Browsing articles tagged with " hot dogs"
Sep 28, 2013
Kim Rivers

Vote for your favorite food truck now! Trucktoberfest rolls into Monmouth Park … – The Star-Ledger

Have a favorite food truck? It’s time to vote for it now, as Trucktoberfest gets ready to rock at Monmouth Park today.

Your vote is important – it will count toward the prestigious People’s Choice award that will be awarded at the end of judging tomorrow.

Online voting closes at 3 p.m. today.

Vote here

Trucktoberfest, the fall edition of the state’s premier food truck event, will offer the usual delicious, dizzying array of four-wheel fare.

Morris Grilled Cheese and Bacon on Wheels will be back to defend their judges’ and peoples’ choice awards from the Memorial Day weekend event, and such popular trucks as Aroy-D, Cupcake Carnivale, Empanada Guy, French Quarter and Red Hook Lobster will offer high-end eats and compete for top honors.

Other participating trucks include Ahh! La Cart; Amanda Bananas; Dark Side of the Moo; El Lechon de Negron; Fork in the Road; Four Boys; Freezy Freeze; Hibachi Heaven; Jersey Johnny’s Grill; Kona Ice; Max’s Hot Dogs; The Outslider; Pizza Vita; the Surf Turf truck; Tony’s Italian Sausage, and Waffle de Lys.

There will be a German beer garden, and an oompah band will provide entertainment. All patrons wearing lederhosen receive free grandstand admission.

And the Munchmobile and its driver/reporter will be on hand; it’s never too early to drop off those applications for a ride on the Big Dog next summer!

Trucktoberfest will be held from 11:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. Parking is $4; grandstand admission is $3. Children 12 and under are free.

Monmouth Park is located on Oceanport Avenue in Oceanport, just off Exit 105 of the Parkway. For more information, call (732) 222-5100 or visit monmouthpark.com.

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Sep 27, 2013
Kim Rivers

Guess who has rolled out a food truck?

Belly-up to the FS Taste Truck, the Four Seasons Hotels and Resorts’ new food truck, and you can munch on a sea bass and avocado panini, house-made gnocchetti, chicken schnitzel, gluten-free banana bread, a crab Louis roll, or fried green tomatoes, depending on the location.

The Four Seasons, a luxury resort chain known for its deep-pocketed clientele who appreciate the good life, joins the food truck revolution — at least for two months — as its mobile kitchen travels 1,000 miles to serve eight Four Seasons’ properties.

ARCHIVES: Food truck fad comes to fine hotels hawking restaurant fare

The journey began last week when the FS Taste Truck pulled into the Four Seasons’ Palo Alto resort. The mobile eatery parks in San Francisco until Sept. 29, and then continues on in California to Santa Barbara (Sept.30–Oct. 6), Beverly Hills (Oct.7–Oct. 13), Los Angeles (Oct. 14-Oct. 20), and Westlake Village (Oct. 21-Oct.27), followed by Scottsdale, Ariz., (Oct. 28-Nov. 3) and Santa Fe, N.M. (Nov. 4-Nov. 10).

Why a food truck? “Food trucks are a big trend and they are fun,” says the Four Seasons’ Guy Rigby, vice president of food and beverage for the Americas. “We [the Four Seasons] are doing fun, relevant restaurants. These are places you and I would want to go to dinner rather than a formal restaurant you’d take your grandmother to.”

The paper plate cuisine with its creative twists fits the message the Four Seasons seeks to convey about its restaurants and also targets the younger clientele that the Four Seasons covets. In many cities curbside quick bites have morphed from over boiled hot dogs and white bread ham sandwiches to imaginative, often ethnic fare, that’s still affordable.

At the Four Seasons Palo Alto, guests can try bombolini, an Italian-style donut that has salty caramel sauce. At the Beverly Wilshire, a Four Seasons Hotel, guests can judge a chef showdown, voting for the best anticuchos, a popular South American street food consisting of small pieces of grilled meat. At the Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado Santa Fe, guests will be able to order the chile pepper dish that won a guest-decided cook-off between the chef at that property and the chef at the Four Seasons Resort Scottsdale at Troon North, Ariz.

