Browsing articles tagged with " Food Trucks"
May 17, 2014
Tim Lester

Urban foraging book gives new meaning to ‘street food’

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Ava Chin is after feast of mind.

Chin’s upcoming memoir “Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love and the Perfect Meal” talks about how she started her serious foraging habit to take her attention off a hard breakup, channelling her energy into learning about plants and how to find wild edible weeds in the most unlikely places.

Chin grew up in Queens, where her first foraging discovery as a young child was field garlic, which reminded her of the scallions and the Chinese chives that her grandfather used to cook with.

“My mother wouldn’t want me to eat it but I would always eat it,” she said.

She began her Brooklyn gathering in Clinton Hill and Park Slope. At first, though, she didn’t think of the area as a place where nature thrived.

“I was a little nervous when I first started out, but as I started forging I realized there were actually plenty of wild edibles to find,” Chin said.

She soon started writing about her plant-seeking adventures for a local section of the New York Times focused on Fort Greene, Clinton Hill, and Prospect Park and, after a year of that, Chin expanded her range into a citywide column called “Urban Forager.”

If she had to pick one place in Brooklyn to treat as a wild supermarket, Chin said she would have to go with Prospect Park.

“There are so many great areas that are a little more wooded and secluded,” she said.

Brooklyn’s backyard offers a forager an escape from the urban pollution afflicting much of the borough, according to Chin, with many areas that are more elevated and further away from the toxin-belching machines that dominate the city.

“There aren’t a lot of cars that necessarily go through there, and there are certain hours of the day that cars don’t drive through the park,” said Chin. “Your chances of finding more pristine wild edibles are grander.”

Prospect Park has some of the city’s best wild edibles, such as mulberries, mushrooms and day lilies, Chin said. The untrained eye passes over them, but these leafy delicacies flourish throughout the park’s grounds, from just off of the jogging paths to the un-landscaped edges of ponds, she said.

Along the borough’s sidewalks, Chin practices and teaches what she calls “guerrilla foraging” or “street foraging” — trawling tree planters and cracks in the pavement for natural items to nosh.

On these jaunts, Chin explains she isn’t actually collecting things to eat, but rather is inspecting what snacks are growing from block to block.

“It’s to kind of sharpen my foraging skills,” she said.

Chin shows others how to play these hunger games so that they might hone their edible-spotting skills for use in less grimy climes.

“If they find themselves in an area that’s a little bit more rural or a little further away from pollution they’ll already be trained to see it,” said Chin.

Chin’s memoir comes out this month.

She will be read from her new book at the Central Library on May 18.

“Eating Wildly: Foraging for Life, Love and the Perfect Meal” talk at the Central Library [10 Grand Army Plaza between Flatbush Ave. and Eastern Pkwy in Park Slope, (718) 230–2100, www.bklynlibrary.org]. May 18 at 1:30pm. Free.

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May 17, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Feast rolls into Harrisburg with free parking – The Patriot

Organizers of the Harrisburg Food Truck Feast want to make sure it’s known parking at the event is free.

The feast will take place 5-9 p.m. today (May 16) at 1601 N. Third St. in midtown Harrisburg with about eight mobile food vendors dishing out chicken, pizza, barbecue, grilled cheese and ice cream.

Organizer Olivia Madrigal, who operates MAD Sandwiches food truck in Harrisburg with her husband, Rodrigo, said comments she had read on Facebook and news sites indicated some people were under the impression they had to pay to park.

The city has implemented new metered parking rates which clock in at $3 per hour and run weekdays and on Saturdays until 7 p.m.

Madrigal said those attending the feast can park for free in the parking lot on North Third Street where the food trucks gather.

The feast is part of the 3rd in the Burg. Entertainment will be provided by BazElle, a DJ duo made up of Bazooka and Elle ruvElle.

Participating trucks this month will include: Up in Smoke, Forno Inferno, MAD Sandwiches, Ice Cream Express, Mad Dash Artisan Grilled Cheese, Grills Goin’ Wild, Baron Von Schwein and The Chicken Truck.

