Browsing articles tagged with " wine festivals"
Jul 29, 2013
Terri Judson

S. Pellegrino and Acqua Panna sponsor Restaurant Month

S. Pellegrino and Acqua Panna celebrate our diverse
cuisine, wine and culture as sponsors of Restaurant
Month.

S. Pellegrino and Acqua Panna are proud to
partner with Auckland’s 2013 Restaurant Month, celebrating
global flavours with a local twist, old and new traditions,
unforgettable food and the finest wines, great company and
innovative events.

S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna are very
passionate about fostering and supporting the hospitality
industry around the world. They are the main sponsors of the
World’s 50 Best Restaurants and many other food wine
festivals and Young Chef programs. Endorsed by top Chefs and
Sommeliers for their unique properties and benefits, they
are also the official waters of the International Sommelier
Association.

Throughout August, Sanpellegrino will
revitalise and hydrate guests, chefs and winemakers at the
most high profile events around Auckland. These include the
Official Launch Party, the International Chef Dining Series,
the Street Eats Market and the Winter Warm Up Boutique Wine
Showcase.

Another highlight promises to be the S.
Pellegrino and Acqua Panna tribute to Italian Opera and the
legendary Luciano Pavarotti. This special collaboration is
the 3rd series of the Sanpellegrino Italian Talents project
and will be celebrated with S.Pellegrino Acqua Panna
Special Edition bottles and a special dinner at Toto hosted
by chef Sergio Maglione on Thursday August 15. The evening
will feature a special menu matched with wine and
Sanpellegrino mineral waters, and a performance by a leading
tenor. Guests will be the first to see the new S. Pellegrino
and Acqua Panna Special Edition bottles, honouring the
style, spectacle and theatre of Italian Opera.

This dinner
is open to the public, with limited seats available.
Bookings can be made by phoning Toto on (09) 302
2665.

Every occasion will highlight how S. Pellegrino
Sparkling Mineral Water and Acqua Panna Still Mineral Water
harmonise with food and wine and enhances the dining
experience. Each complements specific wine styles and
varietals, and plays a crucial role in the enjoyment and
appreciation of quality cuisine.

S.Pellegrino, Acqua
Panna and Sanpellegrino Sparkling Fruit Beverages are
international trademarks of Sanpellegrino S.p.A. which is
based in Milan, Italy. Distributed in over 120 countries
through branches and distributors in all five continents,
these products represent quality excellence by virtue of
their origins and perfectly interpret Italian style
worldwide as a synthesis of pleasure, health and well-being.
Founded in 1899, Sanpellegrino S.p.A. is the leading company
in the beverage sector in Italy with its range of mineral
waters, non-alcoholic aperitifs, drinks and iced teas. As a
major Italian producer of mineral water, it has always been
committed to enhancing this primary good for the planet and
works responsibly and passionately to ensure that this
resource has a secure
future.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

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Jul 28, 2013
Terri Judson

Tour de Beer a big hit – Las Cruces Sun

LAS CRUCES Beer has been called the new wine. The once humble brew is taking on new status and aficionados are confirming the trend at the second annual Las Cruces Tour de Beer, continuing from noon to 7 p.m. today at the Southern New Mexico Fairgrounds.

“It’s becoming a tradition for us. We used to go to wine festivals on our anniversary and now we’re doing this. We came last year and liked it, so we’re going to continue,” said Penny Laras of El Paso, celebrating her 11th anniversary with husband José at the event on Saturday.

The Tour de Beer offers opportunities for beer lovers to compare notes, sample exotic brews, stock up on their favorites and even attend beer brewing classes.

And neither rain, nor wind nor heat could daunt enthusiasts in search of beer, though overcast skies and a few sprinkles seemed to curtail early afternoon attendance, delighting early birds who’d hoped to avoid crowds at their favorite beer tents.

“We came last year and it was pretty good and they have some new venues this year. They seem to have eliminated the very long lines,” said Vince Wesley of Odessa, Tex., first in line at a sampling tent with wife Evelyn.

Monk’s Brown Ale and Idaho Springs Colorado brews got rave reviews from Matt and Dianna Gray of Las Cruces.

