Browsing articles tagged with " food carts"
Sep 4, 2013
Kim Rivers

Black Hills buffalo retailer to appear on ‘Great Food Truck Race’

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RAPID CITY — A Black Hills-based buffalo meat retailer will appear on a Food Network show on Sunday.

Wild Idea Buffalo, which sells grass-fed meat, will compete in “The Great Food Truck Race” show when the show rolls into the ranch outside of Rapid City.

Food truck teams will compete to see which can create buffalo meals and then sell the most items in town from their trucks. Results from the competition, along with other stops during the show, will determine the wining food truck.

The prize is $50,000.

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Sep 4, 2013
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Stops: September 3

Happy Tuesday, food truck followers! Ease yourself into a short work week with dishes such as fish tacos at Surfside, a pretzel burger at BurGorilla, and a pulled-pork sandwich at Porc Mobile.


Chinatown (Seventh and G sts., NW), where you’ll find Captain Cookie, and Cheesequake.

Farragut Square (17th and I sts., NW), where you’ll find DC Ballers, DC Greek Food, Far East Taco Grill, Tokyo in the City, Kimchi BBQ Taco, Surfside, and Fasika.

Franklin Square (13th and K sts., NW), where you’ll find Captain Cookie, Cathy’s Bistro, Far East Taco Grill, Rito Loco, Rolling Ficelle, Yumpling, Fresh Green Food, and Porc Mobile.

L’Enfant (Sixth St. and Maryland Ave., SW), where you’ll find Cajunators, DC Ballers, Sweetbites Truck, Tokyo in the City, Mayur Kabob House, What the Pho?, and BurGorilla.

Metro Center (12th and G sts., NW), where you’ll find Dangerously Delicious Pies, Stella’s PopKern, Caribbean Cafe, Jerk Chicken Festival, Peruvian Brothers, Pho Junkies, and Yellow Vendor.

Navy Yard (First and M sts., SE), where you’ll find Brown Bag, and 70′s Frankfurter.

Northern Virginia, where you’ll find Amorini Panini, Big Cheese, Willie’s Po Boy (Rosslyn), District Taco (Crystal City), Latin American Flavors (Ballston), and Top Dog (Reston).

State Department (around 21st St. and Virginia Ave., NW), where you’ll find Basil Thyme, and DC Ballers.

Union Station (North Capitol St. and Massachusetts Ave., NE), where you’ll find Crepes Parfait, Best Burritos, Dorothy Moon Burgers, Fire Rice, and Cap Mac.

West End (24th and M sts., NW), where you’ll find Amorini Panini, and Far East Taco Grill.

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Sep 4, 2013
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Fridays returns

THURSDAY 9/5

Clinton School of Public Service hosts a panel discussion about the Arkansas Repertory Theatre’s season opener “Pal Joey” with Producing Artistic Director Robert Hupp and members of the cast, noon, free. Author and University of Arkansas professor Hoyt Purvis will speak and sign copies of his new book, “Voices of the Razorbacks,” at CALS Main Library, 5:30 p.m. The END MASS Incarceration Movement Arkansas Chapter and the Social Justice Initiative at Philander Smith College will screen “The House I Live In,” followed by a panel discussion, Philander Smith, 6-9 p.m. Cindy Woolf plays an album release show at Stickyz, with Amy Garland, 9 p.m., $5.

FRIDAY 9/6

Little Rock food eaters take note: Food Truck Fridays returns to downtown at the corner of Capitol and Main. This week, the lineup is Clyde-n-Kiddos, Kona Ice, Philly’s Steak and Cheese and kBird, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. The Weekend Theater begins its production of “100 Saints You Should Know,” about a priest who must reconcile his desires with his role in the church, a teenage boy confused about his sexuality and a young woman desperate for spiritual validation, 7:30 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays through Sept. 21, $12-$16. Mississippi bluesman Lightnin’ Malcolm brings his swirling, hypnotic guitar playing to White Water Tavern, 10 p.m., $7. Fayetteville party instigators Boom Kinetic bring the ruckus to Revolution, 9:30 p.m., $10. Fayetteville-based Southern rockers Backroad Anthem play at Stickyz, 9:30 p.m., $8.

