Browsing articles tagged with " wine festivals"
Aug 23, 2013
Terri Judson

Atlassian adds Enrique Salem, Jay Parikh to board

Atlassian co-founders Mike Cannon-Brookes and Scott Farquhar. Photo: Nic Walker

Australian start-up success story Atlassian has taken another step towards the giant tech company stakes by making two key appointments to its board and rekindling rumours of a Nasdaq listing.

The software company nabbed former Symantec chief executive Enrique Salem and Jay Parikh, an Atlassian client whose day job as vice-president of infrastructure engineering is to keep Facebook running. The appointments will lend the company big-time expertise and kudos in the US market.

“We are thrilled that Jay and Enrique are joining our board,” said Scott Farquhar, the Australian co-founder of Atlassian.

Facebook vice president of infrastructure engineering Jay Parikh. Photo: Facebook

Salem is on US President Barack Obama’s management advisory board and other technology boards.

Atlassian chairman Doug Burgum is a former Microsoft and SuccessFactors heavyweight, director Murray Demo was chief financial officer of Adobe, while the two remaining board members are venture capitalists.

The new appointments will add further fuel to expectations the company will complete an initial public offering (IPO) on the Nasdaq stock exchange later this year.

Enrique Salem, ex-CEO of Symantec.

Mr Farquhar and co-founder Mike Cannon-Brookes, who made the 2013 BRW Rich 200 list this year valued at $250 million each, have remained silent on an IPO but have pledged not to list in Australia.

‘‘Any future listing, if it were on the cards, would not be on the ASX,’’ Mr Farquhar told BRW in June.

‘‘We’d be almost the only software company [on the ASX] … you wouldn’t get the valuation, they wouldn’t understand our story the way the US would.’’

Alan Noble, engineering director at Google Australia and startupAUS board member. Photo: Quentin Jones

Started in a Sydney garage on a $10,000 credit card debt, Atlassian was founded in 2002 when the pair were both 22, after meeting at the University of NSW while studying science and technology degrees.

Atlassian is one of many Australian start-ups going for gold in the US.

This week Perth company Moko revealed it would reach 5 million American college students with its bespoke mobile advertising-driven social network. It hopes to list on Nasdaq in the near future.

Australian start-up festival announced

Atlassian’s move came as StartupAUS, the non-profit group formed to foster technology entrepreneurship in Australia, announced Australia’s first start-up festival.

Starting September 18, Startup Spring is a three-week, Australia-wide festival of more than 50 events and activities that aims to ‘‘celebrate and promote’’ the tech start-up community.

It will encompass gatherings in NSW, Queensland, South Australia, Victoria, Western Australia and the Australian Capital Territory. In Sydney alone there will be a pub meeting for start-ups to talk to each other face-to-face, a barbecue, an entrepreneurs day at Google’s office, a ‘‘walkabout’’ day during which start-ups will open their doors to visitors, and even a day for people to learn how to pitch ideas.

“Australia has film festivals, music festivals and wine festivals which are a tremendous celebration of our culture,’’ said Alan Noble, founding board member of StartupAUS and engineering director at Google Australia. ‘‘Now it’s time for the country’s first start-up festival.’’ 

Mr Noble said the festival would help Australian start-ups take centre stage.

‘‘We want to see Australian kids growing up not just aspiring to be lawyers, doctors, or bankers, but also to see entrepreneurship as a valid and rewarding path,’’ he said.

twitter This reporter is on Facebook: /bengrubb

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Aug 23, 2013
Terri Judson

Google startup group announces Australian festival

Google’s StartupAUS group has announced Startup Spring, a three-week festival to promote entrepreneurship in Australia.

Startup Spring will run from 18 September to 9 October in cities across Australia, including Perth, Sydney, Melbourne, Brisbane and Adelaide. Events announced so far include OzAPP, Google for Entrepreneurs Day, Startup Walkabout and Startup Weekend.

“With over 50 events Australia wide Startup Spring aims to showcase the existing startup community, build interest about the sector in the wider community, and encourage entrepreneurialism to Australians,” said Peter Bradd, StartupAUS board member and director of the Fishburners co-working space in Sydney.

StartupAUS hopes the event will increase the prominence of Australia’s startups, Bradd told Techworld Australia.

“Building awareness is a main theme underpinning growth of the ecosystem and changes in funding and regulation. Startup Spring amplifies what’s already happening and boosts awareness to the Australian public.”

