Browsing articles tagged with " street food"
Sep 1, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck Friday: The Meat Truck, LLC

(WTNH)– Owner Jose Perez and his cook/cousin Chris Morales from the The Meat Truck, LLC  show us how to make a Chimichurri Steak Sandwich.

The MEAT truck is a butcher shop inspired, gourmet sandwich truck. It’s the brainchild of a self proclaimed MEAT addict. Jose Perez, had long envisioned starting a food truck business centered on his favorite thing to eat, MEAT.  Their mission is to build a sandwich truck with an emphasis on quality and freshness. The concept is handcrafted, MEAT inspired sandwiches with the MEAT, being the main attraction.  They slow roast, braise, smoke, and grill all of our their MEATS. Whenever possible, they like to purchase our ingredients from local farmers and suppliers.

They can be found at Science Park Thursdays and Fridays from 11-2 for lunch, 344 Winchester Ave. Also, the Sunoco gas station on Rt.80 in New Haven, 350 Foxon Blvd., Fridays from 3-6 and Saturdays 11-6.

For more information, call 203-928-9021  or go to www.themeattruckco.com.

Easy at home recipe:

Chimichurri Steak Sandwich-

Chimichurri sauce-

1-bunch of fresh chopped cilantro with the stems cut off

5- Cloves of garlic- Peeled and crushed

3- chopped green onion (scallion)

¼ cup of extra virgin olive oil

The juice of half of a Lime, squeezed

Salt and Pepper to taste

Mix in bowl thoroughly

Sundried Tomato spread-

½ a cup of pureed sun-dried tomato’s

½ small can of tomato paste (4 oz can)

¼ cup extra virgin olive oil

3 tablespoons of balsamic vinegar

Salt and Pepper to taste

Blend all ingredients in a food processor until smooth.

6oz- steak of choice to desired doneness. Seasoned with salt and pepper

Bread- Ciabatta sub rolls

First, butter and toast Ciabatta bread. Spread sun-dried tomato mixture on the bottom half of the toasted bread, about 1-tablespoon. Add, sliced grilled steak. Top steak with chimichurri sauce, about 1-2 tablespoons. You can add charred red onions as an option.

Apple wood smoked pulled pork sandwich with Apple slaw-

Apple Slaw-

16oz- sliced green cabbage

4oz-sliced red cabbage

2oz- Shaved carrots

4- green onions chopped

2- julienne Green apples

2oz- white vinegar

2-3 tablespoons of granulated sugar

4 tablespoons of mayonnaise

Lime juiced

Salt and pepper to taste

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Sep 1, 2014
Kim Rivers

The Great Food Truck Race feeds hungry Austin singles on latest episode

A few months ago, The Great Food Truck Race rolled into Austin for a weekend of filming around the Capital City. In addition to a stint at Star Bar, the Rattle Inn and Ranch 616, the Food Network show also taps into our hot dating culture. You can see the results when the episode airs Sunday night.

According to a teaser for the “Dinner Dates, Austin Style” episode, competing teams were paired up and sent to a local Match.com event where they fed “the hungriest singles in Austin.” The teams, whose partnership skills were being tested during the challenge, were then forced to switch trucks and sell another team’s food.

Hosted by Tyler Florence, the show pits eight teams of “food truck hopefuls” against each other in culinary competitions across the country. This season’s road trip stretches from Southern California to the beaches of Key West, Florida. 

Austin is the third stop on the seven-city trek. The new episode airs Sunday, August 31 at 8 pm on the Food Network. More details about the show can be found here

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Sep 1, 2014
Tim Lester

Big crowd shows up for Nashville Street Food Awards

NASHVILLE, Tenn. -

Hundreds came out as the Nashville Food Truck Association presented the third annual “Nashville Street Food Awards” Saturday at Nashville Farmers Market. 

More than 30 trucks battled it out for the best of the best. Judges sampled blind entries from the trucks in a variety of street food categories throughout the day including Best Taco, Best Between Bread, Best Smoked and Best Hot Nashville.

Delta Bound took home bragging rights for Best Taco, Best Vegetarian, Best Deep Fried, Best Yazoo and Best of the Best. 

