Browsing articles tagged with " wine festivals"
Jul 13, 2014
Terri Judson

Hear ye, hear ye: Volunteers needed for pet benefit wine festival July 18, 19 – Hudson Hub

Volunteers are needed for the seventh annual Hudson Wine Festival, slated for July 18 and 19 on Village Way.

Volunteers are needed before, during and after the festival for various activities and typically will work a shift of three to four hours. For their service, volunteers can get a break on admission costs and a T-shirt and water. To sign up visit www.hudsonwinefestival.com/volunteers.

The wine festival is a benefit for animal welfare groups in Northeast Ohio including People Care Pet Pantry, PAWSibilities Humane Society of Greater Akron, Spay Neuter Ohio and Rescue Ohio English Bulldogs.

“We look forward to another successful event and supporting animal welfare in our area. Our continued partnerships with Discount Drug Mart, Adams Reserve New York Extra Sharp Cheddar, Rubber City Radio Group, First Main Hudson and Merrill Lynch will enable us to cast a wider net in the community and generate additional awareness for the many animals that are in constant need,” said Debra Sherman, president of Connecting For A Cause, which is staging the event.

According to Sherman, more than $90,000 for area animal welfare organizations has been donated from the annual wine festivals.

Dana Ray is the executive director People Care Pet Pantry, one of the animal welfare agencies benefitting from the festival.

“Through donations, we help people who have fallen on hard times feed their animals — from fish to horses,” Ray said.

People Care Pet Pantry assists with animal needs in Summit, Portage and Stark counties, according to Ray.

“The wine festival helps to make people aware of who we are and what we do,” she said. “And it helps with donations we really need.”

Helping our furry friends while enjoying more than 150 wines and more than 45 craft beers. What could be better?

Toss food into the mix from Manny’s Mac Cue and the Fired Up Mobile Cafe, sprinkle in musical entertainment, educational seminars and artists and exhibitors and you’ve got a recipe for two exceptional days.

The festival is July 18 from 4 to 10 p.m. and July 19 from 2 to 10 p.m.

“We’re looking to host more than 7,500 guests this year,” Sherman said.

Leashed pets are welcome at the Hudson Wine Festival and amenities such as water bowls, doggie pools and the occasional biscuit will be available to pamper the pooches.

Pets also be available for adoption.

“We’re adding more food vendors and bringing in Cupcake Vineyard’s mobile tasting truck,” Sherman added.

Another new feature this year is provided by Merrill Lynch.

“They are having a Pet Portrait Studio booth where people can photograph their pets,” Sherman said.

Guests are able to purchase a selection of wines and beers by the full glass on site at the full pour bar with their taste tickets.

Friday’s festivities also will include the movie “Gravity” on the First Main Green after dusk.

Wine Canvas will return allowing guests in the tasting area to partake in a free art class of and paint a mini masterpiece while enjoying beverages.

Tickets to the festival are $22 in advance and $27 at the event. The ticket entitles the ticket holder to 10 tastings and a souvenir wine glass. More tastings may be purchased for $1 each. Weekend passes are also available for $32 in advance and $37 at the door allowing for daily admission.

Designated driver tickets are available on site for $10 and include two soft drinks.

Advance sale tickets are available at local Discount Drug Mart stores, The Hudson Visitor Center (weekends only), Epiphany in First Main Hudson, Janet Rhodes Brings You Fair Trade on Main Street and online at www.hudsonwinefestival.com.

Email: dmarkulis@recordpub.com

Phone: 330-541-9436

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Jul 12, 2014
Terri Judson

Chestnut Ridge Artist Colony

Roane County Hills Harbor Artist Colony

By JAMES E. CASTO

For The State Journal

When artist-blacksmith Jeff Fetty began searching the area around Spencer for a place to relocate his metalworking shop, he found something more — an ideal site for a colony of working artists.

Today, the Chestnut Ridge Artist Colony is a reality, thanks to the efforts of Fetty, Spencer Mayor Terry A. Williams and the Spencer Development Authority.

Located on Chestnut Ridge overlooking downtown Spencer, the colony is home to three resident artists — Fetty, Phil Holcomb and Teresa Holcomb — and stands ready to welcome more.

The City of Spencer has more than 200 acres on which artists can design and develop their dream studios. The property features full city utility hookups as well as three-phase power. While only minutes from downtown Spencer, the site borders hundreds of acres of both city and private undeveloped land.

When Fetty invited longtime friends Phillip and Teresa Holcomb to join the colony, they jumped at the chance and built their 2,400-square foot workshop, gallery and home at the colony in 2009.

Both Holcombs are full-time artists. Phil is a master luthier, woodworker and instructor and Teresa is an award-winning jewelry designer. The two also sometimes work together, creating a variety of wooden accessories. Work from the pair can currently be found at about 150 galleries that wholesale the items.

Teresa Holcomb explained that she and her husband were amateur wine makers, but about two years ago the pair started planting a vineyard and building what would become Chestnut Ridge Winery. She said they’ve been in business as a winery for about a year and have been attending wine festivals as well as entertaining customers.

“We get a lot of people from out of state who come,” she said. “Our winery is large enough — almost a 4,000-square foot winery — so we have enough of an area that we can rent it out for business meetings and private events.”

Teresa Holcomb said she and her husband already have even more expansions planned, such as a music pavilion.

“Within the next year, we’ll have a wood-fired pizza oven, and we’re building a second tasting room right now, so when we have our upstairs rented out for events, we can continue waiting on customers,” Teresa Holcomb said.

The colony also features a hiking and biking trail that leads to Ben’s Run Dam.