StartupAUS also hopes to encourage would-be startups across Australia to turn their ideas into reality, Bradd said.

“No one should be struggling alone at home and no one should be in a job they don’t like instead of creating a solution to a problem they’re passionate about,” he said. “This festival will help entrepreneurs find out about the incredible support that is available, and that they can tap into.

“An entrepreneurs journey should not be a lone one, support systems are key and we want to create more relationships and networks to help.”

Google engineering director and StartupAUS founding board member, Alan Noble, said in a statement that the event is important for promoting startups.

“Australia has film festivals, music festivals and wine festivals which are a tremendous celebration of our culture. Now, it’s time for the country’s first startup festival,” he said.

“With today’s focus on how Australia can maintain its wealth beyond the resource sector, there’s never been a better time for Australia to become the creators, rather than just the consumers, of technology.

“We want to see Australian kids growing up not just aspiring to be lawyers, doctors, or bankers, but also to see entrepreneurship as a valid and rewarding path.”

A report earlier this year by Google and PricewaterhouseCoopers found that Australia’s startup scene could add $109 billion to the economy and 540,000 jobs over the next 20 years, if fostered properly.

Google developed StartupAUS with the goal of raising the voice of Australian startups, Noble told Techworld Australia in April.

“The startup community hasn’t been well represented and hasn’t had the strong advocacy that it needs,” he said.

The StartupAUS board is currently composed of Bradd, Noble, Bill Bartee of Southern Cross Ventures and Stephen Baxter of River City Labs.

Follow Adam Bender on Twitter: @WatchAdam

Follow Techworld Australia on Twitter: @Techworld_AU

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Aug 23, 2013
Terri Judson

Taxes not an issue with FloydFest ticket sales

The Virginia Department of Taxation says sales tax is not charged on tickets for entertainment events like FloydFest, negating a concern about potential lost revenue expressed last week at a meeting of Floyd County Board of Supervisors.


A spokesman for the state agency referred a Floyd Press reporter to a department ruling in 2008, which said:

“The tax does not apply to sales of tickets, fees, charges, or voluntary contributions for admissions to places of amusement, entertainment, exhibition, display, or athletic contests, nor to charges made for participation in games or amusement activities.”

In last week’s meeting, Supervisor Chairman Case Clinger of Courthouse District asked if the county was losing potential sales tax rebates because Across the Way Productions, Inc. – the partnership of FloydFest founders Kris Hodges and Erika Johnson that operates the event and various public wine festivals – is registered as a Montgomery County company.

Floyd Mayor Will Griffin – a Certified Public Accountant – told The Floyd Press Friday that sales tax is not an issue because the state exempts entertainment tickets. Research into laws in other places found that such taxes are charged in 31 states – including nearby West Virginia – but not Virginia.

Clinger also suggested the county consider charging FloydFest $15.00 for each car parked in Floyd County when the festival had to close the offsite lots near the festival site in Patrick County because of heavy rains and mud and the school system provided transportation from parking lots at Floyd County High School, Floyd Elementary School and the County Commerce Center on Christiansburg Pike.

Clinger Tuesday said he feels the county has such authority through Virginia law, which states: “Any locality may provide off-street automobile parking facilities and open them to the public, with or without charge, and when any locality constructs or has constructed any such facility, it may lease space therein for private commercial purposes which are necessary for sound fiscal management of the parking facility or which space is not suitable for parking.”

But the Virginia Attorney General’s office, when contacted by The Floyd Press and asked if the law applied to the county, declined public comment, saying only that the law would need to be “investigated” to see if a specific Floyd County ordinance is required to implement the state regulation and to see if the county currently operates any county facilities that charges for parking.

Virginia also has rules against “ex post facto” implementation of laws, fines and other charges after the fact.

School buildings and public lots are used for non-school events, including business-related functions like the annual Citizens Telephone meeting, but parking is not charged for such activities. The county does not currently operate any fee-based parking facilities.

Floyd County’s school system did charge FloydFest $50.00 an hour for use of the school buses and the operators paid just over $17,000. School superintendent Dr. Kevin Harris said the school system cleared about $9,000 after paying drivers and cleaning the buses.

Clinger and county administrator Dan Campbell said FloydFest officials have been invited to the supervisors’ meeting on Tuesday night, August 27, starting at 7 p.m. in the county administration building on Oxford Street in Floyd.

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Aug 22, 2013
Terri Judson

Eight things to do in the DC area on the weekend of Aug. 23-25



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The weekend’s best in nightlife, music and art. For even more, check out Nightlife Agenda.

