Browsing articles tagged with " hot dogs"

Hot Dog University to invade Southern California in July

hot dog universityCHICAGO, IL - Hot Dog University guides their students by all from transport preference to purchasing and pricing. You will learn how to arrange a many tasty prohibited dog you’ve ever tasted. Normally offering during Vieena Beef’s HQ in Chicago, a PhD (Professor of prohibited Dogs) Mark Reitman will be roving to Southern California to offer these classes.

The instruction gives we a collection we will need to pursue your dreams. After completing the course, you will have a believe we need to step into a smashing universe of operative for yourself. With good food and your extraordinary personality, “how could we go wrong?”

Dates:

  • July 15th – Los Angeles – SOLD OUT
  • July 16th – Los Angeles
  • July 17th – Los Angeles

Hot Dog U Phd

Twitter: @HotDogU_Phd

Mark Reitman, Phd (Professor of Hot Dogs) during Hot Dog University, a nation’s college of encased beef believe during Vienna Beef in Chicago.

http://www.hotdogu.com

Recommended Reading

May 8, 2013
Kim Rivers

NYT Magazine: New York Sucks for Food Truck Owners

2012_11_Wafels3.jpgEver wondered why, with the New York food scene what it is, there’s still so many more dirty water hot dog stands and Good Humor carts and pretzel vendors than there are food trucks? Ever asked if there should be “four Wafels Dinges trucks for every hot-dog cart?” The New York Times Magazine is on it, looking at the “numerous (and sometimes conflicting) regulations” from several different city departments, all of which are enforced “with varying consistency” often at the expense of immigrants or others who have trouble navigating the dizzying array of permits and licenses.

And then there’s this thing called an “authorized commissary,” which sounds like it totally shouldn’t be legal but apparently is:

By city law, every food cart and truck must visit a licensed commissary each day, where a set of mandated cleaning services can be performed. These commissaries also sell and rent carts and sell vendors food, soda, ice cream and propane. Rigie told me that many commissary owners make a bit extra by acting as informal brokers, facilitating the not-quite-legal trade of permits, which, by some estimates, is a $15 million-a-year business. Given their city-mandated stream of business, these commissaries have essentially formed an oligopoly. As a result, they have little incentive to compete aggressively by offering different kinds of food. No wonder we have an oversupply of hot dogs and knishes and nowhere near enough waffles and falafels.

Recommended Reading

To Open a NYC Food Truck is Like Starting Business in Ecuador

taim food lorry nycNEW YORK CITY, NY – Stefan Nafziger seemed infrequently downbeat for a man examination a dozen or so inspired people line adult to buy his falafels. Three years ago, when it seemed as if food trucks competence take over Manhattan, he designed to have a swift of his Taim trucks dispensing Middle Eastern transport via a city. He even got a Wall Street investor. Now, he says, his one lorry hardly justifies a cost.

I was creatively anticipating that Nafziger would assistance me figure out a decidedly New York puzzle. As we was walking by Prospect Park recently, we wanted to find a sustaining break for my son and something for me. The usually options, though, were a same arrange of carts that my father took me to in a ’70s: Good Humor ice cream, overpriced cans of soda and overboiled prohibited dogs sitting in pale water. This seemed ridiculous. In a past few decades, food in New York City has left by a finish transformation, though a street-vendor market, that should be some-more nimble, hardly budges. Shouldn’t there be 4 Wafels Dinges trucks for any hot-dog cart?

David Weber, boss of a New York City Food Truck Association, explained that a ratio is some-more like 25 to 1 a other way. That’s since notwithstanding a fundamental lure of lovable trucks and crafty food options, a business stinks. There are countless (and infrequently conflicting) regulations compulsory by a departments of Health, Sanitation, Transportation and Consumer Affairs. These manners are enforced, with varying consistency, by a New York Police Department. As a result, according to City Councilman Dan Garodnick, it’s scarcely unfit (even if we fill out a right paperwork) to work a lorry though violation some law. Trucks can’t sell food if they’re parked in a metered space . . . or if they’re within 200 feet of a propagandize . . . or within 500 feet of a open marketplace . . . and so on.