Prices for the food truck fare range from $1 to $13 and a portion of the proceeds will be donated to Chefs to End Hunger, a charity that distributes excess, already cooked food to soup kitchens and shelters. To follow the food truck, check out Taste.

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Sep 26, 2013
Jim Benson

Hampton couple opens the new Lucy’s Smokin’ BBQ food cart

A pert red and white food cart that looks like a tiny house has been popping up around town, and its operators are offering new alternatives for a quick meal.

Mickey and Lucy Joyner opened Lucy’s Smokin’ BBQ about a month ago, and are serving meals from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. every day except Sunday. They are located in a parking lot at 202 W. Mercury Blvd. Monday through Friday, and for the fall on Saturdays at Gosnold’s Hope Park for youth football.

“We enjoy doing this,” Lucy said. “We love the customers. It’s nice to see the familiar faces come in and out all the time, and I like to hear the feedback.”

Lucy’s serves homemade pulled pork barbecue, Nathan’s hot dogs and side dishes through the early part of the week, adding homemade ribs on Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Prices are reasonable, with a barbecue sandwich going for $4.25 and barbecue plate for $6.95.

Mickey smokes his own meat and makes his own sauce.

The Hampton couple has built every aspect of the business themselves, from outfitting the food cart to a homemade wooden table and benches alongside for anybody who wants to sit down and eat. It’s the culmination of four years of talking and planning, and was prodded along by Lucy getting laid off from her job in April.

They’ve had quite a bit of business, from people stopping just to look at the cart to those trotting over from nearby businesses to grab lunch.

“What’s really helping us a lot is word of mouth right now,” Mickey said. “We’re getting a lot of repeat business, that’s really good. People know they can’t get this particular barbecue anywhere else.”

He has worked in the restaurant and meat management businesses, and said he learned to cook by being a bachelor for many years and watching his mother in the kitchen.

“All I want to do is sell some barbecue,” Mickey said. “I don’t want to have to worry about entertainment or any kind of beer or liquor. I enjoy doing this.”

Lucy added that the business was Mickey’s dream, though he says she is the face of the business out front with customers.

“He loves to smoke barbecue, make sauce, be creative,” she said.

Williams can be reached by phone at 757-247-4644.

Lucy’s Smokin’ BBQ

Lucy’s Smokin’ BBQ cart is located at 202 W. Mercury Blvd., Hampton, Monday through Friday and is open 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturdays during the fall the cart will be at Gosnold’s Hope Park, 908 E. Little Back River Road, Hampton, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. For information or details on catering, call 775-1111.

More online

To see a video about Lucy’s Smokin’ BBQ, go to dailypress.com.

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Sep 25, 2013
Kim Rivers

Best food truck in Jersey? Vote for your favorite! And don’t miss … – The Star-Ledger

The Jersey Shore Food Truck Wars returns to Monmouth Park this Saturday!

Trucktoberfest, the fall edition of the state’s premier food truck event, rolls into Monmouth Park with the usual delicious, dizzying array of four-wheel fare.

Morris Grilled Cheese and Bacon on Wheels will be back to defend their judges’ and peoples’ choice awards from the Memorial Day weekend event, and such popular trucks as Aroy-D, Cupcake Carnivale, Empanada Guy, French Quarter and Red Hook Lobster will offer high-end eats and compete for top honors.

Vote for your favorite food truck below; you can even select a write-in candidate!

Other participating trucks include Ahh! La Cart; Amanda Bananas; Dark Side of the Moo; El Lechon de Negron; Fork in the Road; Four Boys; Freezy Freeze; Hibachi Heaven; Jersey Johnny’s Grill; Kona Ice; Max’s Hot Dogs; The Outslider; Pizza Vita; the Surf Turf truck; Tony’s Italian Sausage, and Waffle de Lys.