“We’ll be here

until it rains and maybe even after,” Matt Gray said.

Mary Carnes, of Las Cruces, would like to see the tour expand its offerings.

“It needs a little something, more activities than just commercial selling,” Carnes opined.

“It’s nice here, a nice day. I’m hoping for rain. I think it would be a little exciting,” said Philip Alvarez, of Mesilla.

“I like the German brewery samples and I like the music. I hope they play all day,” said Frank Collazo of Las Cruces, heading toward the covered music pavilion with wife Lilliam.

The tour features beers from around New Mexico, the United States and the world, along with live music, arts and crafts, food treats and some new features this year, including a brew school.

“It’s kind of like the school of wine at wine festivals,” said Dawn Starostka of Helping Hands Event Planners, festival coordinators.

Today’s classes will include “Homebrew 101,” offering guidelines for making your own beer; “Everything Goes With Beer,” a beer and food pairing talk; and a guide to beer tasting.

The Sunday entertainment roster starts with the Derrick Harris Band from noon to 3:15 p.m. and ends with EKIZ from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.

In between brews, participants can chow down on a wide variety of goodies, including bratwurst, barbecue, gorditas, burgers, smoked turkey legs, quesadillas, nachos, roasted corn, jalapeno corndogs, wood-fired pizza, mac and cheese bites, empanadas and chocolate-covered cheesecake.

Starostka said participants have a choice of more beers at this year’s event.

“We have a lot more beers. I think we had about 80 last year and this year we have over 130,” she said.

The choices have intriguing names, including Wyder’s Woodchuck Hard Cider from Canada, Liquid Ahola and Big Wave from Hawaii’s Kona Brewery and the popular local Bloody Beer.

“It’s made with Tank Premium Bloody Mary Mix and our Green Chile Lager,” explained Jim Reedy, co-owner of Mimbres Valley Brewing Company of Deming.

No pets are allowed at the event. Children will be admitted only if accompanied by their own parents or their legal guardians.

Admission is $15 at the gate. For information, call 575-522-1232 or visit online at lascrucestourdebeer.com

S. Derrickson Moore may be reached at 575-541-5450.

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Jul 28, 2013
Terri Judson

Editorial: Fair and square: So many festivals – The Bridgeton News

Gloucester County 4-H Fair, July 27, 2013A 4H Fair bake-off at the Gloucester County Fairgrounds on Saturday, July 27, 2013. (Staff Photo by Jesse Bair/ South Jersey Times)

It’s fair time! That perennial summer charmer, the Gloucester County 4-H Fair and New Jersey Peach Festival, concludes its four-day 2013 run today, but this is only the beginning of the season for South Jersey’s many annual summer fairs and harvest festivals.

If you haven’t visited this 4-H fair this year, it’s not too late. Events continue today before closing ceremonies at 5 p.m. From horse shows to the baby parade, from pony rides to games on horseback and lots of good food, there’s something for everyone at the fairgrounds off state Route 77.

The concurrent New Jersey Peach Festival celebrates the delectable summer fruit in what is still one of the top peach producing sections of the country. Catch the peach pie and cobbler contests starting at noon, then take home a basket of Jersey Fresh peaches and baked goods.

While county fairs celebrate the region’s agricultural heritage, South Jersey’s many festivals have a variety of origins, both religious and cultural. Chief among them are the harvest festivals, starting with the blueberry festivals just concluded, then the many wine festivals that celebrate the grape harvest, and ending with the big Deerfield Harvest Festival on Oct. 11, 12 and 13 this year.

The Obon Festival of Japanese Heritage in Upper Deerfield was held last weekend. Later, there will be Septemberfest (Sept. 7) in Pennsville, the Olde Greenwich (Cumberland County) Artisans Faire (Sept. 28 and 29) which dates to 1695, and the 10th Annual Italian Heritage Festival at RiverWinds in West Deptford Township on Sept. 29.

Life in South Jersey offers the opportunity to savor both the fruits of the farm and the flavors of our multicultural ancestry. Enjoy the season!