Enforcement is erratic. Trucks in Chelsea are frequency bothered, Nafziger said. In Midtown South, where we work and can demonstrate to a unfortunate need for some-more lunch options, a N.Y.P.D. has a dedicated organisation of vendor-busting cops. “One month, we get no tickets,” Thomas DeGeest, a owner of Wafels Dinges, a renouned mobile-food businesses that sells waffles and things, told me. “The subsequent month, we get tickets any day.” DeGeest had dual trucks and 5 carts when he motionless he couldn’t keep investing in a business that was so exposed to overzealous cops or city bureaucracy. Instead, DeGeest reluctantly motionless to open a unchanging aged still restaurant.

Nafziger also knows good a regulatory hassles of a business. After one of his employees spent 8 hours in jail for offered falafel though a license, he particularly follows a order insisting that any mobile-food workman has Health Department certification. The difficulty is that he needs to occupy 4 people, any with his possess license; if one quits, it can take dual months for a new workman to get a correct paperwork. Nafziger pronounced he binds on to his lorry usually since it’s fundamentally a relocating billboard for his two, some-more successful brick-and-mortar restaurants, in Greenwich Village and NoLIta. And still restaurants, by a way, need that usually a singular workman on avocation have a Health Department certification.

Nafziger and DeGeest might have turn experts in a manners and regulations, though many of a city’s vendors are constantly flummoxed. we spent one new morning in a offices of a Street Vendor Project, a worker-advocacy group. As we sat with Sean Basinski, a group’s founder, a tide of vendors came in with pinkish tickets in their hands. One woman, an Ecuadorean newcomer who sells kebabs in Bushwick, Brooklyn, handed Basinski a 6 tickets that she and her father perceived on a singular afternoon. The sum came to $2,850, which, she said, was most some-more than what she creates in a good week. She had a street-vendor’s license, she said, though didn’t know that she also indispensable a apart assent for her cart.

The food-truck business, we realized, is a classical box of official inertia. The city has a right to import a interests of food-market owners (who don’t wish food trucks restraint their windows) and diners (who merit to know that their travel beef is edible, and harmless). But many of a manners ruling plcae were created decades ago. In a ’80s, a city capped a series of carts and trucks during 3,000 (plus 1,000 some-more from Apr to October). Technically, a assent for a food transport or lorry is not transferable, though Andrew Rigie, executive executive of a N.Y.C. Hospitality Alliance, pronounced that vendors frequently compensate assent holders something like $15,000 to $20,000 to franchise their certificates for dual years. Legally, a assent hilt becomes a youth partner in a new business.

Find a whole essay by Adam Davison during The New York Times here

Recommended Reading

May 7, 2013
Jim Benson

The Food-Truck Business Stinks

I was originally hoping that Nafziger would help me figure out a decidedly New York puzzle. As I was walking through Prospect Park recently, I wanted to find a healthful snack for my son and something for me. The only options, though, were the same sort of carts that my dad took me to in the ’70s: Good Humor ice cream, overpriced cans of soda and overboiled hot dogs sitting in cloudy water. This seemed ridiculous. In the past few decades, food in New York City has gone through a complete transformation, but the street-vendor market, which should be more nimble, barely budges. Shouldn’t there be four Wafels Dinges trucks for every hot-dog cart?

David Weber, president of the New York City Food Truck Association, explained that the ratio is more like 25 to 1 the other way. That’s because despite the inherent attractiveness of cute trucks and clever food options, the business stinks. There are numerous (and sometimes conflicting) regulations required by the departments of Health, Sanitation, Transportation and Consumer Affairs. These rules are enforced, with varying consistency, by the New York Police Department. As a result, according to City Councilman Dan Garodnick, it’s nearly impossible (even if you fill out the right paperwork) to operate a truck without breaking some law. Trucks can’t sell food if they’re parked in a metered space . . . or if they’re within 200 feet of a school . . . or within 500 feet of a public market . . . and so on.

Enforcement is erratic. Trucks in Chelsea are rarely bothered, Nafziger said. In Midtown South, where I work and can attest to the desperate need for more lunch options, the N.Y.P.D. has a dedicated team of vendor-busting cops. “One month, we get no tickets,” Thomas DeGeest, the founder of Wafels Dinges, a popular mobile-food businesses that sells waffles and things, told me. “The next month, we get tickets every day.” DeGeest had two trucks and five carts when he decided he couldn’t keep investing in a business that was so vulnerable to overzealous cops or city bureaucracy. Instead, DeGeest reluctantly decided to open a regular old stationary restaurant.