SATURDAY 9/7

“The Affordable Care Act Made Simple” is an information session about obtaining health insurance through the ACA, Faulkner County Library, 2 p.m., free. The Urban Raw Festival includes food, music, theater and a variety of arts-related workshops and presentations, Wildwood Park for the Performing Arts, 9 a.m.-10 p.m., $5 adv., $7 day of. Rodney Block and the Real Music Lovers bring their mix of hip-hop, RB and neo-soul to the cozy environs of the White Water Tavern, 9 p.m., $10. Faith-driven emo-rockers Red Jumpsuit Apparatus play at Juanita’s, 9 p.m., $10 adv., $12 day of. Turnpike Troubadours offer up an evening of Americana and Red Dirt rocking at Revolution, 9 p.m., $12 adv., $15 day of.

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Sep 4, 2013
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Coming to Macon in October

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Food trucks are popping across the nation, and Macon is the latest city to jump on the bandwagon.

The Moonhanger Group will roll out its breakfast and lunch treats the first week in October.

The group also announced this week that it took over management of downtown Macon’s Cox Capitol Theatre last week.

Moonhanger Group currently oversees, the Rookery, Dovetail and the Armory Ballroom.

Roger Riddle, the group’s marketing manager,  says their customer fan  base was largely responsible for the food truck.

“Individuals on our social media site were really responsible for  this addition,” said Riddle.

“They were telling us this is what they  wanted and we wanted give Central Georgia a little taste of the Rookery, particularly those who  were unable to come downtown,” Riddle said.

Riddle says the Cox Capitol Theatre will serve as the home base for the truck, but it will rotate throughout Central Georgia during breakfast and lunch hours.

The Rookery and Cox Capitol Theatre Facebook Pages will update the times and location of the truck.

The theater was previously run by the Hummingbird Group. Riddle said the Hummingbird wanted to move on to “bigger and better things.”

Under new management, Riddle says he hopes to bring more live entertainment acts to the Cox.

 

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Sep 4, 2013
Kim Rivers

Texas ‘Top Chef’ goes from truck to brick and mortar

Thomas Bailey

Restauraeur Paul Qui has opened Qui, which highlights his Japanese cooking training and his Filipino roots.

AUSTIN, Texas — Nestled between taquerias and rundown hipster bars is a stark white cube with a line of young professionals curling around it. The restaurant Qui doesn’t accept reservations so out-of-towners and Austinites brave 100-degree weather and wait times of up to two hours.

Onto the parched landscape of central Texas, restaurateur Paul Qui has introduced the vernacular of Asian street food to everyday menus. Now dishes like chicken karaage and pork belly ramen seem to be as common as barbacoa and burnt ends. But with the opening of Qui (pronounced “key”), the chef’s signature restaurant, he combines the skill of his Japanese training with the homeyness of his two grandmothers’ Filipino kitchens. The “Top Chef: Texas” winner has made modern Asian fare the new flavor of Austin.

Along with his work at Uchiko, for which he won a James Beard Award, Qui became known for his East Side King trucks (he has two now, along with one brick and mortar and another on the way), painted with the artwork of Queens-based Japanese punk artist Peelander Yellow, typically in garish hues of purple or pink. But inside his new restaurant everything is more subdued, including white-on-white artwork and Kreeger Pottery plates (former Cape Cod craft gallery owner Keith Kreeger now lives in Austin). Indie standards bellow from the sound system and patrons mill about the bar, which was fashioned from a dying pecan tree previously growing through the center of the building. The chef worked closely with local artists to create plates, aprons, and fixtures.

Qui studied design at the University of Houston and abandoned that just shy of graduating. “One of the reasons I left Houston was for culinary school,” says Qui, who had fallen in love with Japanese cuisine while serving at a sushi restaurant. “But the other part of it was that I was getting into way too much trouble.” In a “Top Chef” episode, there was a cutaway to Qui casually mentioning his years of dealing hard drugs.

It might be obvious to compare Paul Qui to Los Angeles’s Roy Choi, who had a similar background of hard living and went on to open Kogi BBQ truck in 2008, at the forefront of the food truck scene. Qui wasn’t far behind, with East Side King in 2009 in the back of Liberty Bar, just a block away from his new flagship restaurant. You might also look to Momofuku’s David Chang for comparison, the influential New York restaurateur who instigated America’s craving for late-night, Asian-inspired food laden with fish sauce and chilies.