There will be a German beer garden, and an oompah band will provide entertainment. All patrons wearing lederhosen receive free grandstand admission.

And the Munchmobile and its driver/reporter will be on hand; it’s never too early to drop off those applications for a ride on the Big Dog next summer!

Trucktoberfest will be held from noon to 5 p.m. Parking is $4; grandstand admission is $3. Children 12 and under are free.

Monmouth Park is located on Oceanport Avenue in Oceanport, just off Exit 105 of the Parkway. For more information, call (732) 222-5100 or visit monmouthpark.com.

What’s your favorite Jersey food truck?

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Sep 21, 2013
Tim Lester

New regulations could usher in a golden era of street vending



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The final vending regulations were published today in the D.C. Register, a quiet culmination to a vociferous battle over street food that stretched back years and required countless hours to (sort of) settle disputes between bricks-and-mortar restaurants and their mobile counterparts. Some of the regulations will officially go into effect on Tuesday, Oct. 1.

The new vending regulations will bring more variety to popular squares such as Farragut, where the same trucks often vend. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)

The new vending regulations will bring more variety to popular squares such as Farragut, where the same trucks often vend. (Tim Carman/The Washington Post)

While there are still questions about how the new regs will be implemented — prime among them is how the lottery for the mobile roadway vending zones will work — there are also some changes that you can expect to see, both on the streets and behind the scenes. Among them:

• Starting Nov. 1, food truck owners will take part in a monthly lottery to secure a special multi-hour permit to a prime downtown location, officially ending the low-grade warfare that occurred each weekday for spots near, for example, Farragut Square. The District is testing its so-called mobile roadway vending zones at eight popular locations around the city, including Farragut and Metro Center, hoping to fine-tune the system before rolling out more MRVs.

• Because of the MRVs, food truck operators will no longer be forced to rise before dawn, prep their food and rush down to Farragut Square to take over a parking spot previously held for them by a placeholder vehicle. This should be good for consumer choice. For too long, the same trucks — those better at gaming the system, not better at producing a quality lunch — have controlled the lunch options at Farragut. The mobile roadway vending zones will bring more variety to some of these popular public feeding troughs.

• The food available from sidewalk vendors (remember those?) will venture beyond the half-smokes, hot dogs, chips and candy currently hawked on public walkways. The regs allow the District to start permitting new sidewalk locations, meaning you should begin to see lunch (and merchandise) carts with more ambition. Expect more international foods to start appearing on our sidewalks.

• Along the same lines, mobile vending will expand beyond the rolling kitchens that now roam the streets. Look for trucks that offer other services. Need a haircut? You might be able to amble to the curb and get a trim. A shoe shine? Same thing. How about a new blouse for that surprise dinner invitation? Go to the streets!

• The new regs will allow food trucks to continue to flourish and grow. Che Ruddell-Tabisola, political director for the freshly renamed District Maryland Virginia Food Truck Association, says that 14 trucks have already evolved into permanent or pop-up businesses. The rules will make it possible for others to do the same. How so? Because the D.C. Council eased restrictions placed on trucks in earlier draft regulations, the vendors will be mostly free to roam, even if they don’t win a lottery space at an MRV location. “Because it preserves that central tenet” — mobility — “the industry will continue to thrive,” Ruddell-Tabisola says.

• At the same time, the MRVs will likely force trucks with mid-grade fare to either improve their food or find a new line of work. These vendors will no longer be able to monopolize popular public spaces just by being the first to park on, say, Farragut Square; such tactics, no doubt, artificially inflated their sales. They will need to attract customers who aren’t willing to purchase mediocre food just because it’s close by. And just as important: Quality trucks that had lost their taste for fighting over popular lunch spots (and instead developed markets elsewhere for their fare) will start appearing again downtown.

Tim Carman

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Sep 18, 2013
Jim Benson

Marion City Council OKs mobile food vendor for downtown


Posted: Wednesday, September 18, 2013 4:19 pm


Marion City Council OKs mobile food vendor for downtown

Mike Conley

The McDowell News

A new mobile food vendor plans to set up shop in downtown Marion.