“We’ve been having quite a few customers hiking the trail and stopping for some wine,” Teresa Holcomb said. “We’ll continue with the woodworking and the jewelry, but right now the winery is taking center stage.”

She said the colony makes her business more of a draw for visitors because one location provides access to more than one artist.

Visitors to the Chestnut Ridge Artists Colony are welcome year-round. However, Fetty requests that visitors contact him first at jeff@jefffetty.com.

Phil and Teresa Holcomb can be contacted at 304-927-4831 or wvdulcimers@frontier.com.

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Jul 12, 2014
Terri Judson

Burger Fest, wine festivals among weekend Standouts

TODAY (THURSDAY) SATURDAY

Blue Ridge Quilt Festival

The largest quilt show in Southwest Virginia offers an extensive quilt and wearable exhibit and two special exhibits: “Tales from a Mayan Huipil” and “Dare to Dance: An Artist’s Interpretation of Joy.” There will be a vendor mall, workshops, lectures, door prizes and a raffle quilt. Quilt appraisals and a Quilt Documentation Day are planned for Saturday. International artist, lecturer and teacher Jennie Rayment from Great Britain will talk about her work during the reception and book signing on Wednesday from 2:30 to 4 p.m. The festival continues through July 12 and times vary each day. $7. Blacksburg Middle School, 3109 Prices Fork Road, Blacksburg. www.brqfestival.com.


FRIDAY

Movies in the Market

Bring a blanket or lawn chair and some snacks for a showing of “The Lego Movie.” 7 p.m. Free. Market Square, downtown Roanoke. 342-2028.


FRIDAY

ZooDo!

The event will begin with light hors d’oeuvres, followed by a catered full-course dinner from Outback Steakhouse. Entertainment will be provided by Tim Shepherd and the Antlers of Protection, with a special appearance by Lil’ Roger. 6:30 p.m. $50. Mill Mountain Zoo, Mill Mountain Park, Roanoke. 343-3241.


SATURDAY

Roanoke restaurants, food trucks compete in first Big Lick Burger Fest


SATURDAY

Parks and Arts

Family fun featuring performances by Roanoke Chamber Brass, The Wright Kids and Silly Bus, with face painting by Katherine Devine and acrylic painting activities with Gwyn Hall, as well as a bouncy house. Noon to 3 p.m. Free. Golden Park, Carlisle Avenue, Roanoke. 853-5652.


SATURDAY

Charity Ball

An enchanting night full of food, music and dancing. All proceeds benefit The American Cancer Society. Dress is black tie optional. Tickets also come with a free couple’s group lesson from Sapphire Ballroom. 7 to 11 p.m. $50. Patrick Henry Ballroom, 611 S. Jefferson St., Roanoke. 524-8514.


SATURDAY

Annual Summer Breeze Wine Festival

A special event to benefit the Augusta Regional SPCA. The animal shelter will be on hand with some of their furry friends who are in need of loving families. There’ll be live music, tastings, and festival fun at the winery. Noon to 6 p.m. $10; D’Vine Wine Club members, free (donation requested); children, free with canned pet food donations. Rockbridge Vineyard, 35 Hillview Lane, Raphine. www.rockbridgevineyard.com.


SATURDAY

Horse Hound Wine Festival

Enjoy wine from some of Virginia’s finest wineries while listening to music and visiting art, craft and food vendors. This unique wine festival has numerous events throughout the day with horses and dogs as the primary attractions, such as the Parade of Horses, a lure course and muskrat racing. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. $20. Peaks of Otter Winery Orchards, 2122 Sheep Creek Road, Bedford. 586-3707.


SATURDAY

19th Annual New River Valley Garden Tour

This self-guided tour is held rain or shine and features seven gardens in the Blacksburg area. Local Master Gardeners will be in each garden to answer questions. Musicians from Renaissance Music Academy will be in select gardens entertaining the tourists. Proceeds benefit local library programs. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. $12 advance, $15 door. Blacksburg Library, 200 Miller Ave., Blacksburg. 381-4846.


TUESDAY

Concert Variety Show

The Fine Arts Center for the New River Valley and the town of Pulaski are co-sponsoring a variety show featuring the Blues Brothers Tribute Artists, Josh Livingston, Jarrod Millsaps, and more. 6:30 p.m. $10 advance, $12 door, free for children 12 and younger. Calfee Park, 700 S. Washington Ave., Pulaski. 980-7363.

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Jul 11, 2014
Terri Judson

Flavor! Napa Valley 2014 Tickets Now On Sale








NAPA VALLEY, Calif., July 9, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — Tickets are now on sale for the fourth annual Flavor! Napa Valley, November 19-23, the area’s five-day celebration of food, wine and fun. Featuring legendary Napa Valley wineries, restaurants and chefs, the festival also showcases star culinary talent from across the U.S., including graduates of The Culinary Institute of America (CIA), the festival’s beneficiary. 

Festivities will include events such as celebrity chef demonstrations and intimate in-the-field workshops with purveyors as part of a series entitled Terroir to Table: Farm, Cellar, Kitchen Experience. Area vintners will host wine-paired dinners at their wineries and top winemakers will lead wine tastings at the historic CIA Greystone campus in St. Helena – events only offered in the Napa Valley, setting it apart from other food and wine festivals. The biggest party of the long weekend, The Appellation Trail, will feature nearly 25 restaurants and 100 wineries. Tickets can be purchased at flavornapavalley.com.