Nafziger also knows well the regulatory hassles of the business. After one of his employees spent eight hours in jail for selling falafel without a license, he strictly follows the rule insisting that every mobile-food employee has Health Department certification. The trouble is that he needs to employ four people, each with his own license; if one quits, it can take two months for a new worker to get the proper paperwork. Nafziger said he holds on to his truck only because it’s basically a moving billboard for his two, more successful brick-and-mortar restaurants, in Greenwich Village and NoLIta. And stationary restaurants, by the way, require that only a single employee on duty have a Health Department certification.

Nafziger and DeGeest may have become experts in the rules and regulations, but many of the city’s vendors are constantly flummoxed. I spent one recent morning in the offices of the Street Vendor Project, a worker-advocacy group. As I sat with Sean Basinski, the group’s founder, a stream of vendors came in with pink tickets in their hands. One woman, an Ecuadorean immigrant who sells kebabs in Bushwick, Brooklyn, handed Basinski the six tickets that she and her husband received on a single afternoon. The total came to $2,850, which, she said, was much more than what she makes in a good week. She had a street-vendor’s license, she said, but didn’t understand that she also needed a separate permit for her cart.

Recommended Reading

May 5, 2013
Terri Judson

Two twists on wine: Hammonton, Atlantic City host wine events

ATLANTIC CITY — On a world-famous boardwalk with the Atlantic Ocean as the backdrop, wine enthusiasts on Saturday plopped down as much as $85 to sample 150 different wines from the around the world as they knoshed on tuna tartar with wasabi and green apple caviar.


Many came from neighboring states after hearing radio advertisements for the first Do AC Boardwalk Wine Promenade. They were dressed better than most people strolling the Boardwalk on the sunny spring day.

Meanwhile, more than 30 miles away, wine enthusiasts assembled on a dusty dirt fairground, spending $16 to sample wines from seven southern New Jersey vintners and dining on hot dogs, cheesesteaks and Italian sausage at the first Hammonton Wine Festival.

Dress was casual, as in jeans and T-shirts, and most of the people came from the immediate vicinity and heard about it by word-of-mouth or social media, such as Facebook.

Wine festivals are big right now, and there is no one way to do them. Saturday’s tale of two wine festivals shows they can be upscale, such as the one sponsored by the Atlantic City Alliance — which even brought in award-winning wine expert and television personality Leslie Sbrocco to host it — or they can be decidedly low-key, such as the one in Hammonton.

They also can have different purposes. The Hammonton Rotary Club sponsored its festival to raise money for its college scholarships and sponsorship of youth sports teams. The Atlantic City Alliance wanted to proclaim to the world that Hurricane Sandy did not damage the Boardwalk and that the city is open for business. All of the city’s casinos were involved.

Atlantic City had 150 wines at seven locations. Hammonton had seven wines at one location. None of that seem to matter much to those drinking the wine.

“The white sangria was amazing. I gave it three stars,” said Jeanette Olson, of Somerdale, Camden County, speaking of the sangria made by DiMatteo Vineyards and Winery of Hammonton.

“I gave it five stars,” chimed in her sister, Cookie Olson, of Pittsgrove Township, Salem County, to which Jeanette explained that she uses a three-star system.

The Olsons had planned to go to the Atlantic City festival, which drew thousands of people, but said they ended up staying closer to home at the Hammonton festival that drew more than 400 people. Instead of drinking French wines, they were tasting some unusual New Jersey vintages, including some made with blueberries and cranberries. A growth of wineries in the Hammonton area, three in town and eight within a 20-minute drive, is fueling enthusiasm for the fermented fruit in this rural farming town.

“We’re getting rid of the stigma about New Jersey wines. We’re holding our own with the wine industry and are starting to be recognized,” said Ollie Tomasello, owner of Plagido’s Winery in Hammonton.