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May 17, 2014
Tim Lester

Taking it to the streets: UK dining scene democratised by street food

Speaking at Caffe Culture, Johnson – founder of the British Street Food Awards and the author of Street Food Revolution – said street food has transformed the traditional culinary career path by offering a low-cost, low risk way for young chefs to start their own business.

“It feels very rock and roll that there is a new generation of chefs that don’t want to work under and angry Frenchmen for 10 years before realising their dream of setting up their own business.” he said, adding:

“All the chefs we have spoken to say if they were starting out now they would do street food because they could get their menu in front of people straight away.”

Johnson said the development of indoor street food sites and markets meant street food vendors at the top of their game can now make a living 12 months a year.

He added that many end up opening a permanent site on the back of their street success, pointing out that some of London’s hottest restaurant openings – including Meat Liquour, Pizza Pilgrims, Yum Bun, Patty and Bun – originated on the streets.

Gorwing demand

Street food is currently generating annual revenue of over £600 and growing 20 per cent every year and Johnson put its success down to the coming of age of Generation Y – who are cost conscious, have strong feelings for the local community and seek out individuality.

“We like the sense of change and something that is evolving and freewheeling and street food fits into that perfectly,” he said.

Street food also taps into demand for local, seasonal and fresh food, as well as desire for theatre and excitement.

“There is an element of theatre in street food that the wider food and drink business could learn from,” said Johnson.

Although some councils remain resistant to street food, Johnson said some are beginning to understand its potential to transform town centres by attracting families and changing the evening focus from booze to food.

“Street food is designed to be inclusive. It is about putting the food and the experience of food right at the middle of what we do,” he said.

Top tips for setting up a street food venture

Here are some top tips for setting up a street food venture from Johnson and a panel of London’s leading street food entrepreneurs.

  • Focus on one thing and do it well
  • Don’t rush in! Start slowly and do your homework, work out exactly how you will operate and where
  • Don’t invest in too much equipment too early
  • Start contacting markets early on – sometimes the hardest thing to find is a market to trade in
  • Don’t get tied down by the van idea, lots of people are pulling pizza ovens around on the back of a car or using a marquee and a trestle table.
  • If you do invest in a vehicle get something sturdy, secure and safe
  • Everything will always cost more than you think – work out your budget and double it
  • Be passionate and be authentic – foodies can smell someone who it is just in it for the money from a mile off

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May 17, 2014
Kim Rivers

Marijuana From a Food Truck?



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  • 1 Ton, Man-Eating Crocodile CAUGHT!1 Ton, Man-Eating Crocodile CAUGHT!
  • Walmart's Space Age New TruckWalmart’s Space Age New Truck
  • Dog Shows Gratitude After RescueDog Shows Gratitude After Rescue
  • Cheetah Pops In On Safari GoersCheetah Pops In On Safari Goers
  • Floating Pile of Trash? Look Closer!Floating Pile of Trash? Look Closer!

The debate whether marijuana is nature’s miracle medicine or a dangerous substance rages on.

Meanwhile, in some states — where the drug is legal for medical and even recreational use — more marijuana edibles are popping up every day to help treat medical conditions. We’re also heading into the high time for recreational use. (More teens try marijuana during the summer than any other season, according to a 2004 study.)

(MORE: 10 Amazing Uses for Marijuana)

The newest edible on the market: MagicalButter’s marijuana food truck. The Seattle-based company makes “botanical extractors” for your kitchen, or appliances that pull the active ingredients out of the plants of your choice (usually cannabis) to create oils and sauces. MagicalButter partnered with another company to create, The Samich, a marijuana-infused food truck.

On the menu, The Samich has pulled pork sandwiches, peanut butter and jelly and grilled cheese with tomato soup, each made with butter, oil or cheese infused with THC, the active ingredient in marijuana.

The truck made headlines when it debuted at Denver’s Cannabis Cup, a sort of marijuana trade show. This debut was mostly a marketing ploy, however. Pot is legal for recreational use in Denver, but it’s also highly regulated by the state and can’t be sold out of a privately owned food truck.