Renowned chefs joining the festival for the first time include Dean Fearing (CIA ’78) of Fearing’s Restaurant in Dallas, Duff Goldman (CIA ’98) of Charm City Cakes in Baltimore, Melissa Perello (CIA ’96) of Frances in San Francisco, bestselling author of The Pound A Day Diet Rocco DiSpirito (CIA ’86), Trevor Kunk (CIA ’03) of PRESS in Napa Valley, and culinary author Lee Brian Schrager (CIA ’79).

Celebrated returning chefs include Michael Chiarello (CIA ’82) of Bottega Napa Valley and Coqueta in San Francisco, Todd English (CIA ’82) of Todd English Enterprises, Larry Forgione (CIA ’74) of The CIA’s Conservatory Restaurant at Greystone, Christopher Kostow of The Restaurant at Meadowood Napa Valley, Masaharu Morimoto of Morimoto Napa, and Charlie Palmer (CIA ’79) of the eponymous restaurant group and the CIA’s Chairman of the Board.

Wine experts include Master Sommeliers Robert Bath, Tim Gaiser, Peter Granoff and Andrea Robinson, Napa Valley vintner Peter Mondavi Jr., and winemaker Mike McGrath, among many others.

Tickets for this year’s festival range from $75 for First Taste Napa to $295 for the Welcome Dinner. To read the full release please visit: http://flavornapavalley.com/files/2014/07/Flavor_ticket_schedule_release.pdf

About Flavor! Napa Valley®
The five-day Flavor! Napa Valley® Celebration of Food, Wine Fun is an annual event featuring world-class Napa Valley wines alongside Napa Valley’s master chefs and graduates of The Culinary Institute of America. Net proceeds from the event support programs and scholarships at The Culinary Institute of America’s Greystone Campus in St. Helena. The event is hosted in partnership with Visit Napa Valley, The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone, Napa Valley Vintners, and founding sponsors Silverado Resort and Spa and Dolce Hotels and Resorts, and is produced by Karlitz Company. For more details on the festival, including where to stay, please visit flavornapavalley.com. Additionally, visit us on Facebook at facebook.com/FlavorNapaValley, and follow @FlavorNapa on Twitter.

Media Contact:
Margaux Lushing
margaux@visitnapavalley.com
707-260-0114

SOURCE Flavor! Napa Valley

RELATED LINKS
http://www.flavornapavalley.com

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Jul 11, 2014
Terri Judson

Hotel has fibre-optics galore

Family checks into hotel room and immediately dad fires up the laptop to do some work.

Mom starts to check email on her tablet.

And the three kids break out the smartphones to stream video, play games, Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.

Now multiply that Internet action by 176 rooms and you have “a gazillion devices dragging down bandwidth,” according to Brenda Rayburn, the sales and marketing director at Best Western Hotel in Kelowna.

The hotel’s solution is the installation of a kilometre of fibre-optics inside the hotel and another 200 metres outside to offer complete super-high-speed Internet over the entire property, including the 10-storey tower, two-storey U-shaped lowrise, lobby, breezeway, pub, restaurant and poolside.

Unlike traditional cable Internet, fibre-optics are specialized wires that allow data to be transmitted much faster.

“We were constantly uprgrading our cable bandwidth, however it could never keep up,” said Rayburn.

“So, we took a big leap.”

The hotel installed the fibre-optics in May, but waited until now to announce it so it

would have dozens of compliments about the speed of its Internet as testimonials.

“The logistics to install fibre-optics were a huge challenge,” said Best Western Kelowna CEO Greg Salloum.

“But this trend of travellers using multiple devices is here to stay. Efficient Internet has become one of the top amenities guests look for when they’re searching for Kelowna hotels, so we know in the big picture this is the right decision.”

Senator Ross Fitzpatrick, the former owner of CedarCreek Winery in Kelowna, was

honoured this week with the B.C. Wine Industry Recognition Award.

The accolade is handed out by the B.C. Wine Institue to only the most deserving industry leaders.

Fitzpatrick, 81, recently sold his winery to West Kelowna’s Mission Hill Winery, but CedarCreek continues to be run as a separate operation.

However, the Fitzpatrick family maintains ownership of Greata Ranch Winery near Peachland, which is rebranding itself an Okanagan sparkling wine specialist.

Fitzpatrick worked at B.C. Tree Fruits and SunRype early in his career before moving to Vancouver and making his fortune in aerospace, oil and gas and mining.

He returned to the Okanagan to start CedarCreek in 1986 and became a pioneer in planting vinifera grape varieties to produce premium wines.

Soon after, most other wineries and grape growers switched to vinifera for better wines.

“The senator exemplified the intent of the award, which was created to recognize those who have helped to develop the wine industry in our province,” said institute chairwoman Josie Tyabji.

“His efforts and leadership have helped shape the industry as we know it today.”

Along the way he was appointed to the Senate by then prime minister Jean Chretien.

Fitzpatrick has also been honoured with the Order of British Columbia and a Canadian Confederation Medal.

CedarCreek twice won Canadian Winery of the Year.

In 2013, local MPs Ron Cannan and Dan Albas won the B.C. Wine Industry Award for their efforts to modernize Canadian wine laws with Bill C-311.

In an article in America’s largest circulation newspaper, USA Today, wine expert

Kerry Wooland refers to the Okanagan as “drop dead gorgeous.”

“Tucked between two mountain ranges, the Okanagan Valley enjoys rural character, dramatic vistas and abundant outdoor adventures to occupy the time between tastings,” said Wooland.

On Wooland’s recommendation, USA Today made the Okanagan one of 20 nominees for its Readers’ Choice 2014 Best Wine Region to Visit contest.

