Browsing articles tagged with " food carts"
Jun 19, 2013
Tim Lester

White Person Enlists Other White Person To Write Book On Yellow People’s …

Okay, the headline should technically read “Anthony Bourdain Signs Graham Holliday To Write Book About Vietnamese Street Food,” but you know what? I can’t. I’m not even sure how to parse the weird mix of frustration, resignation, and bemusement I have about the idea of yet another version of White Dude Coming To Vietnam and Falling In Love With Its Amazing People And Food: Post-Colonial Narratives Are Amazon.com Gold, by Whitey White McWhiterson.

Sigh. Calming down. Calming down. Rational engagement mode, go.

First, the facts: Bourdain, who edits a special imprint for Ecco Books (and recently published a book about Texas barbecue), signed renowned freelance journalist Holliday to write a book based on his blog, Noodle Pie. The blog itself focuses on Vietnam’s street dining scene — a scene that Holliday knows more about than I would, seeing as he’s lived there for years and I’ve only been dragged there for weeks — and has won multiple awards for Holliday’s in-depth work.

Bourdain himself commissioned the book, according to a post on Noodle Pie this morning. “It is he who believed in me enough to push me to write this book in the first place,” Holliday wrote. “And it is he, who so far, has let me proceed in the writing process with zero interference. I assume that may change as soon as he wakes up to my horrendous grammar.”

It’s a good blog. I was a fan of the blog long before I started working at The Braiser, I still like it a ton, and I have no doubt that Holliday will turn out a well-written book. And Holliday certainly knows his Vietnamese food, better than most acolytes of the subject. So maybe I’m not furious that a highly talented writer’s going to write a well-publicized book exploring Vietnamese cuisine in its own motherland. Maybe it’s a good thing, and perhaps I should be happy that these guys are promoting Vietnamese food — a cuisine that I’m intensely proud of — in the United States.

Here’s the weird thing about being an immigrant minority who sees white people writing about Your Food, though — it’s like having a skateboard. (Yes, this is an extended metaphor, deal with it.) You save up money for a skateboard and then finally, after months and months of scrimping around for extra change, you finally get to purchase one. But you don’t know how to skateboard. So you’re stumbling around, trying to figure out what to do, and you keep falling off and scabbing your knees, and suddenly your distant cousin enters the area. That cousin of yours is not a bad person, and you don’t know him that well, but his family’s wealthier than yours, he’s probably going to an Ivy League college, and he’s wearing really nice boat shoes which match really well with his perfect teeth.

He sees you with your skateboard and asks if he can try it out. “Sure, whatever,” you say, but secretly you’re thinking that he’s not going to be so good at it. (Seriously, look at his stupid perfect teeth.)

Then he does a 900-degree aerial and is suddenly swooped off to participate in the X-Games.

And as he goes on to becoming Tony Kensington Hawk III, you’re left standing there, stunned and stuttering: “But…but…but…that was my skateboard.”

So I guess the skateboard in this metaphor is Vietnamese food, which is, uh, wheeling a white guy to fame and fortune. And now you don’t have a skateboard anymore. And if you do get it back, everyone will inevitably go “Hey, wasn’t that Tony Kensington Hawk III’s skateboard?” and you’ll go “NO DUDES IT WAS MINE BEFORE HE TOOK IT.”

That is the best way I’ve ever been able to describe this Asian-American impotence, and it still feels silly. Argh, why is American racial identity so difficult to explain to people? In any case, congratulations to Graham Holliday on his book deal. May he make a lot of money off my skateboard’s noodly wheels.

[Noodle Pie]

Follow Tina on Twitter @Tina_Nguyen.

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Jun 19, 2013
Jim Benson

Mt. Pleasant delays implementing change to food cart ordinance

The wagon, formerly a hand-pushed cart, had upgraded to a motor vehicle-pulled trailer and came before the city to renew its license.

However, Howard said, the city did not have an existing ordinance that the trailer would fall under.