On Tuesday, the Marion City Council gave its approval for a request from David Turnbill, owner of David’s Roadside Grill, to operate a food cart at the gazebo park on Main Street. Turnbill already operates a food cart at Horton’s Store on Sugar Hill Road. He wants to move that food cart to a more prominent location in downtown Marion.

Turnbill submitted an application with the city to operate a push cart at that location, which is classified as the C-1 Central Business District. He submitted all of the necessary documents and met the requirements under the city’s mobile food cart rules, according to Planning Director Heather Cotton.

“We’ve had no problems with this operation,” said Cotton. “I hear it’s quite successful.”

Like all restaurants and other businesses that serve food, his food cart will be inspected by the Health Department.

After hearing from Turnbill, City Council unanimously approved his request.

Turnbill said to The McDowell News he will be at the new location on Main Street as soon as he can. He added he hopes to be there by today.

He said he will start off by serving hot dogs but plans to branch out into other foods as well. He has a mobile cart that is 4 feet by 11 feet in size, which will allow him to serve up a variety of different foods.

“I can do anything that anybody can do in a kitchen,” said Turnbill to The McDowell News.

In other business, the Marion City Council:

• Approved the closing of a portion of Old Ida Street and an alley off of West High Street. This action was taken after city officials held a hearing, which drew no comments at all from the public. Old Ida Street is a platted street that only existed on paper and was never built. The site is located between West High Street and Grace Corpening Drive and the adjacent alley is there. Owners Paul Bartlett and his business partner Frank Routh asked for the closing because they plan to develop the site. City officials said other property owners won’t be denied access to their land as a result of this closing.

• Took final action on the sale of .2 of an acre of city property on Blue Ridge Street to Reese Smith and Kenneth Round for $2,500. This is a mostly cleared vacant parcel located next to a house recently purchased by Smith and Round. Council approved the sale after going through the upset bid process.

• Approved a policy about available fund balance. This is the amount of money set aside by local governments in their budgets for unforeseen emergencies and problems.

• Heard an update from Public Works Director Brant Sikes about the work on Crawford Street. Crawford Street remains closed to through traffic because part of the bank slid off where the creek flows underneath. That happened during the heavy rains which fell in the first weekend of May. The street is open on both ends, but is closed at the point where it crosses over the creek due to safety concerns, between Heritage Hills Apartments and Ann Hawkins Drive. Barricades warn motorists they cannot go through there. Sikes said Tuesday that the city now has a contract with Miller Engineering to do the repair work.

• Announced that a living history event will be held at the McDowell House on Monday, Sept. 30. Re-enactors from the Overmountain Victory Trail Association will be there with their military camp. They will present a living history program about the Overmountain Men, who fought the Loyalist forces at the Battle of Kings Mountain. Fourth-grade students from throughout the county will be there.

• Talked about a solar energy project that is being planned for the southern end of Marion. A joint meeting of the City Council, the McDowell County Commissioners, the McDowell Technical Community College board and the McDowell Economic Development Association board is being planned for October. At this meeting, local officials will get more details about this project.

on

Wednesday, September 18, 2013 4:19 pm.

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Sep 17, 2013
Jim Benson

Reducing Emissions, One NYC Street-Vendor Cart At…

By




New York food cart hooks up to the grid. [Photo by Simply Grid]

New York food cart hooks up to the grid. [Photo by Simply Grid]

Enlarge Photo

Almost anything can be run on electricity these days. Add to the list, now, even New York City’s numerous food carts.

In a new pilot program, street vendors are testing out “grid-powered” electrical connections as an alternative to the noisy, polluting generators they typically use to run their carts, Gothamist reports.

The hardware is being supplied by Simply Grid, a company specializing in “on demand” services involving public access to electricity.

It launched similar electric food-cart pilot programs in Atlanta and Austin earlier this year. New York’s program is sponsored by the Mayor’s Office, the city DoT, and local utility Con Edison.

