoking by the cart and even selling mystery meats — and the worst offender is the hot dog guy in front of Woodhull Medical Center.

In 2012, street-food purveyor Matthew Ninos, 32, racked up 13 violations and was hit with $6,000 in fines at his stand at 760 Flushing Ave., tying him with two other vendors for the worst currently at work in the borough.

His offenses included serving “food from an unapproved or unknown source,” failing to keep his cart clean and even storing drinks in a freezer on the floor, records obtained by the Daily News show.

“They give us tickets for stupid, little things all the time,” he said, noting he was inspected 10 times in 2012, which is more than the citywide average.

A health inspector (left) writes up Bushwick food-cart vendor Matthew Ninos.

A health inspector (left) writes up Bushwick food-cart vendor Matthew Ninos.

“One ticket can cost $1,000 and it usually takes one week at least to make up that money. The city is just finding different ways to suck out money from people like me,” he added.

City officials insist the rules are in place to protect bargain-conscious customers who rely on cheap eats — but critics of the system note that the city does not track illnesses tied to dirty street food and there have been no recent food-related health outbreaks.

RELATED: NYC STREET VENDORS OFFER HOT DOGS, $7M IN HEALTH VIOLATIONS

“I eat here at least once a week and I’ve never gotten sick so far,” said Maritza Vasquez, 38, who has eaten at Ninos’ cart for 14 years. “I don’t see anything wrong with the way he makes the food.”

In 2012, inspectors wrote 1,285 violations against Brooklyn’s 357 carts for violations such as bugs in the grub, working with grimy hands or storing food at improper temperatures, records show.

Brooklyn hot dog vendor Shawki Eldin was hit with 13 violations in 2012, including dirty equipment and the absence of a required sink for hand-washing.

Tanay Warerkar

Brooklyn hot dog vendor Shawki Eldin was hit with 13 violations in 2012, including dirty equipment and the absence of a required sink for hand-washing.

A halal cart vendor in Bay Ridge also got hit with 13 violations since the start of 2012. Over nine inspections last year, Imam Hassanain was fined with failing to cook the meat long enough, failing to keep cold food refrigerated and for not having a proper hand-washing station.

Another of the dirtiest carts is run by Shawki Eldin, 52, who sells hot dogs in front of the Brooklyn Public Library at Grand Army Plaza.

He owes $7,480 in fines since 2012 for 13 violations that include use of dirty equipment, failure to keep his hands clean and leaving raw food out in the open.

“It’s so difficult already. I barely make $100 a day and they just charge me for anything they want,” Eldin said.

Unlike restaurants, the Bloomberg administration doesn’t grade the carts or let the public know how dirty they are by posting the violation information online.

The worst food-cart vendor operated a cart at Broadway and Halsey St., which was hit with 17 violations. But the operator of that truck, Ali Shaheen, has since left the business.

rblau@nydailynews.com

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Jul 23, 2013
Tim Lester

Hot dogs, pretzels, $7M in health violations offered by NYC street vendors

This number is truly sickening — scofflaw street food vendors, who ignore New York City fines and cleanliness all the same, owe the city more than $7 million.

Since 2010, Health Department violations issued to food cart vendors for assorted disgusting infractions have resulted in $10.8 million in assessed fines — but only about $3.5 million of that total has actually been collected, according to city records obtained by the Daily News.

Even more de-appetizing, many of the vile vendors who haven’t paid up are still hawking questionable eats on city streets.

“That’s obviously a problem,” Deputy City Health Commissioner Daniel Kass said.

So much so that the recently approved city budget for the 2013-14 fiscal year allocates $580,000 for a seven-lawyer squad that will be tasked with tracking down scofflaw vendors.

The scofflaws include Shawki Eldin, a Brooklyn hot dog seller who owes $7,480 in outstanding fines for violations that include use of dirty equipment, failure to keep his hands clean and leaving raw food out in the open.

Eldin moved his hot dog cart from downtown Brooklyn, N.Y., to Prospect Park and has not paid $19,030 in fines levied by the Health Department, according to city records.

Tanay Warerkar

Eldin moved his hot dog cart from downtown Brooklyn, N.Y., to Prospect Park and has not paid $19,030 in fines levied by the Health Department, according to city records.