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Jul 28, 2013
Terri Judson

Editorial: Fair and square: So many festivals – The Bridgeton News

Gloucester County 4-H Fair, July 27, 2013A 4H Fair bake-off at the Gloucester County Fairgrounds on Saturday, July 27, 2013. (Staff Photo by Jesse Bair/ South Jersey Times)

It’s fair time! That perennial summer charmer, the Gloucester County 4-H Fair and New Jersey Peach Festival, concludes its four-day 2013 run today, but this is only the beginning of the season for South Jersey’s many annual summer fairs and harvest festivals.

If you haven’t visited this 4-H fair this year, it’s not too late. Events continue today before closing ceremonies at 5 p.m. From horse shows to the baby parade, from pony rides to games on horseback and lots of good food, there’s something for everyone at the fairgrounds off state Route 77.

The concurrent New Jersey Peach Festival celebrates the delectable summer fruit in what is still one of the top peach producing sections of the country. Catch the peach pie and cobbler contests starting at noon, then take home a basket of Jersey Fresh peaches and baked goods.

While county fairs celebrate the region’s agricultural heritage, South Jersey’s many festivals have a variety of origins, both religious and cultural. Chief among them are the harvest festivals, starting with the blueberry festivals just concluded, then the many wine festivals that celebrate the grape harvest, and ending with the big Deerfield Harvest Festival on Oct. 11, 12 and 13 this year.

The Obon Festival of Japanese Heritage in Upper Deerfield was held last weekend. Later, there will be Septemberfest (Sept. 7) in Pennsville, the Olde Greenwich (Cumberland County) Artisans Faire (Sept. 28 and 29) which dates to 1695, and the 10th Annual Italian Heritage Festival at RiverWinds in West Deptford Township on Sept. 29.

Life in South Jersey offers the opportunity to savor both the fruits of the farm and the flavors of our multicultural ancestry. Enjoy the season!

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Jul 27, 2013
Terri Judson

Okanagan wines highlighted on WestJet’s new Encore service this summer

Passengers flying on WestJet’s new Encore regional airline are able to sample the wines of the Okanagan Valley this summer thanks a new promotion between the company and the Okanagan Wine Festivals Society.

“As we launch WestJet Encore, we looked for a special way to promote our new destinations and routes,” Marshall Wilmot, WestJet’s vice-president of product and distribution, said in a news release. “Having worked with the wineries of British Columbia through the Okanagan Wine Festivals Society for more than 10 years, we know that the wines of British Columbia are extremely well respected and the region is recognized as one of the premium wine regions in the world. Never before on a scheduled airline in Canada have the wines of British Columbia been featured in this manner, and we are proud to do so.”

The new regional airline, which launched in June with two brand new Bombardier Q400 NextGen aircraft, is pouring only Okanagan wines on its Encore flights serving Calgary, Vancouver, Victoria, Nanaimo, B.C., Fort St. John, B.C., and Saskatoon, WestJet spokesman Robert Palmer said Monday. He said there are currently no plans to do something similar on their regular WestJet Boeing 737 flights heading to Kelowna.

Encore travellers have a choice between two Okanagan wines for purchase on each flight, one red and one white. They are the only wines available. The two-month program, which started July 1, is a great way to highlight the wines of the valley, said Summerhill Pyramid Winery winemaker Eric von Krosigk, who is also the chairman of the Okanagan Wine Festivals Society.

“This pouring allows thousands of customers to be introduced to our wines, our wine region and our Okanagan wine festivals, which draw tens of thousands of wine tourists to our region annually,” von Krosigk said in a release.

WestJet-sponsored grand tastings have been very popular events at the Okanagan wine festivals.

WestJet-sponsored grand tastings have been very popular events at the Okanagan wine festivals.

Three wine festivals are held each year — the fall festival (Oct. 4 to 14 this year) and spring celebration (May 2 to 11, 2014) feature events throughout the Okanagan Valley while the winter festival (Jan. 15 to 19, 2014) is a more intimate affair held at the Sun Peaks Resort near Kamloops, B.C.

WestJet has sponsored a grand public tasting where more than 150 wines are poured for several years.

“WestJet’s support of the festivals has helped us to expand the market to include a younger demographic,” Blair Baldwin, general manager of the festivals society, said on Monday.