Now, city commissioners are looking at updating the ordinance, but are not sure how to handle larger food trucks, which compete with existing downtown brick-and-mortar businesses.

Kyle Stahl, owner of the Wiener Wagon, spoke to the city during the public comment portion of the meeting.

“We very much like being downtown,” he said. “We feel we have changed the atmosphere downtown.”

Stahl, who has sold hot dogs out of both a food cart and food truck since August of 2012, said he gets comments from customers saying they like the big city feel that the downtown merchants give.

Jose DelCastillo, owner of Jose’s Pig Gig, echoed Stahl’s comments.

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Jun 19, 2013
Tim Lester

Chutney at street festival left 400 people with food poisoning, say officials

Uncooked curry leaves in a chutney left more than 400 people who ate at a street food festival with diarrhoea and vomiting or salmonella poisoning, health officials have found.

The leaves were contaminated with several different bacteria, experts found, which led to 29 confirmed cases of salmonella at the Street Spice festival in Newcastle in February and March.

An investigation by Public Health England (PHE) and Newcastle city council found 25 of the 29 cases had developed a strain of salmonella never found in people or food in Britain before.

According to an official report, further laboratory analysis suggested other organisms may also have caused illness including E coli and shigella.

Some of the 413 affected were found to have more than one of these infections at the same time.

No one will face prosecution because there was seen to be a lack of clear advice about the dangers of using raw curry leaves in recipes, and in general hygiene levels at the three-day event were good.

Dr Kirsty Foster, chair of the outbreak control team and consultant in health protection with PHE, said: “This was one of the largest outbreaks of gastro-intestinal illness associated with herbs or spices in the country. In addition, it was the first time one of the strains of salmonella was detected in the UK.

“However, herbs and spices are known to be potential sources of salmonella and other organisms, and have been reported in scientific literature as the source of infection in a number of outbreaks across the country.

“But it is unclear whether there is widespread understanding among food handlers and the public about the potential for infection when using these products raw.

“That is why we have reported our findings to the Food Standards Agency, recommending that advice is developed for the food industry and the public about the use of raw curry leaves.

“While this is being developed, our advice to the public is to cook curry leaves thoroughly if they are to be used in recipes and to be aware of the risk of infection if using them raw.”

Stephen Savage, Newcastle city council’s director of regulation and public protection said: “Our environmental health officers have worked very closely with experts in health protection since the outbreak of this illness.

“We have carried out extensive investigations and tests and have identified the source of this outbreak as being imported contaminated curry leaves used raw in a chutney.

“Having carefully considered the facts, we have decided against formal action in this case.

“We are also recommending to the Food Standards Agency that awareness is raised with importers, exporters and port health authorities about the labelling, and in particular the instructions for use of curry leaves and other herbs.”

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Jun 19, 2013
Tim Lester

Chutney at street festival left 400 people with food poisoning, say officials

Uncooked curry leaves in a chutney left more than 400 people who ate at a street food festival with diarrhoea and vomiting or salmonella poisoning, health officials have found.

The leaves were contaminated with several different bacteria, experts found, which led to 29 confirmed cases of salmonella at the Street Spice festival in Newcastle in February and March.

An investigation by Public Health England (PHE) and Newcastle city council found 25 of the 29 cases had developed a strain of salmonella never found in people or food in Britain before.

According to an official report, further laboratory analysis suggested other organisms may also have caused illness including E coli and shigella.

Some of the 413 affected were found to have more than one of these infections at the same time.

No one will face prosecution because there was seen to be a lack of clear advice about the dangers of using raw curry leaves in recipes, and in general hygiene levels at the three-day event were good.

Dr Kirsty Foster, chair of the outbreak control team and consultant in health protection with PHE, said: “This was one of the largest outbreaks of gastro-intestinal illness associated with herbs or spices in the country. In addition, it was the first time one of the strains of salmonella was detected in the UK.