To keep New Yorkers supplied with hot dogs and falafel, Simply Grid installs a pedestal on the street that vendors plug into using the cords that normally attach to their generator.

The pedestals have built-in metering controllers that connect wirelessly to Simply Grid and to the vendor’s smartphone, allowing each vendor to turn on the service with a tap.

“We accept SMS text messages for outlet control too,” notes the company’s Michael Dubrovsky, “so vendors without smartphones can still use the service.”

Simply Grid estimates that switching from generators to grid electricity could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 9 metric tons a year.

It also says its system will save vendors money by eliminating the need to buy fuel for the generators.

One thing is certain: New York streets would be (a little) quieter without constantly running food-cart generators.

With food-cart vendors hooking up to the grid and New York cabbies testing out electric taxis, who knows what will go electric next?

_______________________________________________

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Inaugural ROAM Conference a Huge Success for Food Trucks

PORTLAND, OR - Let a naysayers be warned. The mobile food attention is distant from a breakthrough and is usually going to grow.

roam conference

That was my biggest take divided from a initial ever ROAM Conference this weekend in Portland, Oregon.

We flew in from Chicago late Friday night not meaningful what to expect, though a different fast altered as we took a TriMET sight to a hotel. It was late and it had been a prolonged day, though as we were last where we indispensable to get off a train, we glanced over to see a lady sitting subsequent to me was reading some ROAM literature. we introduced myself and found that  the lady only so happened to be Brad Moore. Brad is a owners of Short Leash Hot Dogs from Phoenix. He was here for ROAM and was looking brazen to a  speakers and networking eventuality a contention was providing.

The eventuality started early, though we would have never famous that a attendees were entrance from literally around a world. The hum being generated was not from people pang from jet lag, though from those who were vehement to plead mobile food and learn from some of a biggest names in a industry.

The throng was damaged adult onto dual apart contention rooms. One for existent food lorry owners and food lorry organizers. The other organisation was for a fuzzy tailed newbies. The people who wanted to know if or how they could enter this illusory attention of culinary entrepreneurs. we was asked and gladly supposed to assuage a contention in a foot stay session.

While a vast infancy of a participants in a foot stay were from Oregon, there were people from as distant divided during Vietnam. The determined mobile food vendors ferociously took records and questioned a speakers who spoke on topics such as:

  • Lizzy Caston: The Business Game Plan - Concept/Brand/Business Plan
  • Rick Humphrey and Scott Ross: The Wheels The Tools – Truck vs. Cart, Rent vs. Buy
  • Stephanie Ganz and Barb Upchurch: It’s all about a Money – Crowd Funding, Assistance Programs Loans
  • Matt Hoffman: Getting Legal – Permits, City Codes, Commissary Kitchens Waste
  • Matt Breslow: Getting Ready – Selecting Vendors, Sourcing, Menu Planning Production
  • Ginnette Wessel: Marketing 101
  • Brian Reed: Avoiding a many common mistakes

In a other room, existent mobile food vendors overwhelmed on topics such as business growth, profitability, heading laws, sustainability and amicable media marketing.

At lunch we all collected together to hear about a state of a attention from a boss and CEO of a SOCALMFVA, Matt Geller. We were treated to lunch from Portland vendors Retrolicious and Bro-Dogs.

There was a lot of information and business cards common during a day, though even as a grave discussions ended, we all installed on buses (did we discuss with internal beer) and headed out to a Rose City Cart Pod for diner. This was my initial outing to Portland and we wasn’t utterly certain what to design from a revisit to my initial PDX transport pod. As we off installed from a bus, we was greeted with a really informed scene.

Just as we have witnessed in cities opposite a country, this food transport pod was full of smiling vendors holding orders from smiling customers. Those that had already been served or were watchful for their orders were articulate with those surrounding them, even if they had only met them while in line. The food and drink were being enjoyed by people and groups and a altogether clarity we would take from being there was one of comfort.