“The officers never treat me well,” said the 52-year-old Egyptian immigrant, who has racked up 12 violations since the start of 2012. “They are just targeting me because they know I’m an immigrant and can’t afford to fight them.”

Eldin was repeatedly inspected and fined while hawking weiners in downtown Brooklyn, but he has recently moved his cart to the front of he Brooklyn Public Library at Grand Army Plaza in an effort to escape city inspectors.

“I barely make $100 a day and they just charge me for anything they want,” he added. “I have to send money to my family in Egypt as well, so it’s hard.”

Many of the worst scofflaw vendors switch their business names, illegally lease out their carts, or use other schemes to avoid paying their bills.

Last year, the city Health Department issued 7,124 fines to sidewalk food vendors for violations that run the gamut of gross — bugs in the grub, working with grimy hands or storing food at improper temperatures, records show. There are also fines for violations that won’t make consumers ill, such as posting permits in the wrong place or having too large a cart. The fines can run up to $500.

The violation issued most often — 1,093 times — was for food stored in an adjacent cooler or in a container stashed on the sidewalk.

Eldin holds a pretzel. Hopefully, it's one he's eating himself instead of serving without gloves, since the Health Department says he's been fined for failing to keep his hands clean and other violations.

Tanay Warerkar

Eldin holds a pretzel. Hopefully, it’s one he’s eating himself instead of serving without gloves, since the Health Department says he’s been fined for failing to keep his hands clean and other violations.

“I don’t think coolers are a threat to anyone,” said Sean Basinski, director of the Street Vendor Project, an advocacy group. “I’ve never tripped on one.”

The second most-common violation, issued 659 times, was for carts being run without permits. Third on the list, with 557 citations, was for vendors operating without a license.

The city often confiscates unlicensed carts but, as the records reveal, fines for skirting the law are rarely paid.

“When there are people operating without a license or a permit, we don’t always know who they are,” Kass admitted.

But Basinski argued that vendors aren’t paying the fines because they simply can’t afford them — as Eldin’s example illustrates.

“The city could collect more money by lowering the fines,” he argued.

In addition to paying lawyers to take up the hunt for scofflaws, the city is moving to hold permit-holders more accountable. Starting this fall, fines issued to vendors who are hired to run a cart that is owned by a permit-holder will ultimately be charged to the permit-holder, officials say.

“The hope is it will lead to better supervision and that it will increase compliance,” Kass said, noting that permits will not be renewed if there are outstanding fines.

rblau@nydailynews.com

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Jul 20, 2013
Kim Rivers

Balt. Co. Planning Board passes new food truck laws

A set of regulations that would establish specific laws for food trucks in Baltimore County was unanimously passed by the county Planning Board Thursday, which now sends the legislation onto the County Council for codification.

“We’ll see how it goes with the council,” Willy Dely, president of the Maryland Mobile Food Vendors Association, said. “Overall, that’s what we expected. We think it’s a good compromise for food trucks, brick-and-mortar restaurants and for our customers.”

In addition to outlining in county code the definition of a food truck, the proposed legislation focuses on designating where food trucks are allowed to park and how long they can park in street-side spaces.

According to a presentation given to the Planning Board at a public hearing June 20, food trucks are defined as, “A self-contained mobile vehicle that sells food from the curb side of its vehicle to customers on the curb side of a public street.”

That designation removes them from a previous classification which includes door-to-door salesmen and hot dog cart vendors.

The legislation was crafted as a result of several meetings with Department of Planning staff, restaurateurs and food truck owners.

Food truck vendors and the Maryland Restaurant Association asked the county in 2011 to clarify the laws, because, as the two parties said, current regulations are prohibitive to food truck vendors and frustrating to restaurant owners.

Restaurant owners, especially those in Towson, said the current law’s guideline for a 100-foot buffer zone from brick-and-mortar restaurants was too close.

Food truck operators said they couldn’t set up, serve food and break down in the time allotted on county parking meters. Currently, the food trucks are subject to the same meter limits as any other vehicle parked on Towson streets.

During the June 20 hearing, some restaurant owners lobbied that the newly proposed 300-foot buffer zone from established restaurants should be extended to 500 feet. The Planning Board agreed to 300 feet.