“However, herbs and spices are known to be potential sources of salmonella and other organisms, and have been reported in scientific literature as the source of infection in a number of outbreaks across the country.

“But it is unclear whether there is widespread understanding among food handlers and the public about the potential for infection when using these products raw.

“That is why we have reported our findings to the Food Standards Agency, recommending that advice is developed for the food industry and the public about the use of raw curry leaves.

“While this is being developed, our advice to the public is to cook curry leaves thoroughly if they are to be used in recipes and to be aware of the risk of infection if using them raw.”

Stephen Savage, Newcastle city council’s director of regulation and public protection said: “Our environmental health officers have worked very closely with experts in health protection since the outbreak of this illness.

“We have carried out extensive investigations and tests and have identified the source of this outbreak as being imported contaminated curry leaves used raw in a chutney.

“Having carefully considered the facts, we have decided against formal action in this case.

“We are also recommending to the Food Standards Agency that awareness is raised with importers, exporters and port health authorities about the labelling, and in particular the instructions for use of curry leaves and other herbs.”

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Jun 19, 2013
Jim Benson

Mamak Cart Serves Up Malaysian Food

mamakcart.JPGLyonsIf you see people carrying bowls of barley lentil or curry laksa ramen soup away from a mustard yellow and silver food cart on a warm summer evening, your instinct might be to pass by the first–and second–time staring in awe. Don’t walk away–you’ve located one of the most unique food carts around, serving exotic dishes you don’t know how to pronounce.

Mamak, New York City’s first Malaysian street cart, has operated for almost two months serving lunch in Hanover Square and, more recently, dinner off the corner of North Sixth Street and Bedford Avenue.

In Malaysia, carts offering a variety of curries and stews are about as common as a jumbo pretzel in Midtown, so chef and owner Erik Cheah, who hails from that country, saw an opportunity to improve upon the lunch and late night offerings for suits and skaters alike. Plus, running an outdoor food operation means you can do things like see the sunset and get fresh air, elements that are not necessarily common in stationary restaurant kitchens.

Cheah’s pedigree includes training under Chef Jonathan Benno of Per Se for several months, and he grew up in a family full of restaurateurs. His father operated a street cart in Malaysia, and other members of his family are involved with various southeast Asian restaurants throughout the greater New York City area.

This background not only provided him cherished family recipes from which he could build from but also the knowledge that a successful business comes down to a successful location. His Brooklyn spot, which long housed a stationary taco stand and recently hosted a Korean BBQ cart, is slowly developing a clientele of late night commuters stopping by on their walk home. Meanwhile, having a set-up in Hanover Square helps feed the masses of Wall Street denizens looking for a great meal at a fair price.

It took Cheah roughly seven months to finalize his diverse menu. Weekly specials are continuously changing based on the feedback received from customers, and seasonality also plays a role in the items that are featured (e.g. the current spring menu features a lighter lemongrass-based curry soup). Barley pandanus, an iced drink made with a floral plant common in Malaysian cooking and sweetened with rock sugar, has a sweet rice-like taste and makes for a nice accompaniment in the sweltering heat. Some entrees that made the final menu took into account the differentiated American palate. The ramly burger, which features a fried egg, cheddar, cabbage, and sweet chili ketchup, was designed as bridge between Malaysian and American cultures, and it can help convince a customer to come back and try something a bit more out of their comfort zone. That customer might consider the beef rendang curry, the highlight of the menu as suggested by the chef. It’s a dish that embodies the balance central to Malaysian cooking: Boneless shortrib is coated in papadum and sambal chili, doused in four different sauces, and seated next to a hard boiled egg on a bed of coconut- and pandanus-flavored jasmine rice.

Because Malaysian food takes considerable time to prepare–everything is homemade here, and the chili sauce takes at least two hours to complete–many of the challenges Mamak faces are very different from other operations. “We are a food cart that sells restaurant quality food,” Cheah notes. Dishes are prepped in a commissary kitchen and take up to five hours to finalize, and then Cheah and his team have to deal with transport issues.