Saturday-Sunday: Hear ye, hear ye. It’s time to don your stockings and ready your Prius steed. The Maryland Renaissance Festival returns for the season this weekend in Crownsville, just outside Annapolis. On Saturday and Sunday, admission for kids 11 and younger is free; the festival continues through late October.

CROWNSVILLE, MD - SEPTEMBER 02:  during the annual Maryland Renaissance Festival on Sunday September 02, 2012 in Crownsville, MD.  The festival is open on Labor Day and then Saturdays and Sundays from 10 a.m.-7 p.m.  It runs through October 21st.  (Photo by Matt McClain for The Washington Post)

(Photo by Matt McClain for The Washington Post)

Saturday: Aug. 28 is the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington, and activities centered around the milestone will kick off this weekend and run through next week. Saturday, beginning at 8 a.m. at the Lincoln Memorial, thousands are planning to retrace the 1963 march’s route through the city; there are also exhibits, bike tours and more all linked to the milestone event. Read more about the anniversary and what it will mean this weekend here.

Saturday:  The Dragon Boat Regatta is a summer tradition in the D.C. area, as teams from throughout the East Coast come to paddle the Potomac in 20-person boats spurred on by the cadence of a pace-setting drummer. When gliding down the river in synchronicity, it’s a sight to behold. Races begin at 8:30 a.m. and continue until 4 p.m. at National Harbor,

Saturday: History buffs will could lose themselves in Decatur House’s War of 1812 Open House, which features chances to roam the nearly 200-year-old home, listen to musicians performing songs of the early 19th century, learn War of 1812 trivia and see fashions of the day. The free event, which kicks off at 10 a.m., also offers kids activities, including lessons in making spyglass.

Saturday: Time was, an ice cream sandwich was just an ice cream sandwich. But the days of vanilla ice cream between two sticky chocolate pads are long over. The golden age of the ice cream sandwich is upon us, and Brightest Young Things celebrates with the Cookies Cream Ice Cream Social, an all-you-can-eat cookie-thon with offerings from more than two dozen local sweet-makers,  including Ripple, Captain Cookie, Uncle Chip’s and Shake Shack, all  from noon to 4 p.m. at Penn Social.

Saturday: Where many wine festivals put sips first and sounds second, the inaugural New Vintage Jazz and Wine festival at the Fairgrounds leads with its killer musical lineup. Curated by the jazz lovers at Capital Bop and the Petworth Jazz Project, the festival brings together New York guitar virtuoso Rafiq Bhatia, excellent local Afrobeat band Funk Ark and D.C. ensemble Kris Funn Corner Store, plus painting performances from Art Whino’s stable of artists. The wine? In this case, it’s merely a bonus.

Saturday: The spare sound and conscious rhymes of Goodie Mob helped define Southern hip-hop in the 1990s; the Atlanta group is responsible for coining the term “Dirty South” on the single of the same name. Cee Lo Green is back in the fold after more than
a decade, having found success with Gnarls Barkley (“Crazy”) and solo (“Forget You). Goodie Mob kicks off a national tour at the 9:30 club Saturday, just before the release of their first album in nearly 15 years.

Sunday: It has been a slow couple of weeks for concerts, but the Black Cat has been filling its stage with some interesting offerings this month from comedy to a summertime version of its holiday staple, Rock N Shop. Sunday brings “Throwing Shade,” a live version of the women-friendly, gay-friendly comedy podcast from television writers Erin Gibson and Bryan Safi (who has written for the likes of “The Ellen DeGeneres Show”).

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Aug 22, 2013
Terri Judson

Wine Talk: Wine buying guide

Buying wine should be fun, but for most people it is a great ordeal. A buyer approaching the dairy shelves knows exactly which yogurt or cottage cheese to buy. The choice is made without hesitation.

There are not so many brands, and the one they are loyal to will immediately be visible.

However, the prospective wine buyer is faced with a wall of wine, usually with unfamiliar labels, and there is the added pressure of having to buy the right one. We always fear that our partner or guest knows far more about wine than we do. Not easy.

The first obstacle is to decide the best place to buy. It will likely be your regular local supermarket, but even then you want to be sure the shelves are well managed and the wines well kept.