In downtown Towson, under the new regulations, that stipulation would prohibit food trucks from setting up on York Road, and Chesapeake, Allegheny and Pennsylvania avenues east of Washington Avenue. Parking west of Washington Avenue near the courthouses is permitted, but the brick-and-mortar restaurants east of Washington Avenue prohibit food trucks from parking on those streets.

The issue of parking time limits was also addressed by the legislation. Like all other vehicles parked for longer than the one-hour limit, food trucks will be assessed a $50 fine. A second $50 fine will be levied if the food truck stays in one spot for longer than four hours. That provision placates restaurant owners who were concerned the food trucks could set up for an entire day.

Two amendments were also made to the proposed legislation. The Planning Board stipulated that a food truck that is issued more than five violations of the parking regulations in one year could have its county license revoked.

In the second amendment, a clause that allowed restaurant owners to bypass the buffer zone and give food truck vendors permission to park in front of their restaurant was removed.

The proposed legislation must now be presented to and approved by the Baltimore County Council, though no timeline for a vote has been set.

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Jul 15, 2013
Jim Benson

Selectmen to discuss regs for food cart vendors – Eagle

July 14, 2013

Selectmen to discuss regs for food cart vendors


By Paul Tennant



ptennant@eagletribune.com
The Eagle Tribune


Sun Jul 14, 2013, 10:41 PM EDT

NORTH ANDOVER — A food vendor cannot just drive a truck to North Andover and start selling hot dogs, ice cream, frozen yogurt or fried dough.

The vendor needs to obtain a permit from the town Health Department. The selectmen are scheduled to review proposed new regulations for mobile food vendors at tomorrow night’s meeting of the board.

The selectmen will meet at 7 p.m. on the second floor of Town Hall. Town Manager Andrew Maylor is expected to present a draft study on the Route 125 corridor.

The selectmen have often said they want to encourage economic development along Route 125, which now has large areas of unused land.

Running will have a prominent place on the agenda – running in road races, that is, not running for office. Representatives of the Borderline Running Club will be at the meeting to present a donation to the Friends of the North Andover Senior Center.

The proceeds of the 4th of July Road Race, which the club resurrected, were dedicated to the Senior Center. Eli Bailin of Green Stride has requested permission to hold the Earth, Rock, Run on the streets of North Andover on April 24 of next year. This event is slated to start and finish at 1600 Osgood St.

E. Alexandra Coakley of the North Andover Athletic Association is seeking permission to hold the 3rd Annual Knights on the Run road race Oct. 19. This race will start and finish at the home of the Scarlet Knights, North Andover High School.

While most of the younger generation is in the middle of summer vacation, the members of the North Andover High School Chorus apparently want a break from their time off. Chorus director Sara Durkin has asked to reserve the Common for a concert Aug. 1, 5 to 9 p.m.







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Jun 25, 2013
Tim Lester

Must Taste: The Five Dishes to Try at This Year’s LA Street Food Fest

Several weeks ago, we were graciously invited to a pre-tasting of the third annual L.A. Street Food Fest. The popular festival has evolved a bit this year. In addition to food trucks, the organizers have invited street cart vendors, pop-up concepts, and restaurant chefs to join in on the fun. Live music, cocktails, beer, wine, and a wide selection of dessert vendors are also expected at the event, set to take place this Saturday, June 29 at Pasadena’s Rose Bowl. See the full list of (100+) vendors here.

So, how to navigate such a vast array of food and drink? Allow us to recommend five bites that are worth a taste.

 ❶ The Grilled Cheese Truck: It doesn’t really matter what The Grilled Cheese Truck is serving this year, because it will be fried to a crisp and oozing with at least two kinds of cheese. This is one to wait in line for.

 ❷ Ceviche Project: For years, Octavio Olivas and his wife Shannon have hosted guests at various locations in celebration of ceviche. The Mexico-city native works as an attorney, but has propelled his love of raw fish marinated in acid into a regular pop-up. At the street food fest, Olivas will be offering white fish ceviche on addictive plantain crisps.

 ❸ Luckdish Curry: Tomo Seo’s newish food truck slings comfort food in the way of Japanese-style curry. The entreprenueur drove all the way to Michigan to find the 1969 Airstream that he turned into Luckdish. Now mostly stationed downtown and in Santa Monica, Luckdish will be serving a chicken curry at the fest. The clean, bright flavor of this curry goes well with a crisp beer.