People mostly ask me to report a mobile food industry, we consider my outing to Portland and a ROAM Conference has cemented my opinion as, “Good people portion good food to eager customers. ”

If we missed a possibility to attend, we wish that there is another contention in a nearby destiny for we to check out.

I would like to again appreciate a promoters of a 2013 ROAM Conference for permitting me to take partial in your initial event.

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Sep 14, 2013
Jim Benson

Reducing Emissions, One NYC Street-Vendor Cart At A Time

By




New York food cart hooks up to the grid. [Photo by Simply Grid]

New York food cart hooks up to the grid. [Photo by Simply Grid]

Enlarge Photo

Almost anything can be run on electricity these days. Add to the list, now, even New York City’s numerous food carts.

In a new pilot program, street vendors are testing out “grid-powered” electrical connections as an alternative to the noisy, polluting generators they typically use to run their carts, Gothamist reports.

The hardware is being supplied by Simply Grid, a company specializing in “on demand” services involving public access to electricity.

It launched similar electric food-cart pilot programs in Atlanta and Austin earlier this year. New York’s program is sponsored by the Mayor’s Office, the city DoT, and local utility Con Edison.

To keep New Yorkers supplied with hot dogs and falafel, Simply Grid installs a pedestal on the street that vendors plug into using the cords that normally attach to their generator.

The pedestals have built-in metering controllers that connect wirelessly to Simply Grid and to the vendor’s smartphone, allowing each vendor to turn on the service with a tap.

“We accept SMS text messages for outlet control too,” notes the company’s Michael Dubrovsky, “so vendors without smartphones can still use the service.”

Simply Grid estimates that switching from generators to grid electricity could reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 9 metric tons a year.

It also says its system will save vendors money by eliminating the need to buy fuel for the generators.

One thing is certain: New York streets would be (a little) quieter without constantly running food-cart generators.

With food-cart vendors hooking up to the grid and New York cabbies testing out electric taxis, who knows what will go electric next?

_______________________________________________

Follow GreenCarReports on Facebook, Twitter, and Google+.



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Wiener Schnitzel Fun Facts

The internet is full of fanciful contribution about all from stream events to a story basket weaving. Because of this, during a investigate for a daily content, we event on some equipment of believe that we only did not know. We have motionless when these fun contribution cocktail up, that we would share them with a readers in a new territory patrician “Did You Know?”.

For today’s DYK fun contribution we will demeanour during Wiener Schnitzel.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Facts: Wiener Schnitzel is a really thin, breaded and deep fried Schnitzel from veal. It belongs to a best famous specialties of Viennese cuisine.

  • The nomination “Wiener Schnitzel” initial seemed in a finish of a 19th century, with a initial famous discuss in a cookbook from 1831. In a renouned southern German cookbook by Katharina Prato, it was mentioned as eingebröselte Kalbsschnitze.
  • The Wiener Schnitzel is a inhabitant plate of Austria.
  • September 9th is National Wiener Schnitzel Day.
  • The thought of tenderizing a square of tough beef by pulsation it is clear in a oldest corpse of a story of man. However a Romans left justification of excellence of a skinny cut of beef dredged in breading and boiled in a 1 century BC by Apicus.
  • A renouned movement is done with pork instead of veal, since pig is cheaper than veal (usually about half a price). To equivocate blending adult opposite products, a Austrian and German food committees have motionless that a “Wiener Schnitzel” contingency be done of veal.
  • Wienerschnitzel is an American fast food chain founded in 1961 (as “Der Wienerschnitzel”) that specializes in hot dogs, yet is now expanding to other items. Wienerschnitzel locations are found primarily in California and Texas, yet others are located in Arizona, Colorado, Illinois,Louisiana, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, and Washington state. There is also a store in Guam.

Wiener Schnitzel Facts We Missed

If so, greatfully feel giveaway to let us know in a criticism territory below. We always adore to supplement to these lists. If we can determine that a contribution is only that, a fact, we will give a reader credit in a article.

Reference: Wikipedia: Fun Facts about Wiener Schnitzel.

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