Other honors included Deg Thai for Best Hot Nashville, Smoke Et Al won Best Drink, Bradley’s Curbside Creamery claimed Best Dessert, Best Smoked went to Smoke Et Al, Pita Pit received top honors in the Best Goo Goo Cluster category and Tiger Meat won Best Between Bread.

The Nashville Food Truck Association made a contribution to Musicians Corner at the end of the event.

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Aug 31, 2014
Jim Benson

Halal Guys food cart ‘Guys’ win lawsuit vs. same-name rivals

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpiDavid Handschuh/New York Daily News
“Halal Guys” Abdelbaset Elsayed, left, and Mohamed Abouelenein in their new store on E. 14 St . They won in a lawsuit against same-name rivals Halal Guys of New York.
NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpiDavid Handschuh/New York Daily News
The REAL “Halal Guys,” Abdelbaset Elsayed (far l.) and Mohamed Abouelenein. Above, their original cart.
NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpiJOHN TAGGART/JOHN TAGGART FOR NEW YORK DAILY
The Halal Guys located on the corner of 53rd and 7th Avenue are the go-to guys out of the many Halal food cart offered in Midtown. Center is Omar Mady.
NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpiDavid Handschuh/New York Daily News
The “”Halal Guys” were serving customers from a food cart outside  before they opened their first retail store soon.
  • NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi
  • NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpi
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Enlarge

 

There’s peace in the Middle East — in the Middle Eastern food cart wars, that is.

The operators of the popular Halal Guys food stand and restaurant have beaten a knockoff food business that had been calling itself Halal Guys of New York.

The Halal Guys had argued in federal court last month that the counterfeit carts were trying to cash in on their hard work and reputation.

Their suit said the Halal Guys of New York had been brazenly moving in on their turf — operating one food cart near the Halal Guys’ longtime stand at Sixth Avenue and 53rd St., and another on 14th St., where the Halal Guys just opened their first brick-and-mortar restaurant.

Under the terms of the deal, Halal Guys of New York has five days to “dispose of any signs, banners, promotional or advertising items (including food containers and bags) that bear the mark the Halal Guys, or any colorable imitation.”

Halal Guys of New York’s lawyer, Ehab Moustafa, said his clients surrendered because they can’t afford to fight.

“My client doesn’t have the money,” he said. “He decided it’s not worth it for him to continue.”

NYC PAPERS OUT. Social media use restricted to low res file max 184 x 128 pixels and 72 dpiDavid Handschuh/New York Daily News The “”Halal Guys” offer their famed falafel at their restaurant.

On the other side, the original Halal Guys — Egyptian immigrants Mohamed Abouelenein and Abdelbaset Elsayed, who spent 20 years expanding from a single Midtown food cart to a freestanding restaurant downtown — are poised for international greatness.

Abouelenein, 59, and Elsayed, 51, opened their E. 14th St. restaurant in June — but are also working with the same franchise company that turned Five Guys Burgers and Fries into a nationwide chain. The goal is to license the Halal Guys name.

“For me, the (East Village restaurant) is not my aim,” Abouelenein told the Daily News earlier this summer. “This is just the first step. I am imagining something bigger than this.”

So does Dan Rowe, founder of Fransmart, who wants to expand Halal Guys.

“Halal food is going to become the new standard,” he told The News. “There are already a zillion burger brands.”

JOHN TAGGART

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Aug 31, 2014
Kim Rivers

Meet Big Blue, UB’s first food truck

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Aug 31, 2014
Kim Rivers

Food Truck War Rolls into Town

A man is dead and his mother injured after robbers broke into their Antioch home Saturday morning.
 

 

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Aug 31, 2014
Tim Lester

Stall brings Japanese street food to people of Horsham

When you think about fast food you do not always associate it with Japanese food.

But a Horsham woman is aiming to change that after setting up her own Japanese street food stall in the Carfax.

Teri S.M., owner of the Obanzai food, created the small fast food stall four months ago with the aim of changing the taste buds of residents in Horsham.

“It is just like Chinese or Thai food,” she said. “I am trying to make people here understand there’s a lot of variety in Japanese food.

“It is very challenging as we have to adapt to working on a smaller scale and introduce an alternative Japanese cuisine in Horsham.”

Teri was born in Singapore and moved with her husband to Italy where she owned a Japanese restaurant for ten years. She recently moved to Horsham and has spent the last three years working in Wabi. Teri is now using this experience to bring the taste of Japan to the streets of Horsham.