 ❹ Dante’s Fried Chicken: You can now get Dante’s Fried Chicken every Tuesday at Short Order at the Farmers Market. But if you’re heading to the fest, do check out Dante’s crispy chicken biscuit bites. He’ll be serving them with a sauce called apricot crack. Enough said.

 ❺ Donut Snob: New to the fest this year is Donut Snob, a gourmet donut caterer. Behind the fantastical creations at the Snob is baker Janeen Gudelj, who will be handing out creations like The Oinkster (raised maple cinnamon with maple bacon bits) and Salted Caramel (with a caramel and sea salt glaze).


http://streetfoodlocator.com/blog/wp-content/plugins/RSSPoster_PRO/cache/d0090_arrow.pngL.A. Street Food Fest, The Rose Bowl, 1001 Rose Bowl Dr., Pasadena

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Jun 24, 2013
Jim Benson

Food carts steadily find a niche with Klamath Falls diners

Tasty trends

Tasty trends

Kay VonTersch makes parmesan garlic fries in her food cart at 729 South Sixth St. (HN photo by Kate Tracy)

Tasty trends

Tasty trends

Kay VonTersch, along with her husband Chris, owns K’z Purple Onion on 729 South Sixth St. (HN photo by Kate Tracy).

Tasty trends

Tasty trends

Lee Gifford is the owner of Primo Express, an Italian food cart at 3344 Washburn Way (HN photo by Kate Tracy).




Posted: Sunday, June 23, 2013 12:00 am


Food carts steadily find a niche with Klamath Falls diners

By KATE TRACY
HN Staff Reporter

Herald and News

|
0 comments

It may not equal any of the culinary glories of Portland’s food cart Mecca, but for certain vendors in Klamath Falls, business is heating up.


Last summer, food cart entrepreneurs found city regulations and rules hard to combat, as downtown locations failed to work out for them. The city had stipulations for bathroom use, asphalt requirements, health issues and other rules that made some food cart vendors decide against the idea.

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Sunday, June 23, 2013 12:00 am.

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New Reality Show to Center Around Portland Food Carts

PORTLAND, OR - Reality shows on radio have turn a large partial of what people are examination on radio these days. From a countless residence mother programs to Duck Dynasty to a countless competitions centered around cooking, transport and survival,  Americans are spending most of their radio observation time looking in on a lives of several aspects of a enlightenment we might not be informed with.

A Portland formed film organisation is removing prepared to start filming a lives of another enlightenment to share with Americans. Portland food transport owners in a realty uncover patrician Cart and Soul.

Cart and Soul Reality Show

Not a standard existence uncover formed on a play or oddness of a cast, Cinesational Video Productions, is doing what they feel is a approach to change a landscape of TV. Through certain realty uncover concepts.

The Plot of Cart and Soul:

What if we took 8 Portland area food transport vendors, placed them in a existence series, watched them correlate with their families, friends, and customers, and afterwards asked them any week to give something behind to a community..

Maybe it’s their time, effort, money, heart, or ideas….

Could hearts be changed?
Could lives be changed?
Could families be changed?
Could communities be changed?
Could YOU be changed?

The Cast:

French Twist Food Cart - Scott Dean
The Hope Kitchen Food Cart Catering - Marsha Baker, @Michell Baker and @Darrin Ezell
Bro-Dogs Food Cart - @Scott Smith and @Andrew Wade
The Italian Market - @Andrew Vidulich and @Erin Callahan
Mix ‘N’ Match Creamery – Food Cart - @Eric West and @Genevieve West
The Gaufre Gourmet - @Mike Susak and @Charlene Wesler
The Blue Coyote Catering Company - @John Dyrnes

If we would like to keep adult on a prolongation of this plan check them out at:

TWITTERwww.twitter.com/cartandsoul
FACEBOOKwww.facebook.com/cartandsoul
WEBSITEwww.cartandsoulshow.com
EMAIL – fans@cartandsoulshow.com

Related posts:

  1. Portland Vacancies Drop Where Food Carts Flourish
  2. Portland: Land of Food Carts; Food Trucks Not So Much
  3. Cartopia: Portland Food Cart Revolution
  4. Six Arrested in Portland Food Cart Attack

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