“The positioning of the WestJet wine tastings as a fun and interactive experience has resulted in continuous sold-out events in both the spring and fall Okanagan Wine Festivals. In addition, last year WestJetters voted the fall wine festival the third most popular festival in Canada,” Baldwin added.

B.C. Premier Christy Clark applauded the venture.

“The Okanagan is blessed with some of the best wineries in the world. With wine tourism continuing to grow, it only makes sense for visitors to sample some of Okanagan’s finest on the way here. The pouring will be a good preview of what awaits them, and another reason to plan their next trip here,” said Clark said in a news release.

In July the participating wineries include Gray Monk Estate Winery, Lang Vineyards, Oliver Twist, Perseus Winery, Blasted Church Vineyards, SunnyBrae Vineyards, The View Winery, Therapy Vineyards, St, Hubertus Winery, and Wayne Gretzky Okanagan.

In August the highlighted wineries will include Road 13 Vineyards, the Vibrant Vine, Ganton Larsen Prospect Winery, Sumac Ridge Estate Winery, See Ya Later Ranch, Inniskillin Okanagan Estate Winery, and Jackson Triggs Okanagan Estate.

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Jul 27, 2013
Terri Judson

Oroville as center of the Okanogan

Chamber presentation focuses on tourism development

Sandy Lorentzen talks with Oroville Chamber of Commerce members at their Thursday, July 11 meeting about making Oroville a unique travel destination. Gary DeVon/staff photo

Sandy Lorentzen talks with Oroville Chamber of Commerce members at their Thursday, July 11 meeting about making Oroville a unique travel destination. Gary DeVon/staff photo

OROVILLE – Oroville as a Unique Travel Destination was the topic of conversation in a presentation by Sandy Lorentzen at the Oroville Chamber of Commerce’s Thursday, July 11 meeting.

Lorentzen lives in Seattle has been marketing the Pastime Bar Grill for her friends Vickie and Brant Henzie, but describes herself as an outsider who is a “509er at heart.” She said she has fallen in love with the Oroville area.

“To be successful we don’t need to move diners from one restaurant to another, but be a catalyst for increasing the size of the diner pool and this means drawing more people to Oroville to eat and spend.”

Lorentzen has been involved in tourism development in various capacities over the years, including helping to build international audiences for the Pacific Northwest Wagner Festival in Seattle and the Brighton Festival in England. Currently she is the website content editor for a South and Central American tour operator. She has spoken to many travel associations and written about making communities unique as travel destinations.

“I hope you will take my remarks as they are intended, to stimulate a conversation about a common vision for making tourism a greater asset to Oroville as a generator of tax revenues, employment and economic development,” she said.

She added that she wanted to start talking about the community’s assets to attract more tourists and about what makes people travel and what makes the media talk up a place.

She spoke about why people travel – the need to experience something special and how things like convention centers are not the boon that people once thought they would be.

“It’s the vacationers who spends the most because that’s all he/she has to do with time spent at the destination,” she said. “For communities that are unlikely to ever be in the game of vying for conventions, they must look to the vacationer for their tourism dollars anyway, which is what makes image so important. The great thing about image is it’s something you create.”

About events: “There are events and there are events. Events that people can see at home or that happen in a number of different places close to home will be less appealing in motivating a person to travel than a unique events,” she said. “Some of the most successful festivals attract a specialized audience. You either like chamber music or you don’t.”

The most beneficial events are ones that give visitors reasons to stop and stay, turning day trips into hotel nights, according to Lorentzen.

She gave several examples of events that started small and have grown into big events, like the Shakespeare Festival in Ashland, Ore. that started in 1935 as part of their Fourth of July celebration. Today it attracts 125,000 visitors a year, has an annual budget of $75 million and a total estimated economic impact of $168 million.

She also points to Seattle’s Wagner Festival. “You don’t have to love high German opera. You just have to love money, because not only were big spenders coming to the event, but the event was generating a lot of press,” Lorentzen said.

She says festival events that happen in the evening, or are multi-day events, are important because at least some segment of the audience doesn’t go home at night.

She said she was excited about the Tumbleweed Film Festival and thinks it has a good chance of growing into something big for Oroville and the surrounding communities. She described how the Toronto International Film Festival and the Banff Mountain Film Festival have grown into big successes.