The best supermarkets will have the shelves filled up tidily. There should be a good range from a number of different wineries, with different wine styles and at a variety of price points. The better red wines, where sales will be lower and prices higher, should be lying horizontally to preserve quality. A good guide as to whether the supermarket manages its wine department well is the state of the white wines. If there are too many white wines of older vintages, turning yellow in color, it is a sign that throughputs are low or that stock control is poor. Likewise, if the better red wine bottles are dusty, it also may not be a good sign.

Two tips to make your visit to the supermarket easier: Firstly, I recommend you go with an idea of what you want in advance.

It may be a wine that costs less than NIS 40, a Merlot or simply a white wine to go with fish. This gives a focus of what to look for.

Secondly, when you get to the wine shelves, it is important to take a few seconds to understand how the wines are laid out. They may be set out by winery, brand, region, color, grape variety or wine style. Once you have figured that out, it will be easier to find whatever you are looking for.

Usually, the bottom shelf is reserved for grape juice, Kiddush wine and the very cheapest wines. The middle shelves are for the big sellers, and the top shelf is for the sparkling wines and better wines. Either look for a price you are prepared to pay, a brand (label or winery) that you are familiar with or a particular grape variety you like.

If you buy the wine with the prettiest label, that is also okay. You are not alone! The best promotions are normally in the wine displays that are set apart from the wine section. There is always a wide choice of offers, particularly before the holidays.

Remember that the cheapest wine is never the best offer. The cost of the capsule, label and bottle are similar, so the difference between a bottle of NIS 25 and NIS 50 is… the wine! A word of warning: A fantastic promotion on a wine you have never heard of should set alarm bells ringing. It is always wise to choose something you know with the discounted prices. You don’t want to buy a dead-dog wine just because it’s inexpensive.

There are generally two approaches. Most people buy what they know and like. There is nothing wrong with that. If that is your way, buy the bottle you want at the price you can afford. Certainly never be pressured into paying more than your budget or buying something supposedly better to please someone else’s taste.

The alternative is to always challenge yourself by purposefully choosing something new. Try a new variety, a different style or wine from another winery. It is by experimenting that we broaden our horizons and learn more. If you usually like Sauvignon Blanc and it is described on the back label as a crisp aromatic dry white, you can look at the back labels of other whites to find something else with a similar description.

Don’t forget that some supermarkets offer online purchases, which saves carrying those heavy glass bottles home. It is great idea if you know what you want in advance.

Unfortunately, you will be unlikely to find someone who can help you in a supermarket.

If you want a more considered choice, with expert advice, then your best bet is to make the extra effort to go to a specialist wine store. Such stores offer good prices and a wider range of non-kosher imports.

(Most supermarkets will sell kosher wines only.) Wine shops will often provide tastings of their wines, allowing you to sample and buy the wines on offer, often at a discounted price.

The most fun place to buy wine is at the winery itself. There are hundreds of wineries covering the Land of Israel from top to bottom. So there is no lack of wineries to choose from. The larger wineries may have proper wine shops and visitors’ centers.

Most of these will be kosher and not open on Shabbat, festivals and memorial days.

Of the smaller wineries, some will not be kosher and therefore will be open on Shabbat.

All will be happy to give a taste of wine to encourage a purchase. However, to avoid disappointment, it is always wise to book a visit in advance.

At a winery, you can be sure the wines are at their best because they have not traveled.

There is nothing better than drinking the wine of the particular winery you have visited. It gives an extra insight and feeling of understanding. It is rather like seeing the kitchen and meeting the chef of the restaurant where you are going to eat.

The eager wine student will read the wine reviews in the national press, looking for the best buy and recommendations. There are also regular wine festivals in different locations or Friday morning tastings in wine shops. In short, there is plenty of opportunity to taste and experiment to find your favorites.

Or you may remember a wine you enjoyed the last time you ate out. The restaurant arena is a good place to try something new, especially when the person ordering doesn’t know your preference. Trying to find a particular wine is an instance where you might benefit from asking at your local wine shop. They may know the actual wine.

Or if not, they will be able to recommend something similar.

If you are buying for a dinner party, I strongly advise you not to worry too much about matching the wine to the food. We say today, “Match the wine to mood, not to food.” In other words, buy what you feel is the right choice for the occasion. Good wine and good food go together.

Most hosts will decide on the food first, and then will think of the wine. Matching may not be necessary, but that does not mean it isn’t fun to do so! Just remember there is no perfect match, so there is no pressure because taste is not absolute.

Whatever size your dinner party is, you will only have to buy one or two wines.