From now until Aug. 4, you can vote for the best at 10Best.com/Awards/Travel.

The Okanagan has some tough competition.

Some of the other nominees include much-more famous wine regions as Champagne, France; Napa, California; Tuscany, Italy; Burgundy, France; La Rioja, Spain; and Marlborough, New Zealand.

“For the Okanagan Valley to be recognized in this global voting would be a terrific indication of how the Okanagan has developed into one of the world’s premier wine tourism destinations,” said Ellen Walker-Matthews, the marketing chairwoman for the Okanagan Wine Festivals Society.

The average selling price of single-family homes in Kelowna is up slightly, while condominium prices are stagnant.

The second-quarter report from Royal LePage shows the average selling price of a bungalow in the city was $370,000 for the three months ended June 30, up 2.8 per cent over the same period last year.

The average condo selling price stayed the same at $185,000.

“There is renewed enthusiasm and confidence in Kelowna homes from buyers, including out-of-province buyers from Alberta,” said Steve Gray, managing broker at Royal LePage Kelowna.

He forecasts prices will rise two to three per cent during the rest of the year.

The highest average price for a bungalow in Canada is in Vancouver at $1.1 million, the cheapest is $149,000 in Moncton.

The priciest condos are in Vancouver at $492,000 and the least expensive in Charlottetown at $130,000.

Cities with a similar bungalow average selling price to Kelowna’s are, Edmonton at $350,400, Saskatoon with $375,000 and Ottawa at $401,700.

Steve MacNaull is a business reporter and columnist with The Daily Courier. Reach him at steve.macnaull@ok.bc.ca.

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Jul 11, 2014
Terri Judson

Best Bets: Clifford Keith Band to rule The Roost at Delaware State Fair

All roads led back to Delaware for the Clifford Keith Band. Later this month, they will lead to the Delaware State Fair.

The Sussex County-based country/bluegrass-tinged group will play the fair’s new Roost Beer and Wine Garden the evenings of July 17, 18 and 26.

The band, which started in 2010, is essentially comprised of rhythm guitarist and lead vocalist Cliff McCall and harmonica player and singer Luke Burton. Other members of the band come in and out, supplying other instrumentation as needed for any occasion.

Lifelong friends who grew up next door to each other in Georgetown, Mr. McCall and Mr. Burton went their separate ways after high school but reunited a few years ago.

“I went off to Pennsylvania for trade school and Luke had his own thing going. But when I came back to the Delaware music scene, I reconnected with him and some other musician friends who we grew up with and we took a stab at putting something together,” said the 25-year-old Mr. McCall, who graduated from Sussex Tech High.

“We’ve done lots of traveling but all ended up back in little old Delaware.”

For a few years, Mr. McCall played solo under the name Clifford Keith, using his middle name, but was looking for more musically.

“When you’re a solo act, you gain a lot of tools in terms of performing for crowds and the music but I was itching to put a band together. The more the merrier,” Mr. McCall said.

The laid-back sound of the band has been a hit around the area, performing their own tunes and covering songs by everyone from Adele and Billy Joel to Johnny Cash and Michael Jackson.

“I don’t consider myself a great musician but if I hear a song once, I can usually pick up the hook and the different instrumental parts and recognize it as a great song,” Mr. McCall said.

“It can happen in all different genres. If it’s a fantastic song, it’s a fantastic song. We just love playing great songs. So we can go from a (folk-pop) Of Monsters and Men song right into a (country) Kenny Chesney song and make it seem like a smooth transition. Now for both, it’s our take on it but it’s still great music by great artists.”

The band, which will also play Saturday night at Arena’s in Milford starting at 8, got its first taste of the Harrington fairgrounds when it played the first Triple Threat BBQ, Beer and Music Festival in April.

“The fair has a ton of resources, connections and networks. The barbecue festival brought people from all over the country,” Mr. McCall said.

“For us as musicians, this is a great opportunity. There aren’t that many places down here that offer music on a large scale like that.”

In addition to playing their wide-ranging covers, Mr. McCall said the band will also play some of its original music.

“We’re on the audience’s territory so we have to meet them halfway. So we’ll play lots of covers but also throw in our own stuff,” he said.

“I think it’s a great way to engage the audience. You can tell them a story about the song, where you were when you wrote it, what you were thinking about and then play it for them. We’re just really excited about the whole thing.”

The fair’s new Roost has the capacity to seat 400 people looking for an adult beverage. In the past, the only place to grab a beer was in the grandstand area during one of the concerts.

“For us, we’re always looking at ways to expand our offerings at the fairgrounds,” said Danny Aguilar, the fair’s director of marketing and assistant general manager.

“We think this is a great way for folks looking for ways to relax before and after a show.”

Partnering with NKS Distributors, The Roost will feature various craft brews as well as offerings from local wineries.

The five beers on tap will be Bud Light, Land Shark, Johnny Appleseed, Shock Top and Dover’s own Fordham.

“The beers are modeled after what’s popular around the area at some of the bigger pubs,” Mr. Aguilar said.

Wine will also be available in The Roost with a different area winery showcasing their product each day during the fair.

The Roost will be situated in an area that hasn’t been used much up until now. It will be on Smith Street south of the Dover Building next to The Plaza.

“In the past, it’s been sort of a dead street,” Mr. Aguilar said.

“But this area offers tons of shade and we think it will be a nice venue to kick back and have a brew.”

Drawing on the popularity of area beer and wine festivals, fair officials are hoping The Roost will expand in the future.

“We’ll be getting a lot of feedback from folks this year to find out what they want and like about a venue such as this so it can hopefully be bigger and better in the years to come,” Mr. Aguilar said.

