Browsing articles tagged with " food carts"
Aug 25, 2014
Jim Benson

One-stop eating at the Vancouver Food Cart Festival

Many trends have developed over the last several years when it comes to Vancouver eateries, but perhaps the best one can be summed up in one word: mobility.

There are fleets of gourmet food trucks operating on the streets of Vancouver and with so much variety, it can be tough choosing which one to sample.

This summer has made that choice a lot simpler with the Vancouver Food Cart Festival. In case you haven’t had the chance to attend, it takes place at 215 W 1st Ave. (between the Cambie Street Bridge and the Olympic Village) every Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. throughout the summer. With summer unofficially over next week, you have one final chance over Labour Day weekend.

The location of the Food Cart Festival is fantastic. Centrally located in a transit accessible area means you don’t have to go out of your way to check it out. Whether your day plans involve walking the seawall, checking out some exhibits at Science World or visiting Granville Island, it’s easy to plan having lunch at this assembly of culinary delights.

There is more than just food at the Food Cart Festival, so your fun-filled day doesn’t have to take a time out while you eat. The festival also features community markets, craft food vendors, DJs, live music, activities for kids and urban gardening. When you attend the Food Cart Festival, you don’t even really need to go anywhere else to have a great afternoon.

Among the 20-plus trucks you’ll have to choose from are the highly popular Holy Perogy, Mom’s Grilled Cheese, Dougie Dog (try the mac and cheese dog, it’s amazing!), Yolk’s Breakfast, Chili Tank, Didi’s Greek and the Aussie Pie Guy. No matter what your taste buds are in the mood for, odds are you’ll find it at the Vancouver Food Cart Festival (and it will taste incredible).

If you live in the suburbs and don’t feel like making the trip to Vancouver, you’ll be happy to know that a smaller version of the Food Cart Festival takes place every Saturday until Aug. 30 from 12-5 p.m. at Holland Park in Surrey. Although it doesn’t feature as many trucks as the festival downtown, there is still a wide variety of delicious food and beverages from which to choose.

Attendance to the Food Cart Festival is free for VanCity and Car2Go members, and also free if you bring a non-perishable food donation for the Greater Vancouver Food Bank Society.

It’s going to be a while before this event comes back next summer, and you’ll miss the convenience of having all these amazing trucks in the same location, so be sure to check it out.

The only difficult thing will be deciding what to eat.

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Aug 25, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Rodeo Going to Be Huge, Set for September

The Central Virginia Food Truck Rodeo is set for Sunday, Sept. 14 at Chesterfield Towne Center.

Think of it as a mega-food truck court plus music and beer – all day long.

Meaning you can graze all day from Richmond’s best food trucks, sip Richmond craft brew and listen to music – all in one place.

Admission is free.

The event is the branchild of Chef Patrick Harris of Boka Taco fame. He’s basing the event off the wildly popular Downtown Food Truck Rodeo in Raleigh, N.C. that draws 20,000 people.

He’s working with Laurin Willis and The Virginia Museum of Radio Concert Entertainment (VMRCE) to book the music. Willis has worked with The National, Innsbrook After Hours and other local music venues.

If the event is a success, he hopes to host it seasonally in the spring, summer and fall.

Read our original story here.

Note the name change to Central Virginia Food Truck Rodeo.

The trucks and the music are still being finalized, but you can expect 35 food trucks, 25 craft beers from Richmond and Virginia and a handful of the following headliners:

35 Food Trucks:

Alchemy Coffee

Boka Truck

Bonbon Asian Fusion

Carytown Burgers Fries

Curbside Creations

The Dog Wagon

Dressed Presssed

Gelati Celesti

Goatocado

Grilled Meats Treats

Happy Empanada

Hungry Turtle

Jadean’s Smokin’ Six O

The Jazzy Express

King of Pops

Kona Ice

Mister Softee

Monique’s Crepes

Mosaic

Opa

Pizza Tonight

Slideways Mobile Bistro

25 Virginia/Richmond Craft Beers:

Ardent Craft Ales

Center of the Universe Brewing

Hardywood Park Craft Brewery

Devils Backbone Brewing Company

Starr Hill Brewing Company

Bold Rock Cidery

Legend Brewing Company

And many more from Brown Distributing

Music

“American Idol” alum Geodeon Luke the People (from Nashville)

Cosby (local)

Everwilde (local)

Additional local artists TBD

It’s an impressive line-up meant to entertain all day. Harris expects 6,000 to 9,000 people to turn out.