Fews chefs can match Qui’s brisk ascendency into the culinary spotlight. After signing up for Le Cordon Bleu in Austin, Qui was invited to apprentice under owner and respected sushi master Tyson Cole at Uchi, even though the student had no kitchen experience. Within a year, Qui started to rise. By 2008, Cole was looking to open a second restaurant — eventually named Uchiko — just to keep Qui motivated with a menu of his own. Philip Speer, culinary director of Uchi Restaurants in Texas, worked alongside Qui. “Paul is sort of an anomaly,” says Speer. “It was amazing how natural he was.” Speer also describes Qui as “hyper” and “scatterbrained at times.”

It was through Cole that Qui appeared on “Top Chef: Texas.” The restaurateur turned down a spot on the show and instead encouraged Qui to compete in his place. He was so confident in his protege that even before filming ended, Cole was mentally preparing for Qui’s departure from the Uchi group. Qui spent less than a month at Uchiko after he won on “Top Chef,” and when he was between restaurants, he won a James Beard Award for best chef in the Southwest.

With the “Top Chef” prize money, Qui traveled with his fiancee, Deana Saukam, stopping in Central Mexico (he fell in love with spit-grilled al pastor pork) and in Vietnam, where he went fishing on anchovy boats and discovered the crystalline by-product of fish sauce, which he uses as a condiment at Qui.

Earlier in the summer, the Qui menu included chawanmushi, a Japanese steamed egg custard with Texas corn and poached Gulf shrimp; it’s a specialty he made on “Top Chef.” There was also a thinly sliced smoked pork loin with a fat cap that melted like good pastrami. And something called “salmon butter,” olive oil-poached King salmon with a consistency delicate enough to spread on wafers along with salmon roe and caviar. But the standout was dry-aged Wagyu beef tartare, prepared in a traditional Filipino method with dense layers of spice and egg yolk creaminess.

Thomas Bailey for The Boston Globe

The interior of Qui.

As Qui expands and keeps adding new items to the menu, he doesn’t have the nurturing support system that he had earlier in his career at Uchi. Cole says, “Paul was like a son to me; it’s like a child leaving the nest. He has to make his own mistakes, but I know he’ll do well. He’s the best chef I’ve ever worked with.”

Qui, 1600 East 6th St., Austin, Texas., 512-436-9626,www.quiaustin.com

East Side King Hole in the Wall (restaurant), 2538 Guadalupe, Austin, 512-302-1470, www.eskaustin.com

East Side King at the Liberty (truck), 1618½ East 6th St., Austin, 512-422-5884, www.eskaustin.com

East Side King at the Grackle (truck), 1700 East 6th St.,
Austin, 512-422-5884, www.eskaustin.com

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Sep 4, 2013
Tim Lester

Main Street Food Truck Fridays to Resume This Weekend

The holiday weekend is over, but there is something to get excited about — the Downtown Little Rock Partnership announced that Main Street Food Truck Fridays will be starting back up this week!

On Friday (Sept. 6), three to four food truck vendors will be setting up shop from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m on the corner of Main Street and Capitol Avenue.

Here are the vendors lined up for the first day:

  • Clyde Kiddo’s
  • Kona Ice
  • Philly’s Steak Cheese
  • k-Bird

Further down the line, the Main Street Food Truck Festival is slated for Saturday, Oct. 5.

For more information about about Main Street Food Truck Fridays and the festival, contact DLRP Events Director Chellie Castellanos by calling (501) 375-0121 or emailing ccastellanos@downtownlr.com.

Also keep up with both events on Facebook here.

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Sep 4, 2013
Kim Rivers

Action Bronson Chefs Up A Food Truck Hours Before Bushwick Block Party

When one would normally be rehearsing, Action Bronson could be found feeding fans at a food truck sponsored by Ray Ban’s Envision Series. Chatting with Vice Eats prior to his performance, Bronson spoke about the experience telling of his past, present, and future passion for food with hopes to one day even open a food truck of his own.

“The dishes that I made today, the Chicken From France with the aioli is something special. I learned that from a French chef that I worked with,” told Bronson of the dishes he prepared for that day. “The lamb burger is something that I came up with. I mean, I’m sure a lot of people do variations of it, but this is my version…I want my own food truck. I’m about to change the game.”