The Roost will be open every day from 3 to 11 p.m. and Roost visitors must be 21 years of age or older.

The Delaware State Fair starts July 17 and runs through July 26.

Wheely good deal

It may be the middle of summer, but the cooler days of fall are not far away. The next early bird deadline for the Amish Country Bike Tour, set for Saturday, Sept. 6, is July 31, where registration saves cyclists $10.

Registration by that date is $50 per adult; $25 for those 5-16 years old with kids under 5 free.

Beginning Aug.1 through Sept. 6, registration is $60 per adult; $30 for kids and teens 5-16 with those under 5, free. Cyclists may register onsite the day of the event from 7 to 10 a.m.

Now in its 28th year, this cycling event is the largest in Delaware and one of the largest on the East Coast.

The tour starts and stops at Legislative Mall. It offers five loops: 15, 25, 50, 62 and 100 miles, so cyclists from 1 (ride-alongs) to 82 participate.

The new Home 2 Suites hotel in Dover is hosting a Finish Line Party at the backyard fire pit and grill for cyclists staying at the property.

Another new aspect of the tour is the bike tour arts weekend. Dover Art League is partnering with the Dover Public Library and local Parke Green Galleries to present the Amish Art Loop on the weekend of Sept. 5-7.

An opening reception will be held on First Friday, Sept. 5, from 5 to 7 p.m. The public and Amish Country Bike Tour cyclists are invited to attend free of charge.

The Amish Art Loop is a self-directed art tour which will cover sections of Governors Avenue, Loockerman Street, Federal Street and State Street. Maps will be provided at all participating locations, and the tour is free and open to the public.

On the afternoon of Saturday, Sept. 6, the Dover Art League will feature an Amish quilt presentation in its Holden Gallery with a speaker covering the Delaware Amish culture.

In the downstairs gallery, the League will feature art related to Amish life and bikes, to coincide with the bike tour. The Dover Public Library will feature a group show and Parke Green Galleries will have a focused Amish-themed show as well as a Saturday evening reception from 5 to 8.

For more information and to register, visit www.AmishCountryBikeTour.com. Cyclists can register online or download a registration form and mail it to tour producer Kent County Tourism office at 435 N. DuPont Highway, Dover, DE 19901.

For additional information, call (302) 734-4888.

New director at music school

The Music School of Delaware recently named Kate Inie-Richards as the new branch director for the school’s Milford branch at 10 S. Walnut St.

”I am thrilled to begin the position, and am very excited to continue growing The Music School of Delaware in Kent and Sussex counties,” she said. “Everyone in the local Milford community has been very welcoming and

I am looking forward to working with the local businesses and individuals to help develop and build the music scene even more.”

A new resident of Milford, Ms. Inie-Richards is a violinist and violist, originally from Phoenixville, Pa. She holds a Bachelor’s of Music from the University of Memphis and a Master’s of Music in Suzuki Pedagogy from Ithaca College. She is a graduate of Interlochen Arts Academy in Interlochen, Mich.

Ms. Inie-Richards maintains a large private studio of violin and viola students of all ages. A member of the Music School’s Suzuki violin/viola faculty, Ms. Inie-Richards will continue teaching in addition to serving as Milford branch director.

“I am a dedicated Suzuki violin and viola teacher,” she said, “and I really want to help develop programs for students of all ages, from our littlest ones in the Early Childhood music classes all the way up to our adult and senior students.”

The Music School of Delaware, founded in 1924, is the only statewide, accredited, community music school in the nation, serving residents of Delaware, Pennsylvania, New Jersey and Maryland.

For more information, visit www.musicschoolofdelaware.org.

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Jul 11, 2014
Terri Judson

Paso Robles – cab country?

If Napa Valley is famous for its cabernets and Sonoma for its pinot noirs, what wine comes to mind when you think of Paso Robles?

Probably Rhône wines.

For more than 20 years, the area’s Hospice du Rhône auction has focused attention on wines made from varieties from the Rhone Valley, even though the event welcomes wineries from elsewhere — including many from the French homeland of the grapes.

Likewise, the Rhône Rangers are active there and local producers like Tablas Creek are noted for their Rhône varietal wines.

Rhone grapes account for only 17 percent of the plantings in Paso; Bordeaux varieties, notably cabernet, far outnumber them.

And cabs are hot, while American Rhônes remain a hard sell to wine lovers.

Now a group of local growers and wineries in the Paso Robles region is trying to change the area’s vinous image. They want to make its cabs pre-eminent in the mind of wine lovers, though they acknowledge that unseating Napa in the market would be tough.

In the process, however, they hope to snatch some of the dollars headed for Napa and raise the prices they can charge for their wines.

Inspired by Daou Vineyards owner-winemaker Daniel Daou, who grew up in France, Bordeaux growers and winemakers formed the Paso Robles CAB (Cabernet and Bordeaux) Collective two years ago to promote the idea. They hold co-joined trade days and consumer events showcasing these wines.

The Paso Robles experience

To step back for a bigger picture, Paso Robles itself is a pleasant city of 30,000 halfway between Los Angeles and San Francisco. It lies at about 750 feet in altitude.

Few Bay Area residents are likely to choose it as their favored wine destination but it’s a natural attraction for Southern Californians.

“They have to drive through Paso to get to Napa!” complained winemaker Michael Mooney of Paso’s Chateau Margene on a panel discussing Paso Robles Cabs at the recent CABs of Distinction conference.

Early growers were inspired by Andre Tschelistcheff to plant cab, but Gary Eberle really proved the region’s suitability for the variety starting in 1973.