One stop at the supermarket. That is all. It will be more complicated and take far more time to buy all the ingredients for each dish you are preparing. So keep the wine aspect in perspective. Making that wine purchase need not be as daunting a prospect as you might fear.

Summer of Riesling

There’s nothing like a chilled glass of this wonderful wine, made from the noblest of grapes, on a warm evening or at the holiday table.

Don’t be surprised to come across signs in Tel Aviv this month that read “I Love Riesling.” It is part of a campaign that started in New York to promote the virtues of one of the world’s most noble grape varieties.

Riesling – and I am referring to the German variety, not to Emerald, Laski, Welsch or any other imposter – is astonishingly underrated and undervalued by many of the world’s wine drinkers.

Yet to the serious wine drinker and confirmed Riesling fan, this grape variety produces some of the greatest of all white wines.

Riesling is very versatile. It produces wine that covers the full spectrum from bone dry white wines with great acidity to delicately balanced semidry wines, as well as frothy sparkling wines to luscious dessert wines. The Riesling aroma will always be delicate and not blowsy, reminiscent of wild flowers and honeysuckle.

The wines will show a refreshing minerality and reflect a sense of place. They will not be oaky or high alcohol. In fact, they are ideal wines for both our climate and cuisine.

The person who has led the Riesling campaign in Israel is the charismatic, talented Aviram Katz. He is the sommelier of Toto Restaurant, arguably the leading wine restaurant in the country.

By his example and through his dynamic lead, Tel Aviv will be giving this focus to Riesling. I recommend you make the most of it.

The king of Riesling is, of course, Germany. But Alsace, Austria and New Zealand also make superb Rieslings.

Then there is also Australia. For those who drink blue and white, there are even some Israeli Rieslings, such as the Carmel Single Vineyard Riesling, Gamla Riesling, Vitkin Riesling (NK) and the Teperberg Silver Riesling Late Harvest.

Anything called Riesling, White Riesling, Johannisberg Riesling or Rhine Riesling is the real thing.

Seek it out and join in the fun.

You might also end up saying, “I love Riesling.”

Adam Montefiore works for Carmel Winery and regularly writes about wine for Israeli and international publications. adam@ carmelwines.co.il

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Aug 22, 2013
Terri Judson

6th Annual Vermont Life Wine and Harvest Festival opens Sept. 20

Thursday August 22, 2013

WILMINGTON/ WEST DOVER — The 2013 Vermont Life Wine and Harvest Festival has become one of the Mount Snow Valley’s most popular and entertaining gatherings.

This year’s celebration of Vermont producers is projected to draw some 2,500 visitors to Wilmington and Dover for a long weekend of tastings, dinners, culinary demonstrations, shopping, and entertainment.

The festival begins on Friday, Sept. 20, with a welcome evening event in the village of Wilmington. This opening event features wine and cheese tastings, the great Vermont Soup Contest showcasing soups from area restaurants and live entertainment throughout shops in the downtown. On Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 21 and 22, festival events shift to nearby West Dover, where a huge tented area is located next to the landmark clock-tower building at Mount Snow. In addition to wine and spirits samplings, attendees will be delighted to discover Vermont specialty foods and crafts.

Lunch is available from Vermont restaurants. Children’s activities provided. At night, wine dinners take place in area restaurants.

“Attendees have the pleasure of being able to go from tasting excellent local wines and regional cuisines to enjoying the Vermont fall foliage all in one locale,” said Cheryl LaFlamme, one of the event coordinators and president of the Mount Snow Valley Chamber of Commerce.

Now in its sixth year The Vermont Life Wine and Harvest Festival has earned a coveted designation as one of the Vermont Chamber of Commerce’s Top Ten Fall Events and is listed as a U. S. Top 100 Event by the American Bus Association.

Event organizer and Mount Snow Valley Chamber of Commerce Executive Director Adam Grinold said, “The recognition and accolades that the Vermont Life Wine and Harvest Festival has already received is exciting.

Steve Cook, deputy commissioner of Vermont Department of Tourism and Marketing, said, “I’ve been to many wine festivals throughout New England and the northeast region, and I can tell you that the setting at Mount Snow is unlike any others I’ve seen. Wine tasting events are usually held in beautiful locations, but at Mount Snow, there’s not only the festival, but easy access to outdoor recreation, historic sites, the arts, and beautiful Vermont villages right in the same place. Festival attendees will find ample free parking directly at the Festival sites.