“Our goal is to create a family friendly event that we can recreate 2-3 times a year; allowing people of the Richmond area to see what’s new and exciting in the regarding food, music, and local business,” says Bobby Wilcox with the VMRCE.

Central Virginia Food Truck Rodeo

Sunday, Sept. 14

Chesterfield Town Center

Noon to 7 p.m.

Free

Blankets chairs welcome, no coolers

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Aug 25, 2014
Kim Rivers

A Minnesota pastor’s pulpit: Not just your ordinary food truck

Pastor Margaret Kelly runs a food truck ministry she calls Shobi's Table where she serving free calzones she makes from scratch and reads some Bible verses to those assembled on the sidewalk on Payne Avenue in St. Paul, on Thursday, August 14, 2014.Scott Takushi, AP

Pastor Margaret Kelly runs a food truck ministry she calls “Shobi’s Table” where she serving free calzones she makes from scratch and reads some Bible verses to those assembled on the sidewalk on Payne Avenue in St. Paul, on Thursday, August 14, 2014.

ST. PAUL, Minn. — There are a couple of clues that the mobile kitchen parked every Thursday at lunchtime on Payne Avenue on St. Paul’s East Side this summer isn’t just another food truck.

First of all, the food — hot calzones — is free. And the person who drives the truck is a young woman in a clerical collar who likes to say, “Peace be with you.”

Her name is Margaret Kelly, a 33-year-old preacher’s kid, ex-French chef and former mental health case manager. She’s now a pastor, and the food truck is her church, the St. Paul Pioneer Press reported.

It’s not a typical church, but Kelly isn’t your typical Lutheran pastor. She’s a gay woman who started her training at Luther Seminary in St. Paul at a time when the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America didn’t allow gays in committed relationships to serve as clergy members.

“I was fairly confident that change was coming,” Kelly said. She was right. In 2009, the church voted to allow people in committed same-gender relationships to be ministers.

After seminary, Kelly, who also has a master’s degree in social work, worked for about three years for a nonprofit mental health agency. She was married in 2011 in a church wedding. She was ordained in 2012 and legally married to her wife, Eileen, last August, soon after same-sex marriage became legal in Minnesota. That wedding was conducted by her father, a pastor in Bemidji.

“We made the front page of the Bemidji paper,” Kelly said.

Last year is also when she came up with the idea of a food-truck church. When she was a mental health case manager, Kelly found that people in poverty often lack access to healthy food, reliable transportation, meaningful work and meaningful community.

She thought that one solution could be a church on wheels that drives to where people are, offering free food and prayer to the poor, homeless and near-homeless. The people helping to serve the meals would be from the community that the truck is serving.

“Increased access to food that is cooked and served by those who need the increased access” is how Kelly describes it.

“We don’t simply want it to be a church making handouts,” said Kelly’s boss, the Rev. Paul Erickson, assistant to the bishop for evangelical mission in the ELCA’s St. Paul Area Synod. “We are all ministers to and with each other.”

To support the project, Kelly was able to get grant money from the national church as well as local churches such as St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church in Mahtomedi.

St. Andrew’s also was able to put Kelly in touch with Peter Bolstorff, a Stillwater management consultant, who with his wife, Cary, started an organization called Mobile Action Ministries that owns a food truck serving the needy in the east-metro area.

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Aug 25, 2014
Kim Rivers

St. Paul pastor’s pulpit? A food truck

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — There are a couple of clues that the mobile kitchen parked every Thursday at lunchtime on Payne Avenue on St. Paul’s East Side this summer isn’t just another food truck.

First of all, the food — hot calzones — is free. And the person who drives the truck is a young woman in a clerical collar who likes to say, “Peace be with you.”

Her name is Margaret Kelly, a 33-year-old preacher’s kid, ex-French chef and former mental health case manager. She’s now a pastor, and the food truck is her church, the St. Paul Pioneer Press (http://bit.ly/1neRc2t ) reported.