Plagido’s opened in 2007 and is a small operation that produces about 10,000 gallons per year. Tomasello welcomed the festival as a way to get publicity. Customers paid $16 for a wine glass and were able to use it to taste freely at all the tents set up by the vineyards.

“We hope they come to the winery and see us, and buy bottles. This is to get people familiar with New Jersey wines,” Tomasello said.

Nearby, Heidi Bowers, of Shiloh, Cumberland County, talked about working at wine festivals in Cape May County and said Hammonton has what it takes to put one on.

“There are a lot of people here and everybody’s nice. If this one starts to take off, more people will come from different areas,” Bowers said.

Sbrocco was the star of the show in Atlantic City. The host of the PBS series “Check Please!” and a regular on the “Today Show,” Sbrocco opened the festival by using a French sabre to pop the cork off two bottles of champagne. Sabrage, she explained, is a tradition started by French Emperor Napoleon Bonaparte to celebrate victory on the battlefield.

“Keep your fingers crossed. Hopefully it will come off easy and we’ll be ready to drink,” Sbrocco said.

A swipe of the blade sent the cork soaring, and the bubbly flowed. A resident of California, the wine country in the Sonoma Valley, who sports a tattoo of a glass of red wine on her calf, Sbrocco was impressed with the venue and complimentary of the wines being produced on New Jersey’s coastal plain.

“It’s a spectacular setting. I think it’s so scenic, though next year I think we might need a trolley,” Sbrocco said.

The distance between the seven stations was not a problem for Peggy and Chuck Biehl, of Maryland, who heard about the event on the radio and decided to come for the weekend. Chuck Biehl said he was prepared to drink wine and walk all afternoon.

“We’re doing all seven stations today,” Biehl said.

The event also drew Rick and Yvonne Carter, of Brooklyn, N.Y., who went to a wine festival on a pier in Rhode Island and enjoyed the setting. Wine festivals are often held at vineyards, but they liked the idea of wine and the ocean.

“It’s a great combination,” Rick Carter said.

Liza Cartmell, president of the nonprofit Atlantic City Alliance, said the festival helps in multiple ways. It promotes the Do AC slogan coined last year, advertises that the Boardwalk was not damaged by Sandy, and links good food and wine with the city.

“It lets people know we are a great good and wine destination. This is a world-class wine event. It’s not just about gambling. There are shows, restaurants, nightclubs and walking on the beach. We hope to make it an annual spring kick-off,” Cartmell said.

The event also drew wine marketers hoping to attract new business. Alexander Conison was there to make sure the right people tasted his medici eimete concerto lambrusco.

“As a wine marketer, we should be doing more of this. When you think of a wine event, you don’t think of the Atlantic City Boardwalk, but wines can mix with some very incongruous settings,” Conison said.

Contact Richard Degener:

609-463-6711

RDegener@pressofac.com

Recommended Reading

May 4, 2013
Tina George

Have you been to Canada’s best food festivals? Here’s 21 to get you started

Whenever I’m on the road, I sniff out culinary events as if I haven’t eaten in days. But while crowded big festivals are usually fun, I’m also a salivating fan of smaller community happenings where you meet the locals, chat with producers and depart with a jar or two of something weird and wonderful.

Luckily, summertime Canada is crammed with tasty dishes of all sizes.

Pack those pants with the elasticized waist and start your crawl in B.C. On May 11 stop by Vancouver’s B.C. Spot Prawn Festival (spotprawnfestival.com) at Fisherman’s Wharf for a giddy al fresco party of cooking demos and heaping plates of fresh-caught crustaceans.

Or hop to Vancouver Island’s May-long Feast Tofino (feasttofino.com), a showcase of foodie events including dockside tastings. Even better, stick around through June 7 to 9 for Grazing in the Gardens at the Tofino Food Wine Festival (tofinofoodandwinefestival.com), an idyllic rain-forest wandering with artisan nosh, live music and a glass or three.

Sample even more Vancouver Island goodies at Victoria’s four-day Taste Festival (victoriataste.com) in late July: opening night gala on July 25 recommended. Be sure to combine your visit with a trip to the brand new, foodie-focused Victoria Public Market (victoriapublicmarket.com), opening in the old Hudson’s Bay building in June.