Once a worker in his father’s restaurant and also naming his premiere mixtape “Bon Appetite”, it’s only right for the rapper to divulge back into the world of grub!

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Sep 4, 2013
Tim Lester

Main Street Food Truck Fridays to Resume This Week

The holiday weekend is over, but there is something to get excited about — the Downtown Little Rock Partnership announced that Main Street Food Truck Fridays will be starting back up this week!

On Friday (Sept. 6), three to four food truck vendors will be setting up shop from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m on the corner of Main Street and Capitol Avenue.

Here are the vendors lined up for the first day:

  • Clyde Kiddo’s
  • Kona Ice
  • Philly’s Steak Cheese
  • k-Bird

Further down the line, the Main Street Food Truck Festival is slated for Saturday, Oct. 5.

For more information about about Main Street Food Truck Fridays and the festival, contact DLRP Events Director Chellie Castellanos by calling (501) 375-0121 or emailing ccastellanos@downtownlr.com.

Also keep up with both events on Facebook here.

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Sep 4, 2013
Kim Rivers

Record food truck rally creates taste for bigger one

TAMPA — For weeks, organizer Jeremy Gomez told people he expected 10,000 people to attend the World’s Largest Food Truck Rally at the Florida State Fairgrounds.


“In my head, I was thinking probably only 6,000 would show up,” Gomez said.


Instead, an estimated 20,000 people overwhelmed 99 trucks that came from across Florida and as far away as Texas and South Carolina to serve food and attempt a new Guinness World Record on Saturday for the most trucks gathered at one event.


Despite long lines for food and parking and beer and everything else, organizers already are planning a 200-truck rally next year.


Fairgrounds officials said today the parking lot refilled three times during the nine-hour event. That usually only happens on busy weekends during state fair season.


The unexpected crush of fans caused a food shortage, with several vendors running out of menu items as early as 1:30 p.m. for an event scheduled to last until 8 p.m.


Without knowing how many customers they would have, Gomez told truck operators during the weeks leading up to the rally to limit their menus or bring less food than normal so as not to waste food and lose money.


That forced vendors Danny and Kim Flores of Holy Crepe! and several other truck operators to run to nearby groceries to restock their refrigerators. Some did so as many as three times.


Gomez said he ran through two 100-pound propane tanks and an 80-pound supply of the kangaroo meat he grilled and served on a stick. One vendor who served tropical drinks in pineapples with the tops lopped off reported customers were scalping them to others who wanted to avoid the long line.


Others persevered through more challenging problems. The Mayan Grill Food Truck broke down on Interstate 4 on the way to the rally. The vehicle was towed to the fairgrounds, where it served Central American pupusas to hundreds of customers. The owners made enough money to be towed home to Orlando.


Margaret Aiken Loflin, operator of Maggie on the Move, posted on Facebook that trucks weren’t expecting those numbers.


“We won’t be caught off guard again!” Loflin wrote.


Cars trying to reach the fairgrounds entrance on U.S. 301 were backed up for miles, Some were at a standstill while exiting I-4.


“During the fair, if you can peek toward the amphitheater from the midway and see cars backed up on I-4, you know it is a good day,” fairgrounds marketing manager Scott Merselis said. It was that way Saturday.


Fairgrounds staff struggled to keep ahead of overflowing trash cans and thirsty beer drinkers, who depleted the supply of craft beer left over from the Funshine Festival in April. The use of one main entrance also strained the parking facilities.


“We did the best with the staff we had, but obviously we need to do more and step up our game,” Merselis said.


The success of Saturday’s rally prompted Gomez to announce Monday that there will be an attempt to draw 200 trucks to the fairgrounds on March 22.


Having the rally in the spring would make for more tolerable weather compared to Saturday’s event, when temperatures reached into the low 90s. Using more than one fairground entrance already has been decided. There also will be more staff to maintain garbage and rest rooms.


Inviting more trucks in theory also would shorten lines for customers. Unless more people come. Gomez said he already has 100 trucks pledged to the March rally. Inquiries have come from as far as Ontario, Canada.