“I would sell our Okanogan counterparts this way: Like Tumbleweed, the Napa Valley International Film Festival takes place in non-traditional venues and is intertwined with its wine and food industries,” she said. “Like Tumbleweed, it started in 2010. Its first year consisted of three evenings showing six films. Today, 125 wineries and 30 restaurants participate and over 100 films are shown in 11 venues spread among four towns. I think is potential the Canadian Okanagan travel industry will like.

“The most successful high-profile film festivals are treated like tourism assets and supported as such by their communities. Those that struggle along unaided by the beneficiary business and local economic development agencies meet a common end.”

Lorentzen said the festival’s founders have big ambitions and hope to build the event to an international stature that attracts nationwide audiences as well as establishing a filmmaking summer camp in Oroville for kids.

“How many of Oroville’s festivals hold regular events in Seattle to promote traveling to Oroville?” she asked. “Tumbleweed hosts several promotional film screenings a year in Seattle for that purpose.”

She also said going after the “foodies” can be profitable.

Food and drink events make people travel and attract a high value, low impact guest.

She describes these guests as “Affluent adults who can afford and appreciate fine wine, world-class cuisine, great natural beauty and who respect community values that have served to make the Napa Valley ‘legendary.’”

She also points to the Gilroy Garlic Festival, saying that it has grown into the “garlic capital of the world,” processing more garlic than anywhere else. However they feature only a couple types of garlic, while the Okanogan grows the most commercial varieties in the world.

“The Okanogan is the Napa Valley of garlic,” she said. “If ever there was a place that should have a huge, tourist attracting, media-generating garlic festival, it’s here. We have one in Tonasket and I applaud them for it, but its economic impact could be much, much greater.

“Maybe they would like to expand their concept geographically to include Oroville or brainstorm how to attract more tourists, but if not, there are other ways for Oroville to attract foodies,” she said.

Then there are the birders, the bicyclists, the motorcyclists and outdoor adventure enthusiasts.

“You’ve already got what they want. It’s just a matter of convincing them to come here instead of going somewhere else. For the most part, like the foodies, these people are urban too and they have discretionary income for experiences,” she said.

Lorentzen said after several months of analyzing the subject of attracting more tourists to Oroville, she has concluded Oroville is located in the wrong place – on the edge of the Cascade Loop Route but not in it, too far west and north of the Coulee Corridor and barely included in the Cascade Foothills Farmland Association’s map and cut off entirely on their website.

“Oroville needs to move to the middle,” she said, adding that Arnie Marchand had pointed out Oroville really is in the middle – between Wenatchee and the northern end of the Canadian Okanagan.

“You can get anywhere east, west, south or north in the Okanagan/Okanogan from Oroville. We know we’re in the middle, but everyone else thinks we’re on the edge. I think we can change that,” she said, diagramming an oval on a map with Oroville at its center.

She also presented a chart that showed how many more wineries, golf courses, ski areas, wine festivals restaurants, cideries and distilleries there were when Oroville is at the center. The chart showed the number of such businesses located in Oroville, often with a zero, but how they increased when you added the Canadian Okanagan and how they increased even more by adding in the American Okanogan.

A second chart showed the distances from Vancouver to Osoyoos and from Seattle to Oroville, within about 25 miles of being equidistant.

“If Vancouver is a big market for Osoyoos, Seattle should be a big market for us,” she said, suggesting the two Okanogans work together.

She points to the efforts of the Thompson Okanogan Tourism Council to develop a ten-year plan to turn the area into as big an economic generator in the shoulder and winter months as it is in the summer.

The major focus of this effort is to promote the uniqueness and build the reputation of its natural attractions and events. One example is they plan to inventory and promote the regions agricultural products that fit into the slow food movement. All the sub-units of the Thompson Okanogan region are working at this same goal, according to Lorentzen.

“We want Canadians. Thompson Okanogan wants Americans. Unlike some communities, we also want Americans to travel to Canada if they have to pass through Oroville to get there. The Okanogan/Okanagan is a win win,” she said.

When she began her hour-long talk, Lorentzen said she wanted to head up the chamber’s “Wacky Ideas Committee.”

