Browsing articles tagged with " food carts"
Nov 19, 2014
Jim Benson

Buki

Takoyaki is like the corn dog of Japan—a savory snack for
streetside stalls and festivals. But Japan being Japan, the little fried
flour balls are generally filled not with pork but chewy octopus, then
covered with a heaping pile of seaweed and the same bonito fish flakes
sold in American pet stores as cat treats.

Buki food cart opened
at the new Tidbit pod in August, serving takoyaki that its
Taiwanese-born chef encountered while living in Japan, smothered in
Japanese mayo and takoyaki sauce, which is a bit like a thickened
Worcestershire sauce. The traditional octopus balls, which are crisp
outside and warmly gloopy on the inside—and wildly fishy from the
bonito—are $7 for eight pingpong-sized snacks. Your utensil is a curled
piece of bamboo that acts as a toothpick. The cart also offers a “bara”
octopus dish, with soft steamed octopus served with a ginger scallion
sauce.

The octopus is the
best, but less adventurous eaters may want to try the “Western blend”
with sausage and cheese, and a jalapeño-cheese option called the Bomber
that’s topped with bacon instead of fish. A spicy version fills the
balls with kimchee and uses spicy mayo. All are a fun parade of
textures, not quite a meal but a satisfying snack with a beer from the
Scout cart. For dessert, you can order little fish-shaped cookies called
taiyaki—filled with bean paste, chocolate or Nutella.

But that Scout beer
is essential, and don’t order hungry. The takoyaki is cooked slowly in a
special pan, and for more than two orders the wait may be about 20
minutes; the cart doesn’t have the capacity to keep multiple orders
going simultaneously. So don’t treat Buki as a restaurant; treat Tidbit
as a street fair. Buki is your food concession.

  • Order this: Octopus takoyaki ($7) or octopus with dipping sauce.

EAT: Buki, 2880 SE Division St. (Tidbit Food Farm and
Garden pod), 360-931-1541. Noon-9 pm Wednesday-Thursday, noon-10 pm
Friday-Sunday.

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Nov 18, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Cinema To Provide Free Food, Movie

Photo courtesy of UCSB First

Photo courtesy of UCSB First

UCSB First will host Food Truck Cinema tomorrow at 7:30p.m. on the UCen Lawn to advocate student donation to the university after graduation.

Food Truck Cinema will provide free food to attendees from local food trucks The Burger Bus and Georgia’s Smokehouse, as well as a screening of the film “Anchorman.” UCSB First is a student-run committee sponsored by the UC Santa Barbara Foundation charged with encouraging alumni to donate to the university, and one of its responsibilities is to host campus-related events for seniors throughout the year.

According to UCSB First co-chair and fourth-year political science and communication major Jessica Fenton, this is the first year UCSB First has hosted an event featuring free food truck eats and a film.

UCSB First co-chair and fourth-year political science and film studies double major Anne Hamner said UCSB First started Food Truck Cinema to get students more interested in the University in hopes of making them more likely donate as alumni. Hamner said philanthropy is essential to helping raise UCSB’s national ranking.

“We really encourage students to give back to the school once they graduate,” Hamner said. “Even if a student gives one dollar or five dollars, it ups our ranking because it shows alumni involvement.”

According to Fenton, UCSB First will also use Food Truck Cinema as a platform to announce the senior class gift, which was voted upon by members of this year’s senior class. The winning result, Fenton said, will determine which of three options on the ballot will have a fund opened on its behalf at the end of the school year: Associated Students Food Bank, A.S. Academic Resource Fund or the Student Safety Enhancement Fund.

“[A senior class gift] is an opportunity for seniors to create a legacy and stay connected with their alma mater,” Fenton said. “UC Santa Barbara is a strong community, and giving to this gift demonstrates our firm belief in Gauchos helping Gauchos.”

UCSB First is also partnering with the Associate Students Food Bank by recommending that attendees bring canned food donations to the event, according to A.S. Food Bank coordinator and alumna Tuyen Nguyen.

Nguyen also said 10 percent of the proceeds from the food trucks will also go to A.S. Food Bank.

“If there is something in the back of your pantry that you are willing and able to part with, it could always be used to help other students who utilize our pantry,” Nguyen said. “We also encourage [buying food] in whatever capacity people can engage and be able to give back.”

Food Truck Cinema, Fenton said, will also be hosting tabling from various student organizations like Dance Marathon, Active Minds, DJ Club and the Education Abroad Program.

“We’re just trying to provide more fun things for students to do,” Fenton said. “This is an opportunity for students to learn more about their campus and where they can get involved in.”

According to Hamner, deciding what movie to screen was a difficult decision due to factors like appropriateness and popularity.

“It actually took such a long time to pick a movie because we wanted to do a film that everyone would like and be able to relate to,” Hamner said.

In the end, “Anchorman” was the right choice, according to Fenton.

“We thought it was a fun movie and kind of nostalgic to most people,” Fenton said. “Plus everyone loves Will Ferrell.”