It’s not a typical church, but Kelly isn’t your typical Lutheran pastor. She’s a gay woman who started her training at Luther Seminary in St. Paul at a time when the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America didn’t allow gays in committed relationships to serve as clergy members.

“I was fairly confident that change was coming,” Kelly said. She was right. In 2009, the church voted to allow people in committed same-gender relationships to be ministers.

After seminary, Kelly, who also has a master’s degree in social work, worked for about three years for a nonprofit mental health agency. She was married in 2011 in a church wedding. She was ordained in 2012 and legally married to her wife, Eileen, last August, soon after gay marriages became legal in Minnesota. That wedding was conducted by her father, a pastor in Bemidji.

“We made the front page of the Bemidji paper,” Kelly said.

Last year is also when she came up with the idea of a food-truck church. When she was a mental health case manager, Kelly found that people in poverty often lack access to healthy food, reliable transportation, meaningful work and meaningful community.

She thought that one solution could be a church on wheels that drives to where people are, offering free food and prayer to the poor, homeless and near-homeless. The people helping to serve the meals would be from the community that the truck is serving.

“Increased access to food that is cooked and served by those who need the increased access” is how Kelly describes it.

“We don’t simply want it to be a church making handouts,” said Kelly’s boss, the Rev. Paul Erickson, assistant to the bishop for evangelical mission in the ELCA’s St. Paul Area Synod. “We are all ministers to and with each other.”

To support the project, Kelly was able to get grant money from the national church as well as local churches such as St. Andrew’s Lutheran Church in Mahtomedi.

St. Andrew’s also was able to put Kelly in touch with Peter Bolstorff, a Stillwater management consultant, who with his wife, Cary, started an organization called Mobile Action Ministries that owns a food truck serving the needy in the east-metro area.

Mobile Action agreed to loan Kelly its 28-foot, $100,000 vehicle one day a week. Gustavus Adolphus Lutheran Church in St. Paul lets Kelly do food preparation work in its kitchen. Kelly, who once worked as a head cook for the Concordia French Language Village in northern Minnesota and in the meat department at the Wedge co-op grocery in Minneapolis, does the recipe and food planning.

“She is uniquely gifted for this ministry,” Erickson said.

Kelly settled on calzones cooked from scratch as the truck’s specialty. It’s a hand pie, a comfort food common in many cultures and adaptable to healthy fillings.

The church’s name is Shobi’s Table, after an obscure Old Testament figure who offered food to a potential enemy, King David, and his followers.

According to Kelly, it’s a story of “radical hospitality.”

Kelly served her first meal from the truck on April 17. That was Maundy Thursday, the Thursday before Easter that is a commemoration of Christ’s Last Supper.

On a recent Thursday at 11 a.m., the truck was parked at its usual spot on the curb outside the Family Dollar store at 1055 Payne Ave.

Over the next couple hours, a steady stream of people — old ladies, kids on bikes, youths in baggy pants — wandered up to the serving window, frequently asking, “It’s free?” and being told, “It’s free. Come and get it.”

David Schoeppner, 45, came to get a calzone for himself and his girlfriend. He said they live on Social Security checks.

“We barely are surviving,” he said. He said an alternative is a free lunch at a Salvation Army facility down the street, but “the calzones are awesome.”

“Once you know it’s here, you come here,” he said.

“Being homeless, news travels fast,” said Marshall Johnson, 56, who said he comes to the food truck “when I’m really hungry. I don’t abuse it.”

“They’re good people. They don’t have to come out and serve us,” he said.

Just like downtown office workers and bar hoppers, people who don’t have a lot of money appreciate the convenience and fun vibe of a food truck. For some people, going to a food truck feels less intimidating than going inside of a building to get a meal.

“Just the energy is different when people can walk up,” Kelly said. “This is something that pulls up into the neighborhood that feels safe to encounter.”

“This is where everybody’s at,” said Shobi’s Table volunteer Maurice Tribbett. “I come from the same place these people do. I used to be a gang member. I used to be a drug addict. I used to be homeless.”