Back on the mainland – perhaps after a Canada Day detour to Saturna Island’s annual pagan-esque Lamb Barbecue (saturnalambbarbeque.com) – faceplant into Richmond’s red-hot Asian dining scene at two taste-tripping summer-long night markets (richmondnightmarket.com; summernightmarket.com). You’ll find dozens of stalls hawking everything from pepper-fried squid to taste-bud-popping stinky tofu.

Work off that expanding waistline with a quick jog, then head east. Late-May’s Berkshire Beer hog and ale party at Edmonton’s Yellowhead Brewery (yellowheadbrewery.com) is a worthy pit stop, while July’s gigantic Calgary Stampede (calgarystampede.com) delivers a calorie-hugging midway of carnivorous grub, including deep-fried prairie oysters (bull testicles): I tried them once and that’s all anyone needs to do.

Make a hot dog pit stop at Regina’s grassroots Great Saskatchewan Mustard Festival in mid-September, but first dive into Canada’s foodiest province. In mid-August, Downtown Montreal serves Quebec’s first course with the Omnivore Food Festival (omnivore.com), where culinary hot shots from around the world cook for the gourmet delight of strolling visitors.

Alternatively, cheese fans should sample June’s Festival des Fromages Fins in Victoriaville (festivaldesfromages.qc.ca) where classes, pairings and cheese sculpting teach all you need to know about the pungent world of curds. Return for August’s Festival de la Poutine in Drummondville (festivaldelapoutine.com), coupled with three days of live music.

Toronto’s huge, Greek-themed Taste of the Danforth (tasteofthedanforth.com) street party Aug. 9 to 11 fills bellies every summer, but wider Ontario also delivers intriguing side dishes for those unfurling their appetites beyond the city.

Burlington’s four-day, lakefront Ribfest (canadaslargestribfest.com) serves thousands of esurient meatarians on Labour Day weekend, while the Brantford International Villages Festival (brantfordvillages.ca) celebrates global cultures with cuisines from Poland to the Philippines in early July. If you can’t wait for September’s Niagara Food Festival (niagarafoodfestival.com), consider August’s family-friendly Leamington Tomato Festival (leamingtontomatofestival.com) with its sticky tomato stomping option.

Naturally, Atlantic Canada offers a sprawling buffet of seafood-focused shenanigans. New Brunswick’s delightful Shediac Lobster Festival (shediaclobsterfestival.ca) is a July highlight, while Campbellton’s smaller but perfectly-formed Salmon Festival (salmon-festival.com) includes a parade and plenty of stomach-stuffing partying.

Hopping to PEI, mid-September chefs-up Charlottetown’s International Shellfish Festival (peishellfish.com) – a raucous kitchen party of oyster-shucking and chowder-making contests – while you can eat dessert early at late-July’s week-long St. Peter’s Bay Wild Blueberry Festival. Fuel-up for its giant community dances with homemade blueberry buckle at the local barbecue.

By this stage, your food fest belly may have you mulling a draconian diet. But I’d suggest having another slice of buckle before making any rash decisions.

NEXT WEEK: A reader doesn’t want to be “just another tourist” in Prague. Any ideas? E-mail: concierge@globeandmail.com

Special to The Globe and Mail

Follow John @johnleewriter.

Send John your travel questions at concierge@globeandmail.com.

Recommended Reading

May 4, 2013
Tina George

Come hungry: Canada’s best food festivals to hit this summer

Whenever I’m on the road, I sniff out culinary events as if I haven’t eaten in days. But while crowded big festivals are usually fun, I’m also a salivating fan of smaller community happenings where you meet the locals, chat with producers and depart with a jar or two of something weird and wonderful.

Luckily, summertime Canada is crammed with tasty dishes of all sizes.

Pack those pants with the elasticized waist and start your crawl in B.C. On May 11 stop by Vancouver’s B.C. Spot Prawn Festival (spotprawnfestival.com) at Fisherman’s Wharf for a giddy al fresco party of cooking demos and heaping plates of fresh-caught crustaceans.

Or hop to Vancouver Island’s May-long Feast Tofino (feasttofino.com), a showcase of foodie events including dockside tastings. Even better, stick around through June 7 to 9 for Grazing in the Gardens at the Tofino Food Wine Festival (tofinofoodandwinefestival.com), an idyllic rain-forest wandering with artisan nosh, live music and a glass or three.