“That’s where I’d like to serve because daydreaming is a good thing in tourism development,” she said. “Dreams put people in motion and most ideas, until proven, seem farfetched – like landing a man on the moon.”

She concluded by saying tourism development is not rocket science and that unique events and attractions make people travel…commonplace attractions and events don’t.

“It always takes time and small successes building on one another to get a community to embrace common vision for tourism development. I think we can do it.”

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Jul 26, 2013
Terri Judson

DJ CHEF To Compete on Food Network’s New Show Cutthroat Kitchen

(LONG ISLAND, NY) Long Island’s own DJ CHEF will compete on Food Network’s new competition show Cutthroat Kitchen hosted by Alton Brown on Sunday 8/18 at 10pm. Cooking skills aren’t enough to win in Food Network’s Cutthroat Kitchen – in this new competition series, chefs must also be crafty, clever and willing to sabotage their opponents.

This game features a briefcase filled with $100,000 in cash, four competitors, three rounds of cooking and auctions where chefs bid on items to help themselves or hinder their opponents. The thirteen-episode series premieres on Sunday, August 11th at 10pm ET/PT, immediately following the Food Network Star finale, which airs at 9pm ET/PT.

DJCHEF

“Cutthroat Kitchen is a cooking competition like viewers have never seen before – culinary skills can get chefs into the kitchen, but they will have to play a game of wits to stay there,” said Bob Tuschman, General Manager and Senior Vice President, Food Network. “Alton is the perfect ring leader to the mayhem – his expertise and devilishly delightful sense of humor set just the right tone for this unique new series.”

Marc Weiss known globally as DJ CHEF “The Chef That Rocks!” is only culinary entertainer who simultaneously cooks DJ’s for special events wide.

Marc started out as DJ prep cook in Long Beach, NY went on to graduate from the New York Restaurant School in Manhattan. As a chef he trained under star chefs Bobby Flay, Matthew Kenney John Tesar. He worked local at George Martin, Tuscany, Coyote Grill JEM/Morell Caterers.

Marc went on to caterer his own dinner parties, which transfer in cooking parties and today DJ CHEF parties.

$25,000 to spend wisely over the course of the game on auction items to help themselves or sabotage their competitors. After each cooking challenge is given, chefs have sixty seconds to gather ingredients in the pantry and then regroup for an auction to bid on culinary curveballs such as the exclusive use of salt or not allowing their opponents to taste their dishes. A chef will be eliminated after each of the three rounds, and the last competitor to survive wins the money they have left in their bank.

After the show, viewers can visit FoodNetwork.com/CK to watch Alton and each episode’s judge revisit the chefs’ biggest missteps and most surprising triumphs.

More info about DJ CHEF can be found at http://www.djchef.com/

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Jul 26, 2013
Terri Judson

Pulse Cover: Tour de Beer – Las Cruces Sun

Click photo to enlarge

Get ready to belly up and hoist a frosty brew at the second annual Las Cruces Tour de Beer.

Beers from around New Mexico, across the nation and throughout the world are set to be featured. In addition to tasty brews, there will be live music, arts and crafts and food to mark the occasion. Tour de Beer is from noon to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday, at the Southern New Mexico State Fairgrounds.

The 2013 Tour de Beer will offer some new features and a big increase in the number of beers offered.

“We have more breweries and a lot more beers this year,” said Dawn Starostka of Helping Hands Event Planning, which is coordinating the event. “I think we had about 80 last year and this year we have over 130. We’re also adding a brew school, which will be kind of like the school of wine at wine festivals.”

Each day of the festival, the new Brew School, will present “I Know How to Drink Beer … But How Do I Taste It?” a guide to beer tasting, at 2 p.m.; “Homebrew 101,” with guidelines for making your own beer at 3 p.m.; and “Everything Goes With Beer,” a food and beer pairing talk, at 4 p.m.

Shade tents and misters will offer a respite from the heat.

Saturday’s entertainment roster will feature Phat Soul from noon to 3:15 p.m. and The Liars from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. Sunday’s line up starts

with the Derrick Harris Band from noon to 3:15 p.m. and closes with EKIZ from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.