“We come to them. It’s kind of meeting people where they’re at, spiritually, physically and emotionally,” said Tribbett’s wife, Mary Magill-Tribbett.

You don’t have to be sober to get a meal at the truck. You don’t have stick around for a service.

“I’m not bothered if people just want to eat and run and don’t want any religion,” Kelly said. “It’s a gift from Christ, but it’s not staring you in the face. This is a free lunch because Jesus is free.”

On the Shobi’s Table sign that’s set up on the sidewalk, the words “Lutheran Church” are in fine print.

But after giving out about 140 calzones, Kelly asks the handful of people still gathered on the sidewalk around the truck, “Shall we do some religion?”

“We keep things pretty simple. We read some Scripture and say some prayers,” she said.

“The word of God, yeah,” she said after reading from Romans, Chapter 8.

Kelly said the food truck won’t go into hibernation when winter comes. She hopes to get a heated tent and keep serving. Eventually, she would like to get her own truck and serve more days of the week. She also would like to partner with churches to get vegetables supplied from community gardens.

“A lot of this is breaking new ground in the church,” said Kelly’s boss, Erickson. “We’re grateful for this chance to take on some holy experiments.”

Erickson said the food-truck church eventually could offer curbside counseling and health services, along with traditional worship rites such as baptisms and communion.

“It’s not a traditional church. It doesn’t have a building. It will never have a building. But it will be a church in a traditional sense of the word,” Erickson said.

___

Information from: St. Paul Pioneer Press, http://www.twincities.com

This is an AP Member Exchange shared by the St. Paul Pioneer Press

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Aug 25, 2014
Kim Rivers

Thousands enjoy Food Truck Frenzy on Pier 13 in Hoboken – The Star

Thousands enjoyed craft beer, punch and all manner of foods from 15 venders, as well as a view of the Manhattan skyline at tonight’s Food Truck Frenzy at Pier 13 in Hoboken.

“It’s great,” said Karlene McLeod of Hoboken who was enjoying an exotic meatball dish from the IncrediBalls food truck. “It’s nice to be outdoors and even though the weather looks a little bit shadowy over there, it’s great to be outdoors and have a great selection of affordable food.”

Among the vendors was Polkadot Cup Cake Shop, Cholita Dessert Bar, Oink and Moo BBQ, Amanda’s Bananas frozen desserts, Waffle De Lys, Hunger Construction stuffed baked potatoes, The Cow and the Curd deep fried cheddar cheese and poutine, as well as Pizza Vita with a brick oven on wheels.

Also serving out dishes was The Dark Side of the Moo, which had kangaroo, bison, alligator sausage and wild boar on the menu.

At the end of the pier, craft beer and punch were sold and people sat at tables listening to live music.

Food Truck Frenzy events have been held on the pier throughout the summer and “They have gone really well,” said Rebecca Tarantino who organized the event with her business partner, Darren Conway. “We usually have a few thousand people show up to partake.”

Pier 13 is at the edge of a number of residential highrises. It is privately owned but the public has access from 6 a.m. to 11 p.m. It includes a sailing club, marina and jet ski rentals.

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Aug 25, 2014
Kim Rivers

Street Eats: The food truck craze sweeps across Waco

By Rae Jefferson
Arts Entertainment Editor

The Mix

Located on the corner of University Parks and Franklin, The Mix is a mobile unit of the permanent Mix Cafe located at 803 N. Hewitt Drive.
The truck offers greener and leafier options than traditional food trucks, employee and Baylor alum Alex Parnell said. The eatery’s most popular options include stuffed avocados and chicken salad sandwiches.
“Our truck fits the healthy niche,” he said.
Parnell said one of his favorite features of the truck is its large, screened service window that allows customers to see clearly into the vehicle.
“Our truck is quite transparent,” he said. “People can see what’s going on with the food.”
Although the mix is usually stationed on Franklin for lunch hours, the truck does occasionally travel around town for catering events and concerts, and will move near McLane Stadium on game days.
Follow the mix @themixstreeteats on Instagram for updates.