Sample even more Vancouver Island goodies at Victoria’s four-day Taste Festival (victoriataste.com) in late July: opening night gala on July 25 recommended. Be sure to combine your visit with a trip to the brand new, foodie-focused Victoria Public Market (victoriapublicmarket.com), opening in the old Hudson’s Bay building in June.

Back on the mainland – perhaps after a Canada Day detour to Saturna Island’s annual pagan-esque Lamb Barbecue (saturnalambbarbeque.com) – faceplant into Richmond’s red-hot Asian dining scene at two taste-tripping summer-long night markets (richmondnightmarket.com; summernightmarket.com). You’ll find dozens of stalls hawking everything from pepper-fried squid to taste-bud-popping stinky tofu.

Work off that expanding waistline with a quick jog, then head east. Late-May’s Berkshire Beer hog and ale party at Edmonton’s Yellowhead Brewery (yellowheadbrewery.com) is a worthy pit stop, while July’s gigantic Calgary Stampede (calgarystampede.com) delivers a calorie-hugging midway of carnivorous grub, including deep-fried prairie oysters (bull testicles): I tried them once and that’s all anyone needs to do.

Make a hot dog pit stop at Regina’s grassroots Great Saskatchewan Mustard Festival in mid-September, but first dive into Canada’s foodiest province. In mid-August, Downtown Montreal serves Quebec’s first course with the Omnivore Food Festival (omnivore.com), where culinary hot shots from around the world cook for the gourmet delight of strolling visitors.

Alternatively, cheese fans should sample June’s Festival des Fromages Fins in Victoriaville (festivaldesfromages.qc.ca) where classes, pairings and cheese sculpting teach all you need to know about the pungent world of curds. Return for August’s Festival de la Poutine in Drummondville (festivaldelapoutine.com), coupled with three days of live music.

Toronto’s huge, Greek-themed Taste of the Danforth (tasteofthedanforth.com) street party Aug. 9 to 11 fills bellies every summer, but wider Ontario also delivers intriguing side dishes for those unfurling their appetites beyond the city.

Burlington’s four-day, lakefront Ribfest (canadaslargestribfest.com) serves thousands of esurient meatarians on Labour Day weekend, while the Brantford International Villages Festival (brantfordvillages.ca) celebrates global cultures with cuisines from Poland to the Philippines in early July. If you can’t wait for September’s Niagara Food Festival (niagarafoodfestival.com), consider August’s family-friendly Leamington Tomato Festival (leamingtontomatofestival.com) with its sticky tomato stomping option.

Naturally, Atlantic Canada offers a sprawling buffet of seafood-focused shenanigans. New Brunswick’s delightful Shediac Lobster Festival (shediaclobsterfestival.ca) is a July highlight, while Campbellton’s smaller but perfectly-formed Salmon Festival (salmon-festival.com) includes a parade and plenty of stomach-stuffing partying.

Hopping to PEI, mid-September chefs-up Charlottetown’s International Shellfish Festival (peishellfish.com) – a raucous kitchen party of oyster-shucking and chowder-making contests – while you can eat dessert early at late-July’s week-long St. Peter’s Bay Wild Blueberry Festival. Fuel-up for its giant community dances with homemade blueberry buckle at the local barbecue.

By this stage, your food fest belly may have you mulling a draconian diet. But I’d suggest having another slice of buckle before making any rash decisions.

NEXT WEEK: A reader doesn’t want to be “just another tourist” in Prague. Any ideas? E-mail: concierge@globeandmail.com

Special to The Globe and Mail

Follow John @johnleewriter.

Send John your travel questions at concierge@globeandmail.com.

Recommended Reading

May 2, 2013
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Friday on Camden’s waterfront – Philly.com

A trio of food trucks will be pulling up to the Camden waterfront every Friday at lunch beginning May 10 and continuing throughout the summer.


Organized by the Cooper’s Ferry Partnership waterfront development corporation, “Food Truck Friday,” as it’s being called, is drawing interest from a variety of gourmet trucks around the region, including the three that will start next week: deli-on-wheels Reuben on Rye, Cupcakes 2 GoGo, and Lil’ Trent’s Treats dessert truck.