There will be chairlift rides to view the foliage and easy access to hiking trails, fishing and kayaking sites. Pre-ski season lodging rates and packages are being widely promoted at many accommodations within walking distance of festival events. A great bonus to festival attendees, the events are served by the Mount Snow Valley’s free shuttle bus service called “the MOOver.”

A reminder: everyone needs to bring identification: the legal drinking age in Vermont is 21. In addition to wine tastings, sample and purchase Vermont artisanal foods and products including cheese, chocolate, crafts and more.

On Friday evening, Sept. 20, in Wilmington village, the Wine and Harvest welcome event is free including the mouth-watering Vermont Soup Contest.

The wine tasting portion of the night, including a wine glass, is $8 per person. On Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 21 and 22, at Mount Snow resort in West Dover, admission is $15 per person, or $26 for a two-day pass. The tickets include the official Festival wine glass and a specified number of tastings. Most of festival events require no advance purchase of tickets or reservations; however, reservations are recommended for the Wine Pairings Dinners. For full festival details, call 802-464-8092; email info@VisitVermont.com, or visit www.TheVermontFestival.com. The Vermont Life Wine Harvest Festival is owned and managed by the Mount Snow Valley Chamber of Commerce.

Participating Vermont Wineries, Distillers and Brewers Boyden Valley Winery, Cambridge Caledonia Spirits and Winery, Hardwick Champlain Orchards, Shoreham East Shore Vineyard, Grand Isle Grand View Winery, East Calais Honora Winery and Vineyard, Jacksonville Lincoln Peak Vineyard and Winery, New Haven Neshobe River Winery, Brandon North Branch Vineyards, Montpelier Putney Mountain Winery, Putney Shelburne Vineyard, Shelburne Snow Farm Vineyard, South Hero And – Dunc’s Mill Distillers, Hardwick Eden Ice Cider Company, West Charleston Saxton’s River Distillery, Saxton’s River Vermont Spirits Distilling Company, Hartford and Long Trail Brewing Company, Bridgewater Corners.

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Aug 21, 2013
Terri Judson

Following Record-breaking Justin Boots Deployment, Conductiv Lauches POS …

Posted Date: 8/20/2013

Mobile commerce software provider Conductiv launched its Interact Mobile POS Solution, customized for retail pop-up stores.

“Our Pop-Up POS solution is designed specifically for retailers looking to extend their reach,” says Jeff Saunders, Conductiv’s COO. “Speed, simplicity and security are at the core of our Mobile Pop-Up POS.”

“Now that WiFi and cell service are virtually everywhere, retailers can be more creative with how and where to sell their brands—in front of the store, at an outdoor fair, even in the middle of Rockefeller Plaza,” says Bob Daughton, executive vice-chairman of Conductiv. “In addition, retailers are finding that our Pop-Up solution is a great ‘line-buster’ to handle peak traffic periods and critical sales peaks in their traditional brick-and-mortar locations.”

Two recent success stories of businesses selling smarter and better with Conductiv’s Mobile Pop-Up POS are Justin Boots, a Berkshire Hathaway company, and Bellview Winery, recently voted New Jersey’s top winery.

Justin Boots: new sales record at Berkshire Hathaway event
At the 2013 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholders Meeting, Justin Boots set up a pop-up store using Conductiv’s Mobile Pop-Up system, and sold over 1,000 pairs of boots in 10 hours. That’s an average of one and a half pairs per minute, handily breaking their previous sales record. “This exceeded even our most optimistic projections,” said Chuck Schmalbach, Justin Boots VP of Sales and Administration. “There is simply no way we could have sold anywhere near this amount in such a limited retail space without Conductiv. It was an amazingly easy system to use, and the Conductiv approach was cheap and easy to deploy. And it was fast.”

Bellview Winery: increased sales from a small footprint
New Jersey’s Bellview Winery extended the reach of its tasting room into wine festivals this summer with Conductiv’s Mobile Pop-Up system. On average, they are selling over 600 bottles of wine every 8 hours, or one and a quarter bottles per minute, while increasing their wine club membership and brand recognition. Using Conductiv at the winery while hosting special events like the 2013 Seafood Wine Festival, Bellview sold over 1,700 bottles, or more than three and a half bottles per minute for 8 straight hours.

Jim Quarella, Owner of Bellview Winery, was very pleased with the system’s performance and said: “Conductiv allowed us to track and manage all of our sales in each of our distinct sales locations in one system. We had a very large sales volume over the weekend, and with Conductiv we were able to easily keep our lines short even with overwhelming crowds. It was also extremely easy to train new employees who have never used the system in a matter of minutes.”