No pets are allowed at the fairgrounds. Children will be admitted only if accompanied by their own parents or their legal guardians.

Admission is $15 at the gate or $12 in advance, and includes a souvenir glass, a ticket book for tastings,

For information, call 575-522-1232 or visit lascrucestourdebeer.com.

The 2013 list of featured brews, includes:

•Angry Orchard

•Batch 19

• Becks

• Big Sky Brewing

• Blue Moon

•Brecken Ridge

• Bridgeport

• Crispin Brown

• Deschutes

• Fox Barrel

• Franziskaner

• Goose Island

• Guinness

• Heineken

• Henry Weinhard’s

• High Desert Brewing

• Hoegaarden

• Isotopes

• Imports

• Killian’s

• Kona Brewing

• Lagunitas

• Leffe

• Left Hand

• Left Hand Brewing

• Leinenkugel

• Magic Hat

• Marble

• Mike’s

• Mimbres Valley Brewing

• Monk’s Ale

• New Belgium

• New Castle

• Odell Brewing

• Oskar Blues

• Peroni

• Pyramid

• Red Strip

• Redds

• Redhook

• Sam Adams

• Santa Fe Brewing

• Shiner

• Shock Top

• Sierra Nevada Brewing

• SKA

• Smithwick’s

• Spaten

• Stella Artois

• Strongbow

• Third Shift

• Tommy Knocker

• Widner Brothers

• Woodchuck

S. Derrickson Moore may be reached at 575-541-5450

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Jul 26, 2013
Terri Judson

Tour de Beer welcomes brew fans – Las Cruces Sun

LAS CRUCES Get ready to belly up and hoist a frosty brew at the second annual Las Cruces Tour de Beer.

Beers from around New Mexico, the United States and the world, plus live music, arts and crafts and food treats will be among attractions at the fiesta from noon to 7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday at the Southern New Mexico Fairgrounds.

The 2013 Tour de Beer will offer some new features and a big increase in the number of beers offered.

“We have more breweries and a lot more beers this year. I think we had about 80 last year and this year we have over 130. We’re also adding a brew school, which will be kind of like the school

of wine at wine festivals,” said Dawn Starostka of Helping Hands Event Planning, which is coordinating the event.

Each day of the festival, the school will present “I Know How to Drink Beer … But How Do I Taste It?” a guide to beer tasting, at 2 p.m.; “Homebrew 101,” with guidelines for making your own beer at 3 p.m.; and “Everything Goes With Beer,’ a food and beer pairing talk, at 3 p.m.

Shade tents and misters will offer a respite from the heat.

Saturday’s entertainment roster will feature Phat Soul from noon to 3:15 p.m. and The Liars from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m. Sunday’s line up starts with the Derrick Harris Band from noon to 3:15 p.m. and closes

with EKIZ from 3:30 to 6:30 p.m.

The 2013 list of brews includes Mimbres Valley Brewing, High Desert Brewing, Shock Top, Kona Brewing, Redhook, Isotopes, Odell Brewing, Beck’s, Stella Artois, Big Sky Brewing, Left Hand Brewing, Leffe, Hoegaarden, Spaten, Franziskaner, Goose Island, Widner Brothers, Woodchuck, Sam Adams, Breckenridge, New Castle, Peroni, Red Stripe, Heineken, Killians, Marble, Left Hand, Tommy Knocker, Sierra Nevada Brewing, Shiner, Bridgeport, Santa

Fe Brewing, Crispin Brown, Blue Moon, Leinenkugel, Pyramid, Redds. Batch 19. Third Shift, Fox Barrel, Monk’s Ale, Mike’s, Strongbow, Angry Orchard, Henry Weinhard’s, Magic Hat, SKA, Smithwick’s, Guinness, Lagunitas, New Belgium, Deschutes and Oskar Blues Brewery.

No pets are allowed at the fairgrounds. Children will be admitted only if accompanied by their own parents or their legal guardians.

Admission is $15 at the gate or $12 in advance. For information, call 575-522-1232 or visit online at lascrucestourdebeer.com.