The organizers hope the number and variety will grow once these trucks test the logistics and response.

“It’s a good business decision,” says Haddonfield-based Ginny Moles, who notes the difficulty in finding crowds elsewhere in South Jersey, especially in summer. The major difference in Camden, she says, are the throngs of families and field trips visiting the Adventure Aquarium, and the thousands of neighborhood office, law, and medical workers who have few options for food. “I think it’ll be a great opportunity.”

George Bieber, treasurer and membership director of the Philadelphia Mobile Food Association (PMFA), said several of its members were considering inclusion in Food Truck Friday.





“A nice spot like this would be awesome,” says Bieber, who considered signing up his own Sunflower Truck Stop for the summer. “You get a few [trucks] and it becomes like a party.”

That’s exactly the feel Cooper’s Ferry is trying to cultivate. By adding food trucks near Fountain Park, already equipped with colorful chairs, tables, and umbrellas, it aims to develop a parklike atmosphere on the riverfront block that’s primarily used as a walk-through by visitors.

The downtown/waterfront area already hosts sidewalk carts that sell the usual hot dogs and pretzels. But because Camden doesn’t ordinarily allow food trucks on public property, Cooper’s Ferry is securing a waiver to designate truck parking in a specific lot behind the aquarium. The organization hopes Food Truck Friday will persuade city council members to expand permissions to other parts of the city.

“A quality food truck is a quality amenity for a visitor or a resident of the city,” says Jake Gordon, Cooper’s Ferry’s vice president, who envisions trucks parked next to Rutgers-Camden and the county courthouse.

In mid-April, one food truck, Reuben on Rye, did launch in Camden by parking, with permission, in a law firm parking lot, across the street from City Hall. The operators say their strong opening-week sales persuaded them to start serving breakfast as well as lunch.

“Although we have just been open for a short time, the people of Camden are responding,”says David Serata, who partnered with the owner of Cherry Hill’s Kibitz Room to launch the first of what they hope will become a fleet of Reuben on Ryes.

Their truck serves a scaled-back Kibitz Room menu from the offices of Zucker Steinberg Sonstein Wixted, at 415 Federal St., every weekday except Friday, when they’re on the waterfront.

There have been complaints that city and county annual permitting fees (about $600) far exceed all others in South Jersey, including Cherry Hill ($200 annually) and Haddonfield ($350) without allowing them to leave the designated “food pod.” And Pennsylvania operators face some sticker shock over the New Jersey law that requires food trucks to be equipped with fire suppressant systems, which Bieber says run about $900 to install and take up valuable space that could be used for extra rolls and additional supplies.

Despite the inconveniences and costs, vendors like Jess Iannuzzi and Steve Koste of Bucks County’s Sum Pig Food Truck say they can’t wait to get their permits.

Koste believes a successful Food Truck Friday could enhance the waterfronts of Camden and Philadelphia.

“Anything that can bring more money into Camden and change its perception by boosting fun and boosting the [RiverLink] ferry would be pretty cool,” he says.

 

Recommended Reading

Apr 30, 2013
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Festival Friday


Food Truck Festival, Fun Food Friday is happening at The Plaza on Lakewood at 8911 Lakewood Drive behind CVS between 5 and 8 p.m. Friday, May 3.

Sonoma County’s favorite food trucks, including Chicago Style Hot Dogs, Bun Slinger, Awful Falafel, Fish On! and Foxy Cupcakes will be on hand.

Medical and business professionals in The Plaza will open their doors to public tours. There will be  kids’ activities, raffles, and the Windsor High School cheerleaders and the school’s mascot “Jaggie” will attend the event.

 

-James Lanaras

Recommended Reading

Apr 27, 2013
Tim Lester

Panel backs reprieve for Naper street food sellers, for now

By Susan Frick Carlman
scarlman@stmedianetwork.com

April 25, 2013 9:16PM

na10_gojoeys_p2.jpg


Article Extras





Updated: April 26, 2013 12:32PM

Food cart operators are likely to remain a presence in downtown Naperville this summer — though it still could be their last.