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Nov 18, 2014
Kim Rivers

Blu Olive food truck moves into Hey Hey

Bebe left Hey Hey Bar and Grill, the Merion Village neighborhood bar has a new food truck in residence. Italian-leaning Blu Olive opens inside the Hey Hey tonight, Nov. 18, starting at 5 p.m.

“I don’t think we can use the word pop-up,” says Blu Olive owner Steve Carmean, adding he signed a lease committing them to the space for at least a year. This will be the best place to find Blu Olive’s menu of sandwiches, burgers, pastas and salads this winter (aside from the truck’s regular gig at Bexley Natural Market on Wednesday evenings). Carmean adds the move into Hey Hey will allow them to expand the menu and add items that may take longer to prepare—taking advantage of customers willing to wait a few extra minutes for food in a dining setting, than in a food truck line.

“One of the things I’ve learned since I first started this truck with my daughter is chefs like to create,” Carmean says. “You’ve got to let them create.”

For example, the grilled salmon sandwich with lemon aioli will be featured as a salmon club on focaccia made by local baker Matt Swint of Matija Breads (the grilled cheese with walnut and arugula pesto will also get the same bread update). There will also be a Caesar salad with house-made dressing. Carmean and chef Alexander Martin will also have access to a fryer—something they don’t have now on the truck—so fried food items may grace the menu in the future, too. (The Hey Hey’s signature sauerkraut balls will stay on the menu—a non-negotiable line item in the agreement.)

Portion sizes will also change to reflect the sit-down setting, like doubling the size of the lemon garlic hummus (normally a side) to a sharable appetizer size.

Blu Olive will serve 5 to 9 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday, and 5 to 11 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

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Nov 18, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Stops: November 18

Happy Tuesday, food truck followers! Don’t forget your heavy jacket when you head outside to try some chowder and cider at Red Hook Lobster Pound or miso soup with tofu at Yellow Vendor.

Sign up for our new Food Truck Stops daily newsletter to have a roundup of locations delivered directly to your inbox.

Capitol Hill (First and C sts., SE), where you’ll find Popped! Republic and Yumpling.

Chinatown (Seventh and G sts., NW), where you’ll find DC Crab Cake Co.

Farragut Square (17th and I sts., NW), where you’ll find Arepa Zone, Sate Truck, and Yellow Vendor.

Franklin Square (13th and K sts., NW), where you’ll find Captain Cookie.

Friendship Heights (Western and Wisconsin Aves., NW), where you’ll find Kimchi BBQ Taco and Pars Kabob.

L’Enfant (Sixth St. and Maryland Ave., SW), where you’ll find Carnivore BBQ, Crepe Love, and Hungry Heart.

Metro Center (12th and G sts., NW), where you’ll find Capital Chicken Waffles, Chatpat Truck, Pho Junkies, Carolina Q, and District Taco.

Montgomery County, where you’ll find Red Hook Lobster Pound (Rockville).

Navy Yard (First and M sts., SE), where you’ll find DC Slices, South Meets East, and Dangerously Delicious Pies.

NoMa (First and M sts., NE), where you’ll find Pars Kabob, Sate Truck, and Zesty Kabob.

Northern Virginia, where you’ll find Chef Seb, Guapo’s, (Ballston), Choupi Crepes, Red Hook Lobster Pound, (Rosslyn), Tortuga, Turkish Kabob (Reston), and Borinquen Lunch Box (Alexandria).

Patriot’s Plaza (Third and E sts., SW), where you’ll find Sundevich.

State Department (around 21st St. and Virginia Ave., NW), where you’ll find Basil Thyme.

20th and L Streets, Northwest, where you’ll find DC Slices, Habebe, and BONMi.

Union Station (North Capitol St. and Massachusetts Ave., NE), where you’ll find Sang on Wheels and TaKorean.

Sign up for our new Food Truck Stops daily newsletter to have a roundup of locations delivered directly to your inbox.

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Nov 18, 2014
Tim Lester

Business Group Calls For Crackdown On 34th Street Food Carts

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) — The number of food carts along 34th Street, particularly during the holiday shopping season, has gotten out of hand, a Midtown business group charges.

The 34th Street Partnership wants a ban on food carts along 34th, including on Sundays, when vending rules now don’t apply, WCBS 880′s Alex Silverman reported.

“It’s wall-to-wall carts,” Pisark described of the Sundays just before Christmas.

Business Group Calls For Crackdown On 34th Street Food Carts

foam Business Group Calls For Crackdown On 34th Street Food Cartswcbs880 audio logo Business Group Calls For Crackdown On 34th Street Food Carts

Businesses complain about smoke and litter produced by the carts, and over the past three years, a few hundred people have complained to 311 that they’ve gotten sick from the food.

“It’s about city inspections, which are not as frequent as brick-and-mortar restaurants,” Pisark said.

The carts don’t get letter grades like restaurants, but they do get evaluated.

“The health department comes in every couple of weeks and investigates everything,” Magdy Abdelgowad told CBS2′s Elise Finch, “We clean it every single day. At night it gets cleaned from everything. The food is every day fresh.”

Matthew Shapiro is an attorney with the Street Vendor Project, a non-profit advocacy group. He said that food cart vendors are regulated and inspected and have their own burden as small businesses.