S. Derrickson Moore may be reached at 575-541-5450.

Recommended Reading

Jul 25, 2013
Terri Judson

Vancouver International Wine Festival a big success

The very first “Bard on The Beach” Vancouver International Wine Festival was the same kind of roaring success as its previous incarnation as the Vancouver Playhouse Wine Festival.

From Feb. 23 through March 3, there were a multitude of wine minglers, seminars, lunches, brunches and amazing wine dinners, numerous associated tasting events and of course the Bacchanalia Gala Dinner and Auction.

The Regional Theme for 2013 featured the wines of California. “In an increasingly competitive global marketplace, with growing consumer environmental awareness, California vintners are committed to farming responsibly and utilizing the best science available.”

Monterey County based Hahn Family Wines uses organic approved and reduced-risk synthetic pesticides like Stylet oil in their vineyards instead of sulphur, when possible, which controls mildew and suppresses mites.

Hahn Pinot Noir (831099) $21.99 is soft at first sip, almost sweet, with some earthy beet and subtle herbal hints hovering around a sturdy core of ripe strawberry and black cherry fruit flavours and aromas.

The Global Theme for this year’s Festival was Chardonnay – from around the world. And with 63 participating California wineries attending there were some serious everyday values as well as stunningly deluxe Chardonnays.

Mid-range for this specialist in luxury wines Paul Hobbs Russian River Ranches Chardonnay (745620) $56.99 was a full throttle treat over which numerous wine lovers lingered, poured by the knowledgeable and legendary local wine agent Richard Carras – awarded last year’s “Spirited Industry Professional.”

Wine Festival Executive Director Harry Hertscheg was thrilled by the Festival’s transition from Playhouse to Bard on The Beach, “I’m excited that the Wine Festival will continue to thrive through a vibrant new partnership with Bard on the Beach and our long-time industry partners, particularly the BCLDB, foreign consulates and wine agent community.”

Despite the global focus on Chardonnay and the regional focus on California, there was an enormous variety of wines and styles from other countries. And some of these were also white, without being Chardonnays.

Some of the most interesting wines at Wine Festivals are also (…and always) Speculative Listings. While these wines are unavailable by the bottle, in most BC Liquor Stores they can be ordered by the case. Savvy private wine store operators will seek these intriguing speculative wines out and offer them to their customers by the bottle.

An amazingly richly fruited white from Spain’s Rueda, Aviva Viño Naia Verdejo (83485) $21.99 was a stand-out! With the “racy,” “bright,” acidity and kiwi fruit of an exceptional New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc, this lightly golden mouth-filling white overflows with oodles of tangerine, passion fruit and mango. Depending on the availability of savvy private wine store operators in your area, you may have to get a few friends together and order a case from a BC Liquor Store and split it with a friend or two.

In a room full of fabulous wines from California: Cabernets Sauvignon, Syrah, Pinot Noir, Zinfandel and Chardonnay – not to mention the wonderful blends – despite the unarguable quality of so many of them, our fickle taste buds cry out for novelty, for something more, for something different.

Spain and Portugal both continue to offer unique and intensely interesting wines – both white and red. Often the QPR – quality to price ratio – of these Iberian wines continues to be amazing!

Jose de Maria Fonseca Perequita Superiore (155390) $15.99 is a mix of native Touriga Nacional with more international Syrah. Smooth and rich, this dusky red hovers around the blackcurrant, blackberry and black cherry fruit zone, framed by wisps of earthy liquor ice and fresh ground dark coffee beans.

Ripe blue-black damson plum and prunes flavours mingle with dark, spicy cherries in Ramos Pinto “Duas Quintas” (428649) $17.99. It is a blend of Tinta Roriz, Touriga Franca and Touriga Nacional with a splash of Tinta Cao from two vineyard sites in the Douro Valley – Quinta de Ervamoira and Quinta dos Bons Ares.

It was such a treat to have the wine world come to our doorstep! Next year’s Vancouver International Wine Festival themes and dates have already been announced. Theme Region for 2014 will be France. Global focus is on sparkling wine. Keep Feb. 24 – March 2 of next year clear on your calendar and make plans to attend this wine extravaganza. See you there!

Doug Sloan is a Campbell River wine enthusiast. Reach WineWise by emailing douglas_sloan@yahoo.com.

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