(MORE: 15 Shocking Facts You Don’t Know About Weed)

“In Seattle, we have caregivers,” MagicalButter CEO Garyn Angel told weather.com. “So we can actually have our caregivers give it to their patients, which is how we’re going to do it to begin with.” The truck has only been around since April, so they’re still ironing things out with state and city regulators.

Angel also wants to conduct “dispensary tours,” where the food truck’s chefs “teach the patients at dispensaries how to cook incredible meals with cannabis to treat their ailments.” (Now, the company posts THC-infused recipes on its website.)

“[The food truck] gives a good platform to educate people about how to eat with cannabis, finding out what works, what might not work,” Angel told NPR’s The Salt. “It’s a non-threatening way for people to discover if it helps them at all.”

MORE ON WEATHER.COM: Marijuana and More Healing Plants from Around the World

1 / 22

Pacific yew (West Coast of North America): The active ingredient in yew bark fights cancer by stopping tumors from forming. (New York Botanical Garden)


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May 17, 2014
Kim Rivers

Marijuana From a Food Truck?



Overlay

  • A Food Truck For Pot!A Food Truck For Pot!
  • A Texas Volcano A Texas Volcano
  • WWII Mystery SolvedWWII Mystery Solved
  • 1 Ton, Man-Eating Crocodile CAUGHT!1 Ton, Man-Eating Crocodile CAUGHT!
  • Walmart's Space Age New TruckWalmart’s Space Age New Truck
  • Dog Shows Gratitude After RescueDog Shows Gratitude After Rescue
  • Cheetah Pops In On Safari GoersCheetah Pops In On Safari Goers
  • Floating Pile of Trash? Look Closer!Floating Pile of Trash? Look Closer!

The debate whether marijuana is nature’s miracle medicine or a dangerous substance rages on.

Meanwhile, in some states — where the drug is legal for medical and even recreational use — more marijuana edibles are popping up every day to help treat medical conditions. We’re also heading into the high time for recreational use. (More teens try marijuana during the summer than any other season, according to a 2004 study.)

(MORE: 10 Amazing Uses for Marijuana)

The newest edible on the market: MagicalButter’s marijuana food truck. The Seattle-based company makes “botanical extractors” for your kitchen, or appliances that pull the active ingredients out of the plants of your choice (usually cannabis) to create oils and sauces. MagicalButter partnered with another company to create, The Samich, a marijuana-infused food truck.

On the menu, The Samich has pulled pork sandwiches, peanut butter and jelly and grilled cheese with tomato soup, each made with butter, oil or cheese infused with THC, the active ingredient in marijuana.

The truck made headlines when it debuted at Denver’s Cannabis Cup, a sort of marijuana trade show. This debut was mostly a marketing ploy, however. Pot is legal for recreational use in Denver, but it’s also highly regulated by the state and can’t be sold out of a privately owned food truck.

(MORE: 15 Shocking Facts You Don’t Know About Weed)

“In Seattle, we have caregivers,” MagicalButter CEO Garyn Angel told weather.com. “So we can actually have our caregivers give it to their patients, which is how we’re going to do it to begin with.” The truck has only been around since April, so they’re still ironing things out with state and city regulators.

Angel also wants to conduct “dispensary tours,” where the food truck’s chefs “teach the patients at dispensaries how to cook incredible meals with cannabis to treat their ailments.” (Now, the company posts THC-infused recipes on its website.)

“[The food truck] gives a good platform to educate people about how to eat with cannabis, finding out what works, what might not work,” Angel told NPR’s The Salt. “It’s a non-threatening way for people to discover if it helps them at all.”