“The business associations have historically tried to remove a certain type of vendor from the street and put what they think is an appropriate vendor on the sidewalk. Just because you represent a group of business owners doesn’t mean you get to control the way the sidewalk looks,” he said.

In Crain’s New York Business, Sean Basinski with the Street Vendor Project, accused the 34th Street Partnership’s president of being racist. The vendors are largely minorities and immigrants.

“We believe Dan Biederman hates vendors and is a racist against [them],” Basinski said.

“Racism doesn’t have anything to do with it,” Pisark told Silverman. “It’s about quality of life.”

Peter, who has been selling hot dogs in front of Macy’s for a few years, said he would prefer to keep his cart where it is, “but what am I going to do? The law is the law.”

New Yorkers appeared split over what should happen next.

“All of my favorite restaurants are graded so they’re no different especially because in New York a lot of people go to the trucks to eat. They should be graded the same way,” Richard Green said.

“I think food carts are just fine. I’ve eaten from food carts many times. It’s a quick and convenient way to eat,” Joan Walton added.

The food fight is expected to ramp up in the coming weeks since more vendors hit this area during the holiday shopping season.

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Nov 18, 2014
Jim Benson

York accepting food-cart permit applications

York is holding an open application period for food-cart permits, according to a news release.

The application deadline is Nov. 30. There are 10 permits for dedicated locations in the Central Business District and 20 permits for business owners interested in operating outside the downtown, the release states.

The 10 locations in the Central Business District include: the northeast corner of Continental Square; the southwest corner of Continental Square; the unit block of East Market Street; the 100 block of South George Street; northeast corner of North George and Philadelphia Street; 100 block of West Market Street; bus station between Mason Avenue and King Street; north and south sides of West Market Street at the Rail Trail; and the 100 block of West Philadelphia Street.

For more information about the application process, call the Department of Permits, Planning and Zoning at 849-2256.

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Nov 17, 2014
Kim Rivers

Canned Ham food truck

DENVER — This week our Monday food truck specializes in fresh food from all the regions of Colorado. It’s a traveling eatery known for its homemade cuisine.

Our Ken Clark checks out the Canned Ham food truck.

 

 

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Nov 17, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Stops: November 17

Happy Monday, food truck followers! Many vendors are taking a rain check today, but you can still grab a lunch of ginger spice tofu from Woodland’s Vegan Bistro or a North Indian thali (vegetarian tasting) aboard Chatpat Truck.

Sign up for our new Food Truck Stops daily newsletter to have a roundup of locations delivered directly to your inbox.

Chinatown (Seventh and G sts., NW), where you’ll find Tasty Kabob.

Farragut Square (17th and I sts., NW), where you’ll find Meski Healthy 2 Go and Woodland’s Vegan Bistro.

Franklin Square (13th and K sts., NW), where you’ll find Chatpat Truck.

L’Enfant (Sixth St. and Maryland Ave., SW), where you’ll find Basil Thyme, Captain Cookie, Phonation, and Wassub.

Metro Center (12th and G sts., NW), where you’ll find Pedro Vinny’s.

Navy Yard (First and M sts., SE), where you’ll find DC Slices.

Northern Virginia, where you’ll find Chef Seb (Courthouse) and Over the Rice (Rosslyn).

State Department (around 21st St. and Virginia Ave., NW), where you’ll find Crepes Parfait and DC Slices.

20th and L Streets, Northwest, where you’ll find Popped! Republic and Tasty Kabob.

Union Station (North Capitol St. and Massachusetts Ave., NE), where you’ll find Pho Junkies.

Too many good trucks to decide? Check out our guide to the Top 25 Food Trucks in Washington and the Wheelie Awards for best individual dishes, deals, and more.

Sign up for our new Food Truck Stops daily newsletter to have a roundup of locations delivered directly to your inbox.

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Nov 17, 2014
Kim Rivers

Park n Pork BBQ owners, friends raising money after food truck fire

Jennifer and Brad Vieux have been out of business since their Park n pork BBQ food truck was destroyed by fire late last month.

Now, the couple and their supporters have launched a couple of fund-raising efforts to get the truck back on the road.

One is an event scheduled for 6 p.m. to midnight Friday at Joe’s Oldtown Bar Grill, 222 N. Washington. Admission is $10, and the evening will include food and drink specials plus music from the Outlaws. All money raised will go to the rebuilding fund.

Also, at the urging of several friends and fellow food truckers, the Vieuxs have launched a Go Fund Me account that so far has raised $830. Those who want to help can go to the website and donate money to the cause.

The couple is hoping to settle with the insurance company soon. Their policy will replace the truck itself and the cooking equipment, but they’re out the cost food, supplies, a cash register, an iPad, pots, pans and coolers that were lost in the fire, which happened when Jennifer was driving to the October Food Trucks at the Fountain event.

She was on McLean near Exploration Place when she smelled smoke pulled over. The truck was quickly engulfed in flames, and fire officials determined that the fire had started in the engine and spread.

The Vieuxs opened their food truck in April and had been active members of the local food truck scene.

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