“People are so excited and Tampa is such a foodie town,” Merselis said. “It was something overdue that we need to do here, We did it once and we’ll keep doing it.”


jhouck@tampatrib.com


(813) 259-7324

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Sep 4, 2013
Tim Lester

Sweet street food goodness

This grilled corn salad gets some amped-up flavor from cilantro, garlic and smoky bacon.
(Full-size photo)

The first time I saw Mexican street corn was just after I had moved to Chicago. I was meandering down Wells Street, which was closed for a summer art fair. Out of the corner of my eye, I saw a guy with a tower of grilled corn. I walked over to get a better look and watched as he took a piece of the corn off the grill, rolled back the husk and quickly tied it off, forming a handle from the husks.

His movements were fluid as he next dipped the exposed corn into butter, then slathered it with mayo, rolled it in cheese, sprinkled it with ground chilies and squirted it with lime juice. I was mesmerized. I couldn’t wait to take that first bite. It ended up being a pivotal food experience for me. I’ve been making it at home ever since.

When corn is fresh from the field, I soak it and grill it right in the husk. The delicate sweet corn takes only a few minutes to cook and I love the slight earthiness that the corn silk and husk infuse into the kernels. When the corn isn’t as fresh and is a little starchier, I like to brush it with olive oil and place the corn with the exposed kernels directly on the cooking grates to char and blister.

This summer, I reached a new level with my Mexican street corn experiments. And like many great breakthroughs, I created the recipe out of necessity.

I wanted to serve the corn for a tasting and competition event, but I was serving 800 people and realized there was no way to grill and serve that many people quickly and deliciously. I decided to turn the street corn into a salad. That way, I could still serve the flavors of my favorite summer corn, but I could make the dish in advance.

Because I was going to be serving it cool, I decided to amp up the flavors in my normal recipe with a little cilantro and garlic to add brightness, and rich smoky bacon to complement the charred corn.

For the event, I mixed all the ingredients together and served it as a side dish to my smoked and grilled beef tenderloin. It actually worked out even better than if I had made the original corn on the cob – it’s certainly easier to eat. And, as good as my beef was, I know that it was the grilled Mexican street corn salad that scored me the top prize that night.

In this recipe, I grill the corn both in the husk and out of the husk, then slice the kernels off the cobs and make them into a decadently delicious salad. You can serve the salad with grilled beef tenderloin as I did, but it’s versatile enough to go with your favorite grilled protein – salmon, beer-can chicken, chicken thighs or backyard ribs.

Grilled Mexican Street Corn Salad

6 large ears of corn (3 with husks and silks removed, all 6 soaked in water for 10 minutes)

1 tablespoon olive oil

4 tablespoons sweet butter, melted

1/2 cup (slightly heaped) Hellmann’s mayonnaise

1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro, plus sprigs to serve

Zest and juice of 1 lime

2 cloves garlic, finely grated

1/2 teaspoon chipotle chili powder

Maldon or other flaked sea salt

1/2 cup queso anejo

1/2 cup grated Asiago cheese (or a grated Italian cheese blend), plus extra to garnish

6 slices apple wood smoked bacon, cooked and crumbled

Ground black pepper

Heat the grill for medium-high direct heat cooking.

Remove the corn from the water and pat dry. Brush the 3 ears of husked corn on all sides with the olive oil. Leave the other ears of corn in their husks.

Place all of the corn on the cooking grate. Grill, turning occasionally, until the husked corn is well-browned and charred in places, about 10 minutes. The other ears of corn will steam in their husks, but the husks themselves will be dried out and charred in places.

Remove all of the corn from the grill and set aside until cool and easily handled, about 5 minutes. Once cool enough to handle, remove the husks and silk from the 3 ears that were grilled with them on.

One at a time, stand each ear on its wide end and use a serrated knife to saw down the length of the cob to remove the kernels. Discard the cobs, then transfer the kernels to a large bowl. Mix in the melted butter, then set aside.

In a medium bowl, stir together the mayonnaise, cilantro, lime zest and juice, garlic, chili powder and a pinch of salt. Stir in both cheeses and most of the bacon, reserving a little for garnish. Add the dressing to the buttered corn kernels and mix well. Taste and season with salt and pepper. Garnish with grated cheese, cilantro and the reserved bacon. Serve chilled or at room temperature.

Servings: 4

Nutrition information per serving: 680 calories; 490 calories from fat (72 percent of total calories); 55 grams fat (20 grams saturated; 0 grams trans fats); 95 milligrams cholesterol; 39 grams carbohydrate; 3 grams fiber; 11 grams sugar; 17 grams protein; 920 milligrams sodium.

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