Cheah’s eventual goal is to open a brick-and-mortar location of Mamak, but he’s content for the time being. “Keep calm and curry on,” he laughs, his experience in building restaurants a unique asset that is not necessarily common with all up and coming hidden gem hopefuls.

Mamak typically comes out of hiding from 12 to 3 pm at Hanover Square and from 5:30 pm to 10:00 pm at N. 6th and Bedford with expanded hours on Friday and Saturday night. The cart also delivers, caters, and makes guest appearances outside of music venues. Check out @lovemamak for information on new locations and hours of operation.



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Jun 19, 2013
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Festival feeds 4000 people – The Record


Mouthwatering aromas from a dozen different food trucks wafted across the Carson Valley Inn parking lot Saturday during the casino’s inaugural Food Truck Festival More than 4,000 people dined on hamburgers, hotdogs, pizza, pasta, tri-tip sandwiches, tacos, wraps and more. Gardnerville resident Bart Andrews and his family shared tastes from a selection of food trucks. Andrews couldn’t decide if he preferred the marinara and Parmesan cheese-covered french fries or the hotdog topped with bacon and fried peppers the most. “I don’t eat them at home, only here or at a fair,” he said of the hotdog. “It was very good.” …

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Jun 19, 2013
Kim Rivers

Gourmet ‘zombie’ hot dog truck named best Dayton food truck



Zombie Dogz was voted the Best Food Truck in Dayton in a poll that ran on the Dayton Business Journal's Web site.

Zombie Dogz was voted the Best Food Truck in Dayton in a poll that ran on the Dayton Business Journal’s Web site.










Olivia Barrow
Staff Reporter- Dayton Business Journal

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Dayton’s food truck explosion has created a lot of new fans, and they were vocal in a recent poll on which food truck is the best.

Zombie Dogz swept the competition with 46 percent of the nearly 500 votes cast.

The gourmet hot dog truck sells items such as the “Hunk a Hunk of Rotting Flesh,” which includes an all-beef frank, topped with bacon and pan-seared bananas.

Harvest Mobile Cuisine received 24 percent of the votes and Fressa picked up 11 percent. Caribbacanas, McNasty’s and Ringo’s North Star Mobile Eatery all received 5 percent or less.

Although only six trucks were named in the poll, many others got plugs in the comments, including Cheeky Meat Pies, which started out as a booth in the PNC 2nd Street Market, and added on a food truck and this summer is also serving quick snacks at Riverscape Metropark in the Silver Fern Cafe.

Some less well-known trucks also got mentions in the comments, including Om Nom Mobile Cafe, Sweet Eats Bake Shop and Mobile Treat Truck, The Duck Wagon and C’est Cheese.

E-mail obarrow@bizjournals.com. Call (937) 528-4427.

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Jun 19, 2013
Kim Rivers

Community Hospice’s Food Truck Round-Up celebrates Nursing Assistants … – Florida Times

Community Hospice hosts the Great Food Truck Round-Up from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday at eight locations in Jacksonville, Orange Park, Macclenny, Fernandina Beach and St. Augustine to celebrate Nursing Assistants Week (June 16-22).

And while all Northeast Florida nursing assistants (With employer-issued photo ID) are eligible for a free lunch from the local food trucks at the Round-Up locations, others can buy lunch and celebrate the week.

Community Hospice is honoring the nursing assistants who give comfort and support at its locations as well as at other Jacksonville health care facilities.

The food trucks will be at the St. Catherine Labouré Manor at St. Vincent’s Riverside, Orange Park Medical Center, Quality Health of Fernandina Beach, Community Hospice Bailey Family Center for Caring at Flagler Hospital and Macclenny Nursing and Rehabilitation Center. Others will be at the Community Hospice Charles M. Neviaser Educational Institute at 4266 Sunbeam Road, the Community Hospice Anne and Donald McGraw Center for Caring next to Mayo Clinic at 4715 Worrall Way, and Lanier Manor at 12740 Lanier Road.