“Our menu consists of fresh sushi made on site and a set lunch of rice or noodles with meats such as chicken teriyaki and pork tonkatsu, schnitzel, with vegetables,” She said.

“We have snacks and delicacies which can be consumed at any time of the day like okonomiyaki (cabbage and ginger pancakes), hitari buns (steamed buns with meat fillings), takoyaki (pastry dough with octopus) fried noodles, and seaweed salad.

“We also have a vegetarian menu for which we make sure all the ingredients are 100 per cent vegetarian.”

One aspect of Teri’s business that not many others can offer is a different menu every day.

“If I want to change it I can,” she said “That’s the best bit about working on my own.”

The stall is open in the market all day on Thursdays and Saturdays.

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Aug 31, 2014
Kim Rivers

Boulder Valley using food truck to boost school lunch participation

Students pouring out of Boulder’s Fairview High School last week for lunch found a new option right in their parking lot.

The Boulder Valley School District brought its food truck to the school for the first time, dishing up made-to-order chicken pesto sandwiches, BBQ pork sliders, pesto and provolone grilled cheeses, and burgers.

About 70 students and teachers tried the truck, which takes credit cards and cash along with letting students use their school lunch accounts. Students who qualify for free or reduced-price lunches also can order.

“They get to come outside and eat a nutritious lunch that’s a little different,” said Brandy Dreibelbis, Boulder Valley food services district manager.

The district is rotating the truck among its large high schools — Boulder, Fairview, Monarch, Centaurus and Broomfield — with each school getting the truck one day a week.

After serving students lunch, the truck makes a stop three days a week at the district’s administrative offices.

The district bought the pre-owned truck, which is equipped with a sound system and runs off generators, with a $75,000 donation from Whole Foods. The goal is to up the appeal of school lunches, boosting the district’s high school numbers. Now, less than 20 percent of the district’s high school students buy hot lunches at school.

At Fairview, students and administrators said the school cafeteria is rarely used by students. Even those who buy lunch eat in the halls or outside.

Fairview senior Matt Schreiner was one of the students who tried the food truck, saying he ordered because he didn’t have time to drive to lunch.

“I would definitely order again,” he said.

Senior Sydney Chinowsky said she usually brings her lunch, but likes the option of a food truck to add more variety.

“It’s pretty good,” she said about her pesto grilled cheese. “A food truck has more appeal than the cafeteria.”

Debelius said the district is still figuring out the menu, looking for items that will hold the most appeal to students, can be made from ingredients the district is already using in its lunch program and fit healthy lunch guidelines.

The most popular menu item in the first week, Debelius said, was the BBQ pork sliders.

Other items the district tried in the first week included spicy chicken quesadillas, a veggie burger and a grilled cheese with jalapenos and bacon.

Two people are running the truck: veteran food service worker Quentin Kilpatrick and culinary instructor Rosie Harris.

“I love to feed people,” Kilpatrick said. “The food truck will allow us to reach a different demographic of students.”

Along with developing a solid menu, marketing the truck is the district’s other main challenge. The district took the truck to the Boulder Farmers’ Market and several other events during the summer to get the word out.

The district also recently started a food truck Facebook page — facebook.com/pages/BVSD-School-Food-Project-Food-Truck — so students can track the schedule and menu.

To increase interest, there’s a contest through the page to name the truck and plans for some giveaways.

Contact Camera Staff Writer Amy Bounds at 303-473-1341, boundsa@dailycamera.com or twitter.com/boundsa.

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Aug 31, 2014
Tim Lester

Oakland Local launches “Street food: Meet the people who make it”

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We rely on them to nourish us with their Tandoori chicken, grilled vegetable burritos, Chapati and lentil stews.  We count on their convenient locations when we are rushing around or just want to be outdoors instead of inside a restaurant. We love that they add to our festivities on First Fridays.

But who are the cooks and vendors who supply us with wonderful food from their food trucks and street carts? What challenges to they face as they do this work? What kinds of journeys led them here?

 

Read more of this story at Oakland Local: http://bit.ly/VNSBFP

Follow Oakland Local on Facebook and Twitter for local, community news written by Oakland residents.

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