MORE ON WEATHER.COM: Marijuana and More Healing Plants from Around the World

1 / 22

Pacific yew (West Coast of North America): The active ingredient in yew bark fights cancer by stopping tumors from forming. (New York Botanical Garden)


Recommended Reading

May 17, 2014
Tim Lester

Alley Bar Lurking in Culver; LA Street Food Fest June 28

Screen%20Shot%202014-05-14%20at%204.37.36%20PM.jpgCULVER CITY— Alley, a tucked away little speakeasy in Culver City along Washington Blvd behind Fin is now serving from Wednesday to Saturday, reports UrbanDaddy. The menu boasts old Hollywood-inspired drinks like the Betty Boop, Audrey Hepburn (Aperol and Champagne with cucumber), and the Cagney, a soft-of wine Old Fashioned. [UD]

PASADENA— The annual LA Street Food Fest hits the Rose Bowl again this year on June 28. Tickets run $55, with the even running from 4 to 10 p.m. [ELA]

STUDIO CITY— Warren’s Blackboard is launching brunch on May 17, with classics like pecan sticky buns, short rib hash, and roasted lamb sammies. [EaterWire]
[Photo: UrbanDaddy]

Recommended Reading

May 17, 2014
Tim Lester

Alley Bar Lurking in Culver; LA Street Food Fest June 28

Screen%20Shot%202014-05-14%20at%204.37.36%20PM.jpgCULVER CITY— Alley, a tucked away little speakeasy in Culver City along Washington Blvd behind Fin is now serving from Wednesday to Saturday, reports UrbanDaddy. The menu boasts old Hollywood-inspired drinks like the Betty Boop, Audrey Hepburn (Aperol and Champagne with cucumber), and the Cagney, a soft-of wine Old Fashioned. [UD]

PASADENA— The annual LA Street Food Fest hits the Rose Bowl again this year on June 28. Tickets run $55, with the even running from 4 to 10 p.m. [ELA]

STUDIO CITY— Warren’s Blackboard is launching brunch on May 17, with classics like pecan sticky buns, short rib hash, and roasted lamb sammies. [EaterWire]
[Photo: UrbanDaddy]

Recommended Reading

May 17, 2014
Jim Benson

The Madison food cart forecast for spring 2014

After the winter of the polar vortex, it’s been the spring of the lingering winter. Opening day for food carts, April 15, dawned with snow on the ground. Construction, somewhat delayed, will soon displace carts on Library Mall (watch this space for news as it develops). Some southeast-area vendors are in their usual spots, like Saigon Sandwich at North Charter and West Johnson. Others have decamped to the Square, and some are venturing to a weekly roster of suburban locales.

Newcomer Melted, stationed on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, was drawing lines for its over-the-top grilled cheese sandwiches. The “Glazed Doughnut,” for example, is a Greenbush doughnut, split and filled with brie, raspberry jam and applewood smoked bacon, and grilled. It was undeniably tasty, but also greasy — well, obviously, but after half the sandwich, not in a good way. Other Melted treats include sandwiches based on the hot dog, the jalapeño popper and the caprese (tomato and pesto), and all come with delightful small cups of tomato soup, for dipping.

Fried and Fabulous has a new sandwich and salad menu at East Main and South Pinckney, saving its roster of deep-fried Oreos, etc., for its late-night and farmers’ market appearances. What is fried now? Chicken nuggets, shrimp, cheese curds, mushrooms and tofu. These can be ordered solo, with dipping sauces; atop a salad, where the sauces become dressings; or stuffed in a bun.

Salads feature romaine and surprisingly flavorful grape tomatoes. The best of the toppings is the most unlikely: the tofu, fried to order. It’s crispy on the outside, dusted with a light seasoning; ethereal within. The salad comes in a large cardboard soup container, an arrangement that might charitably be described as “clumsy.” I liked the chili lime vinaigrette, but even as much as I enjoyed the tofu, this salad-and-fried combo is not likely to stack up against nearby salad/wrap juggernaut Good Food. Why not include some fried desserts? There is, after all, no dessert cart on the Square.

Slide, now with two carts, is parking one of them on the Square (near Walgreens). Its “Buff Chick” is a lovable buffalo chicken slider. The “Beets the Meat” is a veggie, gluten-free slider that can make you feel virtuous enough to order a side of Slide’s excellent house-made potato chips, which, frankly, you should strongly consider ordering whether you are feeling virtuous or not. (Slide also has a new brick-and-mortar presence inside the Cenex station in Cottage Grove, at 207 W. Cottage Grove Rd.)