For more information, go to facebook.com/communityhospicenefl.

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Jun 19, 2013
Kim Rivers

Brattleboro serves up new food truck ordinance

Tuesday June 18, 2013

BRATTLEBORO — Over the past few years the number of food trucks in Brattleboro has increased and on any given day a hungry customer can get a hot dog, a maple syrup shake or food from Jamaica, Vietnam or Thailand.

But if you are looking for some zoning ordinances to go with your banh mi they can’t be found.

Now the Planning Commission is cooking up a recipe to fix that.

The Brattleboro Planning Commission is proposing amendments to the zoning ordinance to define food carts and mobile food units and also to regulate how the food stands can be set up on private property.

Under the new ordinance vendors would have to apply for an annual town permit to operate their carts.

A public hearing is scheduled for June 24 at 7:15 p.m. in the Selectboard Meeting Room to gather comments on the proposed ordinance.

“We are seeing more interest in mobile food units all over the country, and there are more of them in Brattleboro now than ever before,” said Brattleboro Planning Director Rod Francis. “Right now we have nothing in our ordinance and the Planning Commission feels like the town should have some control over how they are operated.”

Francis said the proposed ordinance does not address health standards concerning food service. Those are handled by the state.

Nor does the proposed ordinance change any of the existing zoning rules for public spaces, such as sidewalks, which are already regulated.

The new ordinance

would attempt to protect pedestrians and drivers, Francis says, by establishing parking, signage, trash receptacle, right-of-way and site-line standards.

It also allows restaurants as a permitted use in the industrial zone, which would pave the way for mobile food carts to set up in industrial zones.

Francis said the issue arose as the town was looking at Chapter 11 in the zoning ordinance and it became apparent that there were not any regulations governing the semi-permanent structures which are typically set up for seven or eight months of the year.

If a property owner wants to build a permanent deck or shed a permit is needed and Francis said the planning commission wanted to give the town some authority to protect the public when food stands and mobile carts settle down for the season.

“Restaurant owners need to get a business license and one of the reasons for establishing an ordinance is to make sure everyone is treated the same way,” Francis said.

Under the proposed rule, the zoning administrator would approve the permits.

The zoning administrator would visit the site and determine if the food stand met the requirements of the ordinance.

If the permit is rejected the applicant would be able to appeal the decision to the Development Review Board.

Planning Commission Chairman James Valente said the commission worked hard to set up the new ordinance to try to protect the public while not discouraging entrepreneurs from coming to Brattleboro.

Valente said the commission also debated the differences between semi-permanent structures, and those that come to town for a weekend event, such as The Strolling of the Heifers.

That debate, he said, is still not settled and the commission is going to figure out if any new rules are needed for food cart owners who only set up in town for a day or two.

“It’s a challenge to come up with an ordinance that addresses the concerns about semi-permanent structures without burdening potential weekend vendors,” Valente said. “There was a feeling on the board that this issue was pressing, and that we needed to do something now while making sure people who were not putting down roots had more freedom.”

Valente also said with more food stands opening the commission wanted to protect the permanent business owners who have to apply for a business license and adhere to town standards and rules.

“All of a sudden here is another subcategory that is not subjected to any of our laws and so we are trying to address that,” Valente said. “Right now it’s like the Wild West out there and we want everyone to play by the same rules.”

After the June 24 hearing, if there are not any major changes, the proposed ordinance would go before the Selectboard, where it would receive another reading before a final vote by the Selectboard.

The ordinance would then go into effect after 21 days.

Francis said the zoning administrator would walk around town and reach out to the food stand operators to encourage them to apply for the new permits if the ordinance is approved by the Selectboard.

The permits would be active through July 1, when the owner would have to reapply for another season.

Howard Weiss-Tisman can be reached at 802-254-2311, ext. 279, or hwtisman@reformer.com. Follow Howard on Twitter @HowardReformer.

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