The Paso Robles (and the residents seem to be trending toward the Spanish pronunciation, not “ro-buls”) American Viticultural Area occupies much of the northern part of San Luis Obispo County. The southern half across a mountain range is significantly cooler and grows different grapes in Arroyo Grande and Edna Valley.

Though it’s an oversimplification that upsets many local growers and winemakers, the Paso region is conveniently split in two:

The part west of Paso Robles (and Highway 101) tends to be hilly, or even mountainous, and cooler and wetter.

The east is flatter, hotter and drier, though it has a wide daily temperature swing even on hot days. Still, claims David Parrish of Parrish Family Vineyard, “Paso Robles has a Goldilocks climate — not too hot, and not too cold.”

The area has applied to split into 11 AVAs, a prospect that some locals say will help elevate their areas, but is likely to be lost or even confuse most wine lovers. They did learn from Napa, however, and will require the labels to feature “Paso Robles,” even if they mention a smaller division.

Most of the grapes come from the warmer, drier area and go to wineries like J. Lohr, Hahn, Beringer, Constellation and Gallo. They mostly go into moderately priced wine that’s a good value.

Naturally, local wineries tout their “better” wines. Although the area is hot in the summer, the wines tend to be more restrained than those of Napa, though whether that’s style or conditions isn’t clear.

Local growers admit that they learned from Napa’s replanting after phylloxera damaged vineyards in the 1990s and chose rootstocks, cultivars, configuration and vineyard practices optimum for their conditions. Some went for high production, others opted for higher quality. Some of those wineries producing in high volume, like J. Lohr, produced excellent wines that achieved wide acceptance.

A big question for the area, however, is water. The east side has had to institute water restrictions, including prohibiting new plantings in many areas, due to the drought, and is trying to find long-term solutions as the area doesn’t receive enough water to grow grapevines.

The city of Paso Robles averages about 15 inches of rain, but eastern areas only get about 8 to 10 inches even in an average year, though the mountains west of the city can accumulate 40 inches from the nearby Pacific Ocean. Grapevines need the equivalent of about 30 inches -– but not all applied in the winter — to be productive. Lack of water could limit Paso Robles’ future as a wine-growing region.

Visiting Paso Robles

Like Healdsburg and Sonoma, Paso Robles is built around a plaza, creating the epitome of a wine country destination.

A few years ago, Paso Robles was hit by a devastating earthquake, but it has recovered. The south side of the plaza features a museum and arts center, with shops and restaurants around the north and east, and the sprawling Paso Robles Inn completing the picture.

Unlike Napa, Paso Robles has many streets lined with retail stores aimed at locals as well as tourists, not just restaurants and wine tasting salons.

I spent one night at the new Oaks Hotel a little north of downtown. It’s a number of steps up from the usual business hotel, with a spa, restaurant and bar, but reasonable and comfortable. The owners are omnipresent, friendly and helpful, a good sign you’ll enjoy the visit.

I also had a splurge night at Just Inn, the three-room BB, plus cottage, at Justin Winery. Not only does it have luxury accommodations but a gourmet restaurant, both outlawed at wineries in Napa Valley. It’s good to have the restaurant onsite since it’s a fair ride from town over winding hills. Naturally, the food is as good as the accommodations. It would be a delightful romantic getaway.

Back in town, Paso Robles has changed dramatically from the days when it didn’t even have an Italian restaurant — in an area noted for red wines. That deficiency has been corrected in spades, including with the excellent Buona Tavola with Northern Italian food from Piedmontese Antonio Varia.

Many other restaurants of all types becko but Artisan on the plaza serves innovative small and large plates highlighting, well, artisanal producers, many local.

And if you think we’re obsessed with wine in Napa Valley Paso Robles boasts a radio station that bills itself as the Krush with numerous programs about wine including ones focusing on “garagistes” (small innovative owner-winemakers who may even make their wine in their garage!). It also has commercials for winemaking supplies and equipment like corks and presses, and regularly broadcasts geeky wine information like transpiration and botrylis indices.

Paso Robles has many wine festivals during the year, but remember that it does get hot in the summer. Fortunately, it’s only a hop across the mountains to picturesque Cambria on the coast and a short drive from there to Hearst Castle or Morro Bay.

The region is four hours down Highway 101, or you can take the train from Fairfield or Martinez, even an Amtrak bus from Napa. The train stops right in the middle of Paso Robles.

Recommended Reading

Jul 11, 2014
Terri Judson

ZooDo, wine festivals among weekend Standouts

TODAY (THURSDAY) SATURDAY

Blue Ridge Quilt Festival

The largest quilt show in Southwest Virginia offers an extensive quilt and wearable exhibit and two special exhibits: “Tales from a Mayan Huipil” and “Dare to Dance: An Artist’s Interpretation of Joy.” There will be a vendor mall, workshops, lectures, door prizes and a raffle quilt. Quilt appraisals and a Quilt Documentation Day are planned for Saturday. International artist, lecturer and teacher Jennie Rayment from Great Britain will talk about her work during the reception and book signing on Wednesday from 2:30 to 4 p.m. The festival continues through July 12 and times vary each day. $7. Blacksburg Middle School, 3109 Prices Fork Road, Blacksburg. www.brqfestival.com.


FRIDAY

Movies in the Market

Bring a blanket or lawn chair and some snacks for a showing of “The Lego Movie.” 7 p.m. Free. Market Square, downtown Roanoke. 342-2028.


FRIDAY

ZooDo!