Dave’s Burger Barn

Dave’s is a quick-service truck located at University Parks and Franklin that offers traditional American cuisine such as burgers, sandwiches and hotdogs. Dave’s Burger Barn is the mobile unit of a restaurant of the same name, located at 600 Patricia.
Restaurant owner Tim Quiroz said his truck’s most popular item is the cheeseburger. The truck’s appeal comes from the quality of food offered to customers, Quiroz said.
“We do everything fresh,” he said.
A Baylor alum, Quiroz said on Mondays and Tuesdays he offers Baylor students a $2 discount on any basket, or a side and drink combo, with a valid student I.D.
Follow Dave’s @DavesBurgerBarn on Twitter to find its location.

Xristo’s Cafe

A fusion of Mediterranean and Lebanese cuisine, Xristo’s Café offers customers a taste unlike the tex-mex or barbecue establishments traditionally found in Waco. The truck is located at University Parks and Franklin, and offers a host of unique menu items including lamb burgers and avocado hummus.
Owner Chris Garmon and wife Stephanie opened the truck March 7. Garmon said the fusion of cultures was the result of his and his wife’s cultural backgrounds.
Customers are drawn to the eatery because Garmon offers foods made from scratch, he said.
“Everything is 100 percent made here,” he said. “It’s fresh. We use angus beef and grass fed lamb.”
Although the truck is generally stationed in the same location, Garmon said customers should like Xristo’s Café on Facebook for notifications of location changes.
Like Xristo’s Café on Facebook for updates.

Club Sandwich

Club Sandwich is located on Austin Avenue in front of Dichotomy Coffee Spirits, and offers a fresh take on Asian and Mexican cuisine. The truck features Korean dishes served in tacos and rice bowls, said owner Young Dae Moon.
A Baylor alum, Moon said inspiration for the truck came during his days as a bear. Moon and his roommates desired a restaurant that offered more authentic Korean cuisine, which they felt the city lacked at the time.
“Whenever I would go home, I’d bring food back with me and eat it,” he said.
Moon said his truck brings a new menu to the food truck scene in Waco.
“It’s something different that Waco hasn’t had before,” he said.
The business opened at the end of this past semester on May 12. Moon said he is excited to see how the return of college students will impact his business, but he also appreciated the opportunity to build a relationship with the Waco community over the summer.
“You can’t survive on Baylor kids alone,” he said. “It gave me a chance to connect to the Waco community.”
Follow Club Sandwich @sandwichd on Twitter and Instagram.

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Aug 25, 2014
Kim Rivers

Exclusive Interview with the Latest Food Truck Team to Exit the Race

The Great Food Truck RaceOn this week’s episode of The Great Food Truck Race, the teams found themselves headed to Tucson, Ariz. Some hoped the change in location from California to the Southwest would be a seamless transition that wouldn’t require much modification in menu or strategy. A Truck Stop challenge of selling a local favorite, and later a Speed Bump that relocated the food trucks to a local festival, both tested the teams’ marketing abilities. But the challenges were easier for some more than for others. One team in particular wasn’t able to get out of the rut they had put themselves into in the previous city. FN Dish has the exclusive exit interview with the latest team cut from the race.

Gourmet Graduates came into Tucson with “an all or nothing” strategy. Having been in the bottom in the first week, they had nothing to lose. Unfortunately, a number of issues in finding good locations to sell their menu of gourmet dorm-room dishes led to low sales, which contributed to their being in the bottom again. Arguments among the team members didn’t help with morale, either. Closing early on the final day of sales was also a contributing factor. In the end Tyler felt that they should have done much better at marketing their brand, which was the goal he gave all the teams on their first day. A full-blown marketing strategy might have made the difference. Ultimately $184 separated them from Middle Feast. Gourmet Graduates left the race without their truck, with only their dreams in tow.

You guys were in the bottom three in week one. What was your goal going into the second week of competition to break out of the bottom?
Gourmet Graduates: Our goal going into the second week was to find and correct our mistakes that kept us from being No. 1. We really wanted to focus on securing a location with heavier foot traffic.

This time Tyler challenged the food truck teams to come up with a marketing plan. How did your team take on the challenge?
GG: We used our marketing tools very efficiently and we were able to take customers from other trucks that were still not open, giving us the advantage on neighboring competition.