“Retailers really appreciate that Conductiv is a nondisruptive system. It works as a full-featured standalone POS, or it works as a mobile extension of existing systems like Retail Pro or Microsoft’s RMS,” says Rob O’Farrell, Conductiv’s CTO. “And we cover all of the operational needs for a pop-up: secure payments, cash handling, CRM, sales/inventory reporting and other KPIs. Plus, it sets up in minutes. It really is a ‘works-right-out-of-the-box’ solution.”

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Aug 20, 2013
Terri Judson

Mobile Commerce Leader Conductiv Software Announces Customized Mobile …

Two recent success stories of businesses selling smarter and better with Conductiv’s Mobile Pop-Up POS are Justin Boots, a Berkshire Hathaway company, and Bellview Winery, recently voted New Jersey’s top winery.

Justin Boots: New Sales Record at Berkshire Hathaway Event

At the 2013 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholders Meeting, Justin Boots set up a pop-up store using Conductiv’s Mobile Pop-Up system, and sold over 1,000 pairs of boots in 10 hours. That’s an average of one and a half pairs per minute, handily breaking their previous sales record. “This exceeded even our most optimistic projections,” said Chuck Schmalbach, Justin Boots VP of Sales and Administration. “There is simply no way we could have sold anywhere near this amount in such a limited retail space without Conductiv. It was an amazingly easy system to use, and the Conductiv approach was cheap and easy to deploy. And it was fast.”

Bellview Winery: Increased Sales from a Small Footprint

New Jersey’s Bellview Winery extended the reach of its tasting room into wine festivals this summer with Conductiv’s Mobile Pop-Up system. On average, they are selling over 600 bottles of wine every 8 hours, or one and a quarter bottles per minute, while increasing their wine club membership and brand recognition. Using Conductiv at the winery while hosting special events like the 2013 Seafood Wine Festival, Bellview sold over 1,700 bottles, or more than three and a half bottles per minute for 8 straight hours. Jim Quarella, Owner of Bellview Winery, was very pleased with the system’s performance and said: “Conductiv allowed us to track and manage all of our sales in each of our distinct sales locations in one system. We had a very large sales volume over the weekend, and with Conductiv we were able to easily keep our lines short even with overwhelming crowds. It was also extremely easy to train new employees who have never used the system in a matter of minutes.”

“Retailers really appreciate that Conductiv is a nondisruptive system. It works as a full-featured standalone POS, or it works as a mobile extension of existing systems like Retail Pro or Microsoft’s RMS,” says Rob O’Farrell, Conductiv’s Chief Technology Officer. “And we cover all of the operational needs for a pop-up: secure payments, cash handling, CRM, sales/inventory reporting and other KPIs. Plus, it sets up in minutes. It really is a ‘works-right-out-of-the-box’ solution.”

About Conductiv Software Inc.:

Founded in 2011, Conductiv is a software company that produces Collaborative Mobile Commerce applications and services for the retail industry. The company has offices in New York, Seattle and Los Angeles. Conductiv provides its full suite of software-as-a-service solutions primarily to clients within the apparel, action sports, fashion, electronics and beverage industries. For more information about Conductiv and its innovative retail applications, please visit www.conductiv.com.

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Aug 19, 2013
Terri Judson

Mobile Commerce Leader Conductiv Software Announces Customized Mobile …


NEW YORK, Aug 19, 2013 (BUSINESS WIRE) –
Conductiv, the mobile software commerce company specializing in
innovative handheld sales apps for the retail industry, announced today
the availability of its Interact Mobile POS Solution, customized for
retail pop-up stores.

“Our Pop-Up POS solution is designed specifically for retailers looking
to extend their reach,” says Jeff Saunders, Conductiv’s Chief Operating
Officer. “Speed, simplicity and security are at the core of our Mobile
Pop-Up POS.”

“Now that WiFi and cell service are virtually everywhere, retailers can
be more creative with how and where to sell their brands–in front of the
store, at an outdoor fair, even in the middle of Rockefeller Plaza,”
says Bob Daughton, Executive Vice-Chairman of Conductiv. “In addition,
retailers are finding that our Pop-Up solution is a great ‘line-buster’
to handle peak traffic periods and critical sales peaks in their
traditional brick-and-mortar locations.”

Two recent success stories of businesses selling smarter and better with
Conductiv’s Mobile Pop-Up POS are Justin Boots, a Berkshire Hathaway
company, and Bellview Winery, recently voted New Jersey’s top winery.