After wrestling with the issue for several months, members of the Downtown Advisory Commission Thursday voted to ask the City Council to allow the two vendors now selling hot dogs and barbecue to keep working past the scheduled mid-summer expiration of their permits, through the end of the year.

Then they’ll resume the wrestling.

Commissioners will recommend that two other permits that have been granted, but are not being used, be suspended. The policy will be revisited again next year.

As she presented the staff’s most recent suggestions for tweaking the policy to address assorted concerns, community planner Allison Laff told the advisory commission that while the sale of food late at night is generally more palatable to existing business owners than lunch-hour vending, which also is allowed under the granted permits, the idea somewhat conflicts with the vision in the downtown plan and is thought by some to be at odds with the city’s image as a family-friendly place.

“There is, we’ve found, limited support from the downtown business community for the downtown vending program as it is,” Laff said.

Christine Jeffries, president of the Naperville Development Partnership, reiterated her opposition to the mobile vending practices, especially late at night. The vendors may sell food from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily and from 10 p.m. to 1:30 a.m. nightly, and until 2:30 a.m. on Friday and Saturday nights.

Although she acknowledged the restaurant owners have not been consulted by the city or the commission formally, Jeffries said of the 45 downtown restaurants, 21 serve food until 11 p.m., and nine keep their kitchens open later.

“I just want to point out that there are businesses, brick and mortar, operating and serving food” at the time when the mobile vendors serve, Jeffries said. “Quite a few of them.”

Other advocates for the business owners also aired qualms about the vending program. Merchant Joe Costello said he could find no compelling reason to allow it, and that it brings no benefit to the downtown brand.

Katie Wood, executive director of the Downtown Naperville Alliance, echoed that perspective.

“I do not feel that having downtown vendors adds to the ambiance of the downtown,” said Wood, who was representing Mike Evans, president of the Naperville Area Chamber of Commerce. Along with Jeffries, Costello and commercial property owner Dwight Yackley, Evans last month voted to discontinue the vending program. The motion failed with a 4-4 vote.

Others see the food carts as a positive thing, however.

“I think the market has spoken as to whether they’re a good idea or not,” said Joe McElroy, a City Council member, who thinks it’s a good idea to offer bar patrons a quick bite before they head home. “They’re doing quite well.”

Responding to assertions that late-night patrons can behave badly, McElroy said there are often problems at Five Guys, which also serves late, that bring out police.

“I have a problem with that,” he said.

Naperville North High School student Austin Hansen, a nonvoting commissioner, said he asked police Chief Bob Marshall about similar troubles in the areas where the street vendors work, and the chief reported there had been none.

Connor McGury, a Naperville Central student who also sits on the commission, wants to gauge the residents’ sentiments on the matter.

“I think it’s more important to ask the public what their opinion is before we ask the restaurant owners what they think,” said McGury, who also thinks the food carts are a plus, but wants the restaurateurs to have a chance to weigh in, too. “It’s cheap, it’s easy and it’s on the go. And that’s how our country is now.”

Commission member and City Councilwoman Judy Brodhead said the brick-and-mortar food merchants are abundantly represented on the commission.

“Maybe over-represented, if we’re thinking about the whole town,” Brodhead said. “I have a very hard time believing somebody selling hot dogs, somebody selling ribs can put Five Guys out of business.”

She added that she doesn’t see the logic in the undue-competition argument.

“I think we’re worrying too much about it,” she said.

Commission chairman Steve Rubin asked rib vendor John Singleton how much he brings in on a good night working his cart in front of the Chicago Avenue parking deck, and Singleton said maybe $250-$300. Rubin agreed it’s not much of a threat to most of the downtown restaurants.

“We’re talking about $300 an evening,” said Rubin, who noted many cities have found success in allowing both forms of commerce. “It seems to be a symbiotic relationship that works.”

Jeffries also appeared displeased that when Joe Hornbaker asked to be allowed to sell his Joey’s Red Hots at the Riverwalk and Main Street late at night instead of Fredenhagen Park, where he is currently required to operate for both shifts, his request was granted.

“So he would be across from Sullivan’s day and night?” she asked.

McElroy didn’t see the logic to that argument, saying, “There’s not many times that I’ve gone out of this building and said, ‘I was going to go for a steak but hey, I think I’ll get a hot dog instead.’”

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