The event will begin with light hors d’oeuvres, followed by a catered full-course dinner from Outback Steakhouse. Entertainment will be provided by Tim Shepherd and the Antlers of Protection, with a special appearance by Lil’ Roger. 6:30 p.m. $50. Mill Mountain Zoo, Mill Mountain Park, Roanoke. 343-3241.


SATURDAY

Parks and Arts

Family fun featuring performances by Roanoke Chamber Brass, The Wright Kids and Silly Bus, with face painting by Katherine Devine and acrylic painting activities with Gwyn Hall, as well as a bouncy house. Noon to 3 p.m. Free. Golden Park, Carlisle Avenue, Roanoke. 853-5652.


SATURDAY

Charity Ball

An enchanting night full of food, music and dancing. All proceeds benefit The American Cancer Society. Dress is black tie optional. Tickets also come with a free couple’s group lesson from Sapphire Ballroom. 7 to 11 p.m. $50. Patrick Henry Ballroom, 611 S. Jefferson St., Roanoke. 524-8514.


SATURDAY

Annual Summer Breeze Wine Festival

A special event to benefit the Augusta Regional SPCA. The animal shelter will be on hand with some of their furry friends who are in need of loving families. There’ll be live music, tastings, and festival fun at the winery. Noon to 6 p.m. $10; D’Vine Wine Club members, free (donation requested); children, free with canned pet food donations. Rockbridge Vineyard, 35 Hillview Lane, Raphine. www.rockbridgevineyard.com.


SATURDAY

Horse Hound Wine Festival

Enjoy wine from some of Virginia’s finest wineries while listening to music and visiting art, craft and food vendors. This unique wine festival has numerous events throughout the day with horses and dogs as the primary attractions, such as the Parade of Horses, a lure course and muskrat racing. 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. $20. Peaks of Otter Winery Orchards, 2122 Sheep Creek Road, Bedford. 586-3707.


SATURDAY

19th Annual New River Valley Garden Tour

This self-guided tour is held rain or shine and features seven gardens in the Blacksburg area. Local Master Gardeners will be in each garden to answer questions. Musicians from Renaissance Music Academy will be in select gardens entertaining the tourists. Proceeds benefit local library programs. 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. $12 advance, $15 door. Blacksburg Library, 200 Miller Ave., Blacksburg. 381-4846.


TUESDAY

Concert Variety Show

The Fine Arts Center for the New River Valley and the town of Pulaski are co-sponsoring a variety show featuring the Blues Brothers Tribute Artists, Josh Livingston, Jarrod Millsaps, and more. 6:30 p.m. $10 advance, $12 door, free for children 12 and younger. Calfee Park, 700 S. Washington Ave., Pulaski. 980-7363.

Recommended Reading

Jul 10, 2014
Terri Judson

Could theater venue solve Carefree’s business woes?

BY LINDA BENTLEY  |  JULY 9, 2014

Strupp said they would need to have public enthusiasm for the project and stated it ‘must appeal to heart and mind in addition to the wallet’


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CAREFREE – During the July 1 meeting, with Councilman Marty Saltzman absent, council unanimously approved the consent agenda, which included a proclamation naming the week of Sept. 22-26, 2014 as “Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve Week.”

Bill Mack, representing Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, thanked council for issuing the proclamation and commented about the difficulty returning veterans have finding employment.

Mayor David Schwan introduced Stacey Bridge-Denzak, a Cave Creek resident, as the town’s new planner who will be replacing D.J. Stapley, who has decided to return to college to attend law school.

Peter Strupp (r), president of the Desert Foothills Theater (DFT) board, a part of the Foothills Community Foundation (FCF), presented the possibility of DFT having a venue in the Carefree town center, perhaps in conjunction with the town’s expansion of the 8 Sundial building for new council chambers.

Strupp said DFT has outgrown the Fine Arts Center at Cactus Shadows High School and touted the theater as multi-generational with children as young as 4 participating.

According to Strupp, a well-run performing arts center would improve the year-round activity in the town center and enhance the quality of life in the community.

He said a 200 to 250-seat venue adjacent to town hall would not only be an ideal location for a community theater, it could provide the town with council chambers, show movies, hold film festivals and supply public social space.

Strupp said a theater would provide increased foot traffic in the town center, it is economically sustainable and it “builds on and strengthens the Carefree brand.”

He stated DFT has the ability to keep the facility booked.

While he said there are currently two successful community centers in the area, including the Holland Center on 60th Street south of Carefree Highway, where DFT and FCF are currently located, and Desert Foothills Library, Strupp said neither are pedestrian friendly locations.

He said, typically community theater is sustainable with 65 percent of its earned income from ticket sales and the balance from public support.

Strupp said they would need to have public enthusiasm for the project and stated it “must appeal to heart and mind in addition to the wallet.” 

“We are extraordinarily excited,” said Strupp, at the prospect of having a theater in the town center.

According to Schwan, after the town heard the presentation by Ed Lewis about developing his Easy Street project contingent upon the town attracting some sort of cultural arts venue as an anchor, DFT theater came to the town to make it’s pitch.

Councilman Glenn Miller asked what the next steps would be in turning the proposal into a reality.

Strupp said the next step would be continuing the conversation with the town.

Vice Mayor Les Peterson said he’s been involved in these conversations over the past 12 months with the Phoenix Art Museum, which has since declined, and ASU’s performing arts school.

However, Peterson said, “We have experience with DFT,” with its proven management and sustainability.

He said they’ve been working together on a 10-year plan.

Peterson called DFT “culturally consistent” and said he was very excited about the prospects of a theater in town, stating, “I’m very much in support of this.”