How easy or difficult was it incorporating Sonoran hot dogs into your menu as part of Tyler’s Truck Stop challenge?
GG: Incorporating the Sonoran hot dog in our menu was a win for us, because it gave us the opportunity to showcase our ability to adjust and combine flavors/textures that would make our dog stand out from the pack.

Your team presented a really good jingle at the Folk Music Festival. Did you see your sales improve afterward?
GG: Thanks to our high energy and explosive personalities, we were able to create a jingle that people enjoyed, which led to more customers stopping by the truck, not just for good food, but entertainment as well.

Why did you guys decide to close early on day two instead of staying open later?
GG: There were numerous reasons why we decided to close early. The foot traffic had decreased significantly, our propane tank was running on fumes, our top competitors had closed their doors and, most importantly, we were confident in our overall sales in Arizona.

How would you describe your team’s relationship? There was a moment between Keese and Roberto where you two almost lost it.
GG: With both of us being one of four siblings, we are used to bumping heads with those who have similar personalities to one another. But at the end of the day, when you have three passionate, young entrepreneurs, all with the common goal of being successful, there’s no doubt about it that there will be some differences.

What was the biggest obstacle in operating a food truck business for the first time?
GG: Aside from trying to find parking for a 14-foot food truck, getting used to the limited space and appliances were obstacles we had to adjust to immediately if we wanted to make it out of the Venice Beach brawl alive.

As recent culinary school graduates, what’s next for you guys? Is operating a food truck still in your future, or maybe something else?
GG: Being able to operate a food truck for the first time and successfully spread our brand was an awesome experience, without a doubt. However, it opened our eyes to the unlimited possibilities. In a perfect world, the Gourmet Graduates are looking to spread our cuisine on a larger scale by reaching out to fans/foodies on a national televised scale. In other words, we are heading to Hollywood.

What advice would you give the remaining teams, and which one are you rooting for?
GG: Don’t make the same mistakes that we did. “If it’s not broke, then don’t fix it.” Really focus on building your brand; it’s the foundation of your business. Lastly, work together and trust your teammates to execute on a larger scale. We are rooting for our friends Beach Cruiser. They represent a group of young, hip and goal-oriented individuals, just like us. Best of luck, guys! Kick some butt!

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Aug 25, 2014
Kim Rivers

‘Dispatch’ food editor chats up food-truck chefs, owners

Dispatch Food Editor Lisa Abraham will be at Columbus Commons from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on
Sept. 4, conducting public interviews of food-truck chefs and owners about their street fare.

The event will take place during the weekly Food Truck Food Court sponsored by the Columbus
Downtown Development Corporation.

Audience members will have the opportunity to ask chefs questions about their cuisine.

The event is free and open to the public.

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Aug 25, 2014
Tim Lester

Cycling race, food festival, street closures will slow Denver traffic

Heading downtown Sunday? Take public transit!

With the USA Pro Challenge cycling race rolling into town, a food festival on the 16th Street Mall, and the Colorado Rockies ending their three-game series against the Marlins, there will be street closures throughout the day, and parking will be more difficult than usual.

The Rockies game is scheduled for a 2:10 p.m. start, which is close to the time cyclists are expected to be rolling into Denver along Speer Boulevard.

The 16th Street Food Festival will be on the mall until 7 p.m.

It is the last leg of the race, with cyclists riding down Highway 93 from Boulder to end at Civic Center Park.

Most closures in Denver will be from 2 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

Between Sherman and Steele streets, 17th Avenue will be closed sometime between 2 p.m. and 3 p.m. “It all depends on when the riders get in,” Bob Wilson, Colorado Department of Transportation spokesman said.

Interstate 25 off-ramps at Speer Boulevard will close at about 2:30 p.m., and so will Colfax Avenue from Glenarm Place to Sherman Street.

No parking is allowed along the route starting at 6 a.m. Sunday, and by 12:30 p.m. illegally parked vehicles had already been towed.

“Once they get outside Boulder, it’s a rolling closure, anytime you get behind the cyclists it will be slow going,” Wilson said.

RTD is encouraging people to take the bus and light rail.

Tom McGhee: 303-954-1671, tmcghee@denverpost.com or twitter.com/dpmcghee

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