Happily, Bubbles’ Doubles is now at Wisconsin Avenue and East Mifflin Street most weekdays. An addition to the southeast campus carts last fall, Bubbles’ Trinidad and Tobago fare is a welcome changeup downtown. The menu is simple: There are doubles, which consist of curried chickpeas topped with a vinegary, spicy cucumber relish tumbled into a fried East Indian flatbread; and either vegetable or chicken roti. These are rich curries wrapped in proprietor Morris Reid’s homemade Trinidad and Tobago-style rotis, a super thin, flaky wrap that includes a layer of ground yellow split peas, cumin, garlic and pepper. The chicken roti, currently one of my favorite eats anywhere in the city, is the sort of hefty lunch I always vow to eat half of and save the rest for tomorrow, which works out well if “tomorrow” can be interpreted as “2 p.m.” I always ask for the hot sauce.

Also on the East Mifflin block now are Blowin’ Smoke BBQ, Teriyaki Samurai and King of Falafel. I’d get my falafel from Banzo (now in front of Anchor Bank), but at King of Falafel, tahini lovers can find an under-the-radar hit, and a rock-bottom bargain, with the happily messy “veggie sandwich,” just $4. Melty chunks of eggplant (the menu says it’s fried, though I would have guessed roasted) are paired with french fries, lettuce, tomato, dill pickle and raw onions, doused with tahini sauce and rolled in a large, flattish pita. The pita was a little dry, but the fries provide a wonderfully salty counterpoint to the mellow eggplant and the earthy tahini; the dill pickle perks up the whole assemblage. (Note: The menu does not mention the onions — beware.)

At lunchtime on weekdays, a group of carts will gather at spots around the city. Mondays and Fridays it’s the Dairy Drive meetup (actually at 2702 Agriculture Dr. in front of Madison Media Institute), Tuesdays near American Parkway (last week, in front of Herzing University at 5218 East Terrace Dr.), Wednesdays at University Research Park on the west side, and Thursdays in front of the far-west-side Edgewood College branch at 1255 Deming Way.

Loosely banded together as “Let’s Eat Out Madison,” these carts are also meeting weeknights from 5 to 7 or 7:30 p.m. at a growing number of locales around the city. Mondays, they’ll be at Wheeler Road (behind Gompers school) and a second crew at Winnequah Park in Monona; Tuesday it’s Midvale at Midvale Elementary and also at Maple Bluff beach; Wednesday it’s the far southwest side at Country Grove Park and the far east side at Sharpsburg Drive at North Star Drive, in Grandview Commons; and Thursday it’s Circle Park off Atwood Avenue and in Middleton Hills at High Road and Century Avenue.

City vending coordinator Warren Hansen reports that La Empanada, Taquitos Marimar and Ladonia Café will be vending at Epic Systems in Verona.

Last Friday on Dairy Drive, Slide, Taqueria Sabor Queretano, Porktropolis and a market stand from Ruegsegger Farms were lined up. Porktropolis, a trailer from the Sun Prairie barbecue restaurant of the same name, serves a hefty pulled pork, pork brisket or beef brisket sandwich (or a combo brisket); additional sandwiches with cheese and kraut atop; a side (creamy coleslaw, beans, or mac ‘n’ cheese), as well as a choice of six house-made barbecue sauces. The sweet “Scorched Aronia” sauce has actual aronia berries in it.

The forecast is for a great summer.


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May 16, 2014
Kim Rivers

There’s a Food Truck That Hawks Legal Cannabis-Laced Edibles

“…safer, saner, regularized products.”

No, no, no. It is much better to have face eating bath salt
zombies and Bubba cooking up meth in his trailer. Otherwise how can
you justify a Judge Dredd system for keeping the proles in line?
Drug warriors truly are evil people.

An acquaintance of mine was in the drug scene back before the
war on drugs got cranked up. She said it was cool, lots of nice
people and relatively safe drugs. She got out when the WOD got
started because she said “it turned violent and ugly, real
fast”.

Thanks SoCons.

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