Justin Boots: New Sales Record at Berkshire Hathaway Event

At the 2013 Berkshire Hathaway Annual Shareholders Meeting, Justin Boots
set up a pop-up store using Conductiv’s Mobile Pop-Up system, and sold
over 1,000 pairs of boots in 10 hours. That’s an average of one and a
half pairs per minute, handily breaking their previous sales record.
“This exceeded even our most optimistic projections,” said Chuck
Schmalbach, Justin Boots VP of Sales and Administration. “There is
simply no way we could have sold anywhere near this amount in such a
limited retail space without Conductiv. It was an amazingly easy system
to use, and the Conductiv approach was cheap and easy to deploy. And it
was fast.”

Bellview Winery: Increased Sales from a Small Footprint

New Jersey’s Bellview Winery extended the reach of its tasting room into
wine festivals this summer with Conductiv’s Mobile Pop-Up system. On
average, they are selling over 600 bottles of wine every 8 hours, or one
and a quarter bottles per minute, while increasing their wine club
membership and brand recognition. Using Conductiv at the winery while
hosting special events like the 2013 Seafood Wine Festival, Bellview
sold over 1,700 bottles, or more than three and a half bottles per
minute for 8 straight hours. Jim Quarella, Owner of Bellview Winery, was
very pleased with the system’s performance and said: “Conductiv allowed
us to track and manage all of our sales in each of our distinct sales
locations in one system. We had a very large sales volume over the
weekend, and with Conductiv we were able to easily keep our lines short
even with overwhelming crowds. It was also extremely easy to train new
employees who have never used the system in a matter of minutes.”

“Retailers really appreciate that Conductiv is a nondisruptive system.
It works as a full-featured standalone POS, or it works as a mobile
extension of existing systems like Retail Pro or Microsoft’s RMS,” says
Rob O’Farrell, Conductiv’s Chief Technology Officer. “And we cover all
of the operational needs for a pop-up: secure payments, cash handling,
CRM, sales/inventory reporting and other KPIs. Plus, it sets up in
minutes. It really is a ‘works-right-out-of-the-box’ solution.”

About Conductiv Software Inc.:

Founded in 2011, Conductiv is a software company that produces
Collaborative Mobile Commerce applications and services for the retail
industry. The company has offices in New York, Seattle and Los Angeles.
Conductiv provides its full suite of software-as-a-service solutions
primarily to clients within the apparel, action sports, fashion,
electronics and beverage industries. For more information about
Conductiv and its innovative retail applications, please visit www.conductiv.com.

SOURCE: Conductiv Software Inc.

        Conductiv Software Inc.
        David Matt, 917-576-9660
        davidmatt@conductiv.com

Copyright Business Wire 2013

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Aug 18, 2013
Terri Judson

Okanagan Pride Festival organizers ‘overwhelmed’ by number of participants


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Countless rainbow flags were held proudly Saturday as hundreds marched from Stuart Park to City Park to celebrate the final day of the Okanagan Pride Festival in Kelowna.

Wilbur Turner, president of Okanagan Pride Society and co-chair of the Pride Festival said he was “overwhelmed” by this year’s numbers.

“This is totally amazing; I would say it’s probably four to five times larger than last year,” said Turner.

“We had a lot of media coverage and a lot of promotion. The calibre of entertainment that we’re bringing in has attracted people as well. We’ve also been advertising across Canada—so I think it’s paying off.”

Saturday’s Pride March and Festival in the Park concluded a week of festivities, which included Soul Food Sunday, the second annual Drag Competition and Show, and Viva Las Pride, a brand new event that saw Okanagan Pride team up with Okanagan Wine Festivals for a night of wine tasting and casino entertainment.

Approximately 70 volunteers offered their services throughout the week to help ensure the events ran smoothly.

On Saturday, Turner told the crowd at City Park the Pride community is like one large family.

“We’re a family because we’re connected by a struggle that has gone on for years, for equality.

“We just want to be treated like everybody else—equally.”

He added the Canadian lesbian-gay-bisexual-transgender community has many privileges many others internationally do not.

“We need to remember those people and stand in solidarity and love.”

Calling Pride Week “a celebration of diversity,” Kelowna Mayor Walter Gray read the 2013 Pride Week proclamation and told those in attendance: “There’s support at City Hall for what you’re doing.”

wpaterson@kelownacapnews.com

Twitter: @PatersonWade

 

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