Councilman Mike Farrar said, “What a great vision” and stated it would be a great social environment.

He also asked about parking for a theater venue.

Schwan said a theater requires one parking space per every three seats and stated, “It is an intense use because everyone comes at once.”

Councilwoman Melissa Price asked about ASU doing a presentation as well.

Schwan said they asked ASU to appear but they weren’t able to attend that meeting.

Councilman John Crane asked about funding for the project.

Strupp said there would be a dedicated fundraising effort and it could take six months to a year to determine interest in the project.

Price said she would like to see ASU’s presentation at the August meeting and asked if the town saw this as something to be part of the Easy Street project.

Schwan said Lewis wants an anchor but doesn’t care where it is.

Schwan also pointed out, “ASU brings no money with them,” and said the FCF comes to them with a plan and a vision.

During public comment, Lyn Hitchon said when she and her husband lived in Philadelphia they used to attend theater in a nearby community, which she said was a boon to economic development with packed bars and restaurants.

Council unanimously approved the town’s 2012-2022 preventative road maintenance plan with an additional $75,000 for contingency.

Without taking any action, council held the first reading of an ordinance to amend the town code to allow businesses not located in Carefree but that conduct business in Carefree to obtain a Carefree business license.

According to Town Administrator Gary Neiss, when the town adopted business licenses a few years ago the ordinance passed by council required the business to be located in Carefree.

He said there are businesses located in other municipalities that wanted to obtain a Carefree business license, but were precluded from doing so under the current ordinance.

If council approves the second reading next month, Neiss said the new ordinance would go into effect 30 days from that date.

He said the $40 license fee helps fund the town’s marketing and economic development efforts.

Stapley introduced another ordinance as a housekeeping measure, stating the town’s zoning ordinance, although updated, is still referenced by the old date in its title, which he said could cause some confusion.

Stapley suggested passing the ordinance as an emergency measure so it would go into effect right away, which council did unanimously.

Council voted to go into executive session to discuss contract negotiations for judicial services for the Carefree-Cave Creek Consolidated Court and negotiations concerning development projects in the town center.

Following the executive session, council reconvened in public session where it voted unanimously to table three special event permits and road closures for the Thunderbird Art and Wine Festivals.

Recommended Reading

Jul 10, 2014
Terri Judson

Flavor! Napa Valley 2014 Tickets Now On Sale

NAPA VALLEY, Calif., July 9, 2014 /Nassau News Live/ — Tickets are now on sale for the fourth annual Flavor! Napa Valley, November 19-23, the area’s five-day celebration of food, wine and fun. Featuring legendary Napa Valley wineries, restaurants and chefs, the festival also showcases star culinary talent from across the U.S., including graduates of The Culinary Institute of America (CIA), the festival’s beneficiary. 

Festivities will include events such as celebrity chef demonstrations and intimate in-the-field workshops with purveyors as part of a series entitled Terroir to Table: Farm, Cellar, Kitchen Experience. Area vintners will host wine-paired dinners at their wineries and top winemakers will lead wine tastings at the historic CIA Greystone campus in St. Helena – events only offered in the Napa Valley, setting it apart from other food and wine festivals. The biggest party of the long weekend, The Appellation Trail, will feature nearly 25 restaurants and 100 wineries. Tickets can be purchased at flavornapavalley.com.

Renowned chefs joining the festival for the first time include Dean Fearing (CIA ’78) of Fearing’s Restaurant in Dallas, Duff Goldman (CIA ’98) of Charm City Cakes in Baltimore, Melissa Perello (CIA ’96) of Frances in San Francisco, bestselling author of The Pound A Day Diet Rocco DiSpirito (CIA ’86), Trevor Kunk (CIA ’03) of PRESS in Napa Valley, and culinary author Lee Brian Schrager (CIA ’79).

Celebrated returning chefs include Michael Chiarello (CIA ’82) of Bottega Napa Valley and Coqueta in San Francisco, Todd English (CIA ’82) of Todd English Enterprises, Larry Forgione (CIA ’74) of The CIA’s Conservatory Restaurant at Greystone, Christopher Kostow of The Restaurant at Meadowood Napa Valley, Masaharu Morimoto of Morimoto Napa, and Charlie Palmer (CIA ’79) of the eponymous restaurant group and the CIA’s Chairman of the Board.

Wine experts include Master Sommeliers Robert Bath, Tim Gaiser, Peter Granoff and Andrea Robinson, Napa Valley vintner Peter Mondavi, and winemaker Mike McGrath, among many others.

Tickets for this year’s festival range from $75 for First Taste Napa to $295 for the Welcome Dinner. To read the full release please visit: http://flavornapavalley.com/files/2014/07/Flavor_ticket_schedule_release.pdf

About Flavor! Napa Valley®
The five-day Flavor! Napa Valley® Celebration of Food, Wine Fun is an annual event featuring world-class Napa Valley wines alongside Napa Valley’s master chefs and graduates of The Culinary Institute of America. Net proceeds from the event support programs and scholarships at The Culinary Institute of America’s Greystone Campus in St. Helena. The event is hosted in partnership with Visit Napa Valley, The Culinary Institute of America at Greystone, Napa Valley Vintners, and founding sponsors Silverado Resort and Spa and Dolce Hotels and Resorts, and is produced by Karlitz Company. For more details on the festival, including where to stay, please visit flavornapavalley.com. Additionally, visit us on Facebook at facebook.com/FlavorNapaValley, and follow @FlavorNapa on Twitter.

Media Contact:
Margaux Lushing
margaux@visitnapavalley